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OSS: Sharing, Hadoop, AI, Symphony Software Foundation and Shakthi Kannan

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OSS
  • Need for speed unites open source and corporations for new serverless tech

    The open-source community used to thrive on rebellion against profitable proprietary corporations like Microsoft Corp. and others. All have since reconciled, and are now joining forces to fight common enemies holding back agile development.

    “Open source doesn’t have that enemy anymore. It’s the standard,” said John Furrier (@furrier) (pictured, right), co-host of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s mobile livestreaming studio. “So the questions is what is going to motivate the organizations?”

  • Evolving Government: Why government needs open-source deep learning

    Deep learning is cutting edge artificial intelligence. It’s what Google used to build AlphaGo, which beat the world champion of board game Go earlier this year in China. It’s what powers a lot of self-driving cars, by giving their machine vision human-level accuracy. And it’s being used by many of the world’s top tech companies as the basis for recommender systems, fraud detection and cybersecurity.

    [...]

    Open-source software is the bedrock of enterprise and government applications, from Linux through to Hadoop. The next layer to go open-source is AI, and that’s great news for government agencies. But open-source alone is insufficient: those agencies should make sure their tools till play well with others in the stack, so that they can march their AI solutions to the finish line. During our time in the government-focused startup accelerator, DCode42, the Skymind team learned firsthand the kind of partner and collaboration that agencies and departments require to adopt and implement new technology.

  • Open Source Artificial Intelligence: 50 Top Projects

    For this list, we selected 50 of the most well-known of these open source artificial intelligence projects. They are organized into categories and then alphabetized within those categories. The lines between some of the categories can be fuzzy, so we used the project owners' descriptions of their applications to determine where to place the various tools.

  • Symphony Software Foundation Launches Open Source Strategy Forum

    - Symphony Software Foundation (the Foundation), the nonprofit organization fostering innovation in financial services through open source software, will be hosting its inaugural Open Source Strategy Forum at the BNY Mellon Conference Center in New York on November 8, 2017. Registration is open today.

  • Shakthi Kannan – the Free and Open Source Software ‘Shakthimaan’

        

    Our Techie Tuesdays of the week, Shakthi Kannan dons the hats of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) advocate, documentation expert, and DevOps engineer with ease. 

    Impeccably attired, Shakthi Kannan was half an hour early for our meeting, which, in essence, describes the man – meticulous and a perfectionist.

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Cumulus Networks Continues to Build on Linux to Enable Next Generation Networking

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Devices: QNAP, Seeed, New SOM

  • QNAP Launches 16-Bay AMD Ryzen-Based TS-1677X NAS with 10 GbE
    QNAP will offer four models of the TS-1677X NAS with various CPUs and different amount of memory. The manufacturer did not disclose prices, but since we are talking about enterprise-grade NAS, they are not going to be low.
  • Latest ReSpeaker mic array offers improved barge-in and full duplex operation
    Seeed has launched an upgraded, $69 “ReSpeaker Mic Array v2.0” for far-field voice control that works with any Linux, Mac, or Windows computer. It enables simultaneous playback and recording and offers improved barge-in voice recognition. [...] Seeed launched the ReSpeaker microphone array on Kickstarter in 2016, and followed up a year later with the $25 ReSpeaker 4-Mic Array for Raspberry Pi add-on board. Seeed’s new v.2.0 is an upgrade to the original ReSpeaker, but like the Raspberry Pi version, it’s not an SBC boardset, but is instead controlled via a separate attached computer.
  • Microchip – New SOM simplifies industrial-grade Linux designs (SAMA5D27)
    The Microchip SAMA5D27 SOM removes the complexity of managing signal integrity, EMI and ESD for high-speed interfaces and power management in MPU-based industrial Linux designs.

There's real reasons for Linux to replace ifconfig, netstat, et al

One of the ongoing system administration controversies in Linux is that there is an ongoing effort to obsolete the old, cross-Unix standard network administration and diagnosis commands of ifconfig, netstat and the like and replace them with fresh new Linux specific things like ss and the ip suite. Old sysadmins are generally grumpy about this; they consider it yet another sign of Linux's 'not invented here' attitude that sees Linux breaking from well-established Unix norms to go its own way. Although I'm an old sysadmin myself, I don't have this reaction. Instead, I think that it might be both sensible and honest for Linux to go off in this direction. There are two reasons for this, one ostensible and one subtle. The ostensible surface issue is that the current code for netstat, ifconfig, and so on operates in an inefficient way. Per various people, netstat et al operate by reading various files in /proc, and doing this is not the most efficient thing in the world (either on the kernel side or on netstat's side). You won't notice this on a small system, but apparently there are real impacts on large ones. Modern commands like ss and ip use Linux's netlink sockets, which are much more efficient. In theory netstat, ifconfig, and company could be rewritten to use netlink too; in practice this doesn't seem to have happened and there may be political issues involving different groups of developers with different opinions on which way to go. Read more