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KDE and GNOME: Developing KDE PIM with Docker, GObject Introspection, GNOME 3.26 Days Away

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GNOME
  • Developing KDE PIM with Docker

    Getting started with contributing to KDE PIM can be hard – we have nearly 60 repositories with complicated dependencies – just getting that right can discourage many people from even trying. And then there’s, of course, the risk factor of running development build alongside your production Kontact, endangering your precious emails.

    To address all these issues I have created a Docker image. It’s based on the KDE Neon Developer edition and it has all the dependencies pre-installed and pre-configured and comes with a set of handy shell scripts to make your life easier. It also has the environment set up properly so that you can run the development build of Kontact inside of the container – completely isolated from your production installation.

    Interested now? Follow the instructions how to build the Docker image and how to run the container on our KDE PIM Docker wiki page.

  • The Magic of GObject Introspection

    When we started GNOME in 1997, we didn't want to write all of it in C. We had some inspiration from elsewhere.

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  • Approaching 3.26

    So, we're on final stretch towards the GNOME 3.26 release next week, just released the last beta of Maps (3.25.92) earlier in the week. This cycle hasn't seen that any real ground-breaking user-visible changes. But various smaller bugfixes. Nevertheless there's been a few nice improvements on the surface (as seen in earlier blogposts).

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