Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNOME and KDE: System Settings Progress, Akademy Results, and More

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • System Settings Progress

    I would like to provide some information on working with System Settings. This is a big endeavor and not an easy one. System Settings is a good expression of the power of KDE and also the many influences that have shaped it over the years.

    Trying to untangle the work that has gone into System Settings requires time and patience. I have always been interested in working in revamping this UI. We worked with the team in the VDG on this some time ago, and altough there were many great and interesting changes, the scope of the work was too great. Therefore, we decided only to move forward with those things that were achievable at the time.

  • Akademy Results

    At the beginning of the summer I went to Akademy in Almeria. So what did it bring, in terms of development? I can point to the FreeBSD-on-KDE-Slimbook posts as one technical result of Akademy, although I suppose I could have just had the machine shipped to me, too. (There need to be more posts about the laptop, as FreeBSD support for it improves; I must admit I’ve been a little lax in hacking on that).

  • Move status icons to your GNOME top bar

    However, there are also free and open source apps with the same issues. These apps haven’t been updated to use newer features when installed in a GNOME environment like Fedora Workstation.

  • GTK, Python, WebKit and Latex Workshops on Fedora 26

    This afternoon, we did two workshops at PUCP, one to present and code in GTK and the other to work with Latex, each one lasted an hour. Thanks to the organizers of INFOSOFT 2017 for the opportunity to share free Software tools to people. This event was free to everyone and we did a volunteer job as a group to promote Fedora and the GNOMe project in our local community.

  • Paying for FOSS apps

    There’s been an ongoing topic in the GNOME community about how developers can get some money for their apps. From a fixed price to pay-what-you-want or donations, getting people to pay for software as end users is not easy. This is true even if you’re selling software through a mainstream platform like Google Play or the Apple Appstore, let alone if you’re a Free Software developer and you are relying on donations from your users.

    Even if you’re willing to donate a couple of euros for supporting an app you’re about to install, you’ll have to go through the trouble of finding out how to make the donation. This may involve: 1) going to the app developer’s website; 2) finding out whether they accept donations; 3) hope they receive donations through a service you already use (PayPal, bank transfer, Bitcoin, etc.) and perform the donation.
    During GUADEC, Richard Hughes organized a discussion around the problems of getting donations through GNOME Software. And now the GNOME app center has a “donate” button for apps that declare a donation link.

More in Tux Machines

Announcing Season of KDE 2018

KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way. Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work. For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program. Read more

How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.) Read more

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.