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Laptops/Desktops With GNU/Linux Preinstalled: Talos II, Chromebooks

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GNU
Linux
  • Support the Talos II, a candidate for Respects Your Freedom certification, by pre-ordering by September 15

    We've previously supported the work of the folks at Raptor Engineering. This time, rather than a crowdfunding effort, we are asking you to support their work by pre-ordering the Talos II. The system comes in a variety of forms to meet your needs, from a workstation to rack-mounted to the board by itself. Raptor Engineering has put in a great deal of effort researching and prototyping this system, and now it is ready for prime time. The Talos II is great for any hacker who needs a powerful machine, perfect for developing even more free software.

  • FSF To Look At RYF Certification For The POWER9 Talos II

    Last month Raptor Engineering announced the Talos II POWER9-powered workstation that is cheaper than the original Talos Workstation while still aiming to be very free software friendly. The Free Software Foundation will be exploring the possibility of "Respect Your Freedom" certification on this hardware when it's ready to ship.

  • Chrome OS Will Soon Allow All Chromebook Owners to Rename USB Flash Drives

    Google's Chromium evangelist François Beaufort is back with more goodies for Chromebook owners, recently revealing the fact that future versions of Chrome OS will allow users to rename attached USB flash drives.

    A new "Rename" option has been added to the right-click context menu of the Files app on Chrome OS, which allows you to rename an attached USB flash storage devices, be it either a USB stick or an external drive. The renaming feature, which is currently available on the Chrome Canary experimental channel, can also be enabled using the CTRL+Enter keyboard shortcut on your Chromebook.

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