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Preview of Next Month's Ubuntu and This Week's GNOME Release

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GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Preview Part 5: New System Settings!

    Now, Ubuntu Artful gets a new System Settings with a fully-new interface from GNOME 3.25. It's officially renamed to Settings and it got big changes. It's very amusing to read Georges Staracas' article (the developer of Settings) especially the fact that more than 30.000 lines of code changed since v3.20 by 15 contributors! This means when finally released, Ubuntu 17.10 will include Settings by default. Now let us see the quick look at Artful here. Enjoy!

  • Ubuntu’s Suru Icon Theme Is Being Revived

    If you loved the look of the Unity 8 desktop as used in Canonical’s shelved Ubuntu phone and tablet project, I can guarantee you’re going to love the following icon set.

    Why? Because it is the Ubuntu phone and tablet icon set!

    Yup, even though Ubuntu Touch died and Canonical (painfully) let the majority of its design team go, the story isn’t yet done for the Suru icon theme.

  • See What’s New in GNOME 3.26

    Today sees the release of GNOME 3.26 — and you’re probably wondering what new features are going to be on offer.

    [...]

    The GNOME desktop is made up of multiple parts. This includes the main user interface (called ‘GNOME Shell’) as well as core apps (like the file manager Nautilus), and ‘invisible’ background libraries and services that help glue everything together.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: WebAssembly, Mozilla Test Pilot, VR and Bootstrap

  • Testing GNU FreeDink in your browser
    This is a first version that can be polished further but it works quite well. This is the original C/C++/SDL2 code with a few tweaks, cross-compiled to WebAssembly (and an alternate version in asm.js) with emscripten. Nothing brand new I know, but things are getting smoother, and WebAssembly is definitely a performance boost. I like distributed and autonomous tools, so I'm generally not inclined to web-based solutions. In this case however, this is a local version of the game. There's no server side. Savegames are in your browser local storage. Even importing D-Mods (game add-ons) is performed purely locally in the in-memory virtual FS with a custom .tar.bz2 extractor cross-compiled to WebAssembly.
  • Welcome Punam to the Test pilot team!
    A couple months ago Punam transferred from another team at Mozilla to join the Test Pilot team. Below she answers some questions about her experience and what she’s looking forward to. Welcome, Punam! [...] Before Mozilla I have worked with SonicWall, eBay and Symantec doing web development.
  • This week in Mixed Reality: Issue 7
    Missed us last week? Our team met in Chicago for a work week. If you had the chance to come and meet us at the CHIVR / AR Chicago meetup, thanks for swinging by. We strategized our short and long term plans and we're really excited to share what we're unfolding in the coming weeks.
  • Why bootstrap?
    Over the next few quarters, I'm going to focus my attention on Mozilla's experimentation platform. One of the first questions we need to answer is how we're going to calculate and report the necessary measures of variance. Any experimentation platform needs to be able to compare metrics between two groups. For example, say we're looking at retention for a control and experiment group. Control shows a retention of 88.45% and experiment shows a retention of 90.11%. Did the experimental treatment cause a real increase in retention or did the experiment branch just get lucky when we assigned users? We need to calculate some measure of variance to be able to decide. The two most common methods to do this calculation are the frequentist's two-sample t-test or some form of the bootstrap. In ye olden days, we'd be forced to use the two-sample t-test. The bootstrap requires a lot of compute power that just wasn't available until recently. As you can imagine, the bootstrap is all the rage in the Data Science world. Of course it is. We get to replace statistics with raw compute power! That's the dream!

FreeBSD 11.2 Beta 3 Brings LLVM Updates, Various Fixes

For those of you with some extra time over this US holiday weekend due to Memorial Day, FreeBSD 11.2 Beta 3 is now available for testing. This third weekly beta release of FreeBSD 11.2 comes with various updates to the LLVM compiler stack, support for setting service types for outgoing RDMA connections via the KRPING utility, fixing a SPARC64 boot issue, and a variety of other bug fixes. Read more Direct: FreeBSD 11.2-BETA3 Now Available

Cumulus Networks Continues to Build on Linux to Enable Next Generation Networking

Now in 2018, Cumulus' model of enabling white box networking with a Linux based distribution has increasingly become the norm and along with that shift, Cumulus has become increasingly successful. Cumulus has raised a total of $129 million in funding, including a $43 million Series D round that was announced on Jan. 23. In a video interview with EnterpriseNetworkingPlanet at the 2018 OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, Rivers outlines how the company has evolved in recent years and where it is going next. "We have help to change the world around with the concept of buying switching hardware and software separately," Rivers said. Read more Also: Open source networking startup Lumina Networks raises $10 million Series A round from Verizon Ventures

Devices: QNAP, Seeed, New SOM

  • QNAP Launches 16-Bay AMD Ryzen-Based TS-1677X NAS with 10 GbE
    QNAP will offer four models of the TS-1677X NAS with various CPUs and different amount of memory. The manufacturer did not disclose prices, but since we are talking about enterprise-grade NAS, they are not going to be low.
  • Latest ReSpeaker mic array offers improved barge-in and full duplex operation
    Seeed has launched an upgraded, $69 “ReSpeaker Mic Array v2.0” for far-field voice control that works with any Linux, Mac, or Windows computer. It enables simultaneous playback and recording and offers improved barge-in voice recognition. [...] Seeed launched the ReSpeaker microphone array on Kickstarter in 2016, and followed up a year later with the $25 ReSpeaker 4-Mic Array for Raspberry Pi add-on board. Seeed’s new v.2.0 is an upgrade to the original ReSpeaker, but like the Raspberry Pi version, it’s not an SBC boardset, but is instead controlled via a separate attached computer.
  • Microchip – New SOM simplifies industrial-grade Linux designs (SAMA5D27)
    The Microchip SAMA5D27 SOM removes the complexity of managing signal integrity, EMI and ESD for high-speed interfaces and power management in MPU-based industrial Linux designs.