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Software: PulseAudio, PiCluster, Wikit, massif-visualizer, Kdenlive, OpenShot, Elisa, and GNOME

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Software
  • News: New release of PulseAudio.
  • PiCluster – A Simple, Web-based Docker Management Application

    PiCluster is a simple, open source, web-based docker management application used to manage Docker containers across multiple hosts. Unlike Docker Swarm or Kubernetes, PiCluster is easy to setup and use. The latest PiCluster version has brought new features. It makes the process of creating containers much easier than ever. Say for example, the users can now upload a zip of their Dockerfile’s to the PiCluster web console and the files will be copied to every node and extracted in the Docker directory specified in PiCluster config file. Also, when a container is added, the image will be automatically built and run in a single step. In previous releases, users would have to manually create the container. It will work on both 32-bit and 64-bit platforms.

  • Wikit – Get Wikipedia Summaries From Commandline In Linux

    Wikipedia has several millions of articles and the number of articles are steadily increasing every single day. It is the first place that comes to my mind when I’m looking for knowledge. Today, I have stumbled upon a simple, yet useful command-line utility called “Wikit”. It displays the summary of any Wikipedia article in Terminal. As we all know already, the Wikipedia has the largest and most comprehensive articles. If you don’t want to waste time to read a comprehensive Wikipedia article, you can then use Wikit to get Wikipedia summaries from commandline. To be precise, Wikit will display the first few paragraphs (the summary, of course) before the table of contents of a Wikipedia article.

  • massif-visualizer 0.7.0 released

    Massif Visualizer is a visualiser for output generated by Valgrind’s massif tool. It shows you graphs which measure how much heap memory your program uses.

  • Kdenlive 17.08.1 released

    Although the team is at full throttle getting ready for the 17.12 big refactoring release, we make available the first point release of the 17.08 series bringing various bugfixes and usability improvements. Stay tuned for testing the refactoring branch packages to be announced soon.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Released, Focuses on Stability

    A new version of OpenShot, the crash-happy open-source non-linear video editor, is available to download. While the previous couple of releases were big on features the latest release is a “stability-focused release”, says project lead Jonathan Thomas.

  • OpenShot 2.4.0 Released | Improved Stability & More!

    The latest and greatest version of OpenShot Video Editor (version 2.4.0) has been officially released, and I'm proud to bring you all the details! This is a stability-focused release, and much of the effort was "behind-the-scenes" type work.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Brings Better Stability To This Open-Source Video Editor

    Jon Thomas has announced the release of the OpenShot Video Editor 2.4 released. Among the features of OpenShot 2.4 are "vastly improved stability" for this non-linear, cross-platform video editor.

  • Essential Tools for Producing High Quality Podcasts on Linux

    Podcasts are a booming business, and many audio pros are seeing more and more work dedicated to this platform. Mac and Windows users have plenty of options for professionally recording and mastering audio, but Linux users aren’t quite as lucky. Yet if you really love the penguin, there are still awesome podcast tools for producing high-quality podcasts on Linux.

  • Twitter Finally Rolls Out Night Mode Feature to Linux, Windows and Mac Users

    The long-anticipated Night Mode feature is ready to conquer your desktop, help stop eye strain, and help you fall asleep after a long night of twittering. The feature is currently rolling out to the desktop version of twitter.com and should be supported on all modern web browsers, including Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, and Opera.

  • Elisa, Accessibility and other News

    I should be communicating more often about development related to the Elisa music player. Recently Safa Alfulaij added support for right-to-left interface. This is a very good excuse to talk about what happened since my previous post.

  • GNOME 3.26rc2 (2.25.92) RELEASED
  • GNOME 3.26 RC2 Released: The Final Step For This Big GNOME Update

    GNOME 3.25.92 is available today, marking the last development release before the official GNOME 3.26 debut.

  • EA's Frostbite Engine Has Been Internally Up And Running On Linux

    While not for public consumption at least for now, the Electronic Arts' Frostbite game engine has seen internal Linux testing/development.

    EA developer Johan Andersson was comparing the size of the Linux kernel source tree to that of their Frostbite game engine: there are more files, lines, comments, and code in Frostbite than in the Linux kernel. Johan has been a technical fellow and director at EA since 2000.

  • Shuffle the Decks with These Ace Open Source Card Games

    A card game is a game that uses playing cards as the main way the game is played. The cards can be a standard deck of 52 French playing cards with 4 suits of Spades, Hearts, Diamonds, and Clubs. Or the cards can be game-specific. There is a plethora of card games available, with families of related games.

    Card games offer many positive attributes. They can improve mental skills, memory and logic. They can test your patience, help you focus, and are popular for all ages. Having a good memory is essential to a person’s overall well-being. A good way to improve memory is playing fun games. Whether it’s a board game or a deck of cards, putting your brain to work definitely has its advantages. The earlier a person who has a poor working memory can begin to strengthen it, the more successful they’ll be in life.

More in Tux Machines

Games Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Julita Inca Chiroque: Parallel Computing Talk
  • Open Source Monitoring Conference: Speakers, Agendas, and Other Details
    One of today’s leading tech conferences, the Open Source Monitoring Conference (OSMC), is back to bring together some of the brightest monitoring experts from different parts of the world. The four-day event will be held at Holiday Inn Nuremberg City Conference in Germany starting today, November 21st, until November 24th.
  • Why a Dallas-area tech startup opened a KC office
  • Open education: How students save money by creating open textbooks
    Most people consider a college education the key to future success, but for many students, the cost is insurmountable. The growing open educational resource (OER) movement is attempting to address this problem by providing a high-quality, low-cost alternative to traditional textbooks, while at the same time empowering students and educators in innovative ways. One of the leaders in this movement is Robin DeRosa, a professor at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. I have been enthusiastically following her posts on Twitter and invited her to share her passion for open education with our readers. I am delighted to share our discussion with you.

Android Leftovers

Linux 4.10 To Linux 4.15 Kernel Benchmarks

The ThinkPad X1 Carbon has been enjoying its time on Linux 4.15. In addition to the recent boot time tests and kernel power comparison, here are some raw performance benchmarks looking at the speed from Linux 4.10 through Linux 4.15 Git. With this Broadwell-era Core i7 5600U laptop with 8GB RAM, HD Graphics, and 128GB SATA 3.0 SSD with Ubuntu 17.10 x86_64, the Linux 4.10 through 4.15 Git mainline kernels were benchmarked. Each one was tested "out of the box" and the kernel builds were obtained from the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel archive. Read more