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Preview of Next Month's Ubuntu and This Week's GNOME Release

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GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Preview Part 5: New System Settings!

    Now, Ubuntu Artful gets a new System Settings with a fully-new interface from GNOME 3.25. It's officially renamed to Settings and it got big changes. It's very amusing to read Georges Staracas' article (the developer of Settings) especially the fact that more than 30.000 lines of code changed since v3.20 by 15 contributors! This means when finally released, Ubuntu 17.10 will include Settings by default. Now let us see the quick look at Artful here. Enjoy!

  • Ubuntu’s Suru Icon Theme Is Being Revived

    If you loved the look of the Unity 8 desktop as used in Canonical’s shelved Ubuntu phone and tablet project, I can guarantee you’re going to love the following icon set.

    Why? Because it is the Ubuntu phone and tablet icon set!

    Yup, even though Ubuntu Touch died and Canonical (painfully) let the majority of its design team go, the story isn’t yet done for the Suru icon theme.

  • See What’s New in GNOME 3.26

    Today sees the release of GNOME 3.26 — and you’re probably wondering what new features are going to be on offer.

    [...]

    The GNOME desktop is made up of multiple parts. This includes the main user interface (called ‘GNOME Shell’) as well as core apps (like the file manager Nautilus), and ‘invisible’ background libraries and services that help glue everything together.

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: AMD, Mesa, VESA and More

  • AMD Moving Forward In Their RadeonSI Support For ARB_gl_spirv
    AMD open-source developer Nicolai Hähnle has spent the past few months working on the ARB_gl_spirv extension as mandated by OpenGL 4.6. Some of the prep work for supporting that extension has landed in Mesa 17.4-dev Git. ARB_gl_spirv is about bringing SPIR-V support to OpenGL drivers, the IR shared by Vulkan and OpenCL 2.1+. ARB_gl_spirv allows for loading SPIR-V modules into OpenGL programs and allows for GLSL to be a source language in creating SPIR-V modules. This is basically for creating better interoperability between OpenGL and Vulkan/SPIR-V.
  • Mesa Glthread Gets Adds Another Game, AMDGPU Winsys Gets Performance Workaround
    This week has started off to being another busy time in Mesa Git just ahead of the holidays. First up, Mount & Blade: Warband is the latest game to be white-listed by the Mesa glthread functionality for enabling OpenGL threading on this Steam Linux game. Mount & Blade: Warband was actually whitelisted back in July but then disabled a few days later as it turned out not to be working.
  • VESA Rolls Out DisplayHDR As Its Latest Standard
    VESA has rolled out DisplayHDR 1.0 as its newest standard. As implied by the name, the standard is in regards to specifying HDR (High Dynamic Range) quality for displays.
  • VC5 OpenGL & Vulkan Driver Advancing
    Broadcom developer Eric Anholt has offered an update on the state of the VC5 Gallium3D driver for OpenGL support as well as the work being done on the "BCMV" Vulkan driver. Additionally, the VC4 Gallium3D driver for existing Raspberry Pi devices continues to get better.
  • Initial Tessellation Shader Support For RadeonSI NIR
    The RadeonSI Gallium3D driver's NIR back-end is moving one step closer to feature parity with the existing OpenGL capabilities of this AMD GCN graphics driver. Timothy Arceri working for Valve has been focusing on the NIR back-end recently for RadeonSI. This NIR intermediate representation handling is being driven in order to add SPIR-V ingestion support to RadeonSI with code sharing for RADV's existing NIR-based infrastructure.

Games: Rocket League, Ultimate Trivia Challenge, Grass Cutter, Hyper Knights: Battles, Opus Magnum

If You're Ready for Arch, ArchMerge Eases the Way

Newcomer ArchMerge Linux offers a big change for the better to those switching from the Debian Linux lineage to the Arch Linux infrastructure. ArchMerge Linux is a recent spinoff of ArchLabs Linux. I recently reviewed Archlabs and found it to be a step up from most Arch Linux offerings in terms of installation and usability. Arch Linux distros, in general, are notorious for their challenging installation and software management processes. ArchMerge Linux brings a few extra ingredients that make trying it well worth your while if you want to consider migrating to the Arch Linux platform. Still, no Arch Linux distro is a suitable starting point for Linux newcomers. That reality does not change with ArchMerge, although it helps ease the process considerably for those who are ready for it. Read more

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