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GNOME and KDE: System Settings Progress, Akademy Results, and More

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KDE
GNOME
  • System Settings Progress

    I would like to provide some information on working with System Settings. This is a big endeavor and not an easy one. System Settings is a good expression of the power of KDE and also the many influences that have shaped it over the years.

    Trying to untangle the work that has gone into System Settings requires time and patience. I have always been interested in working in revamping this UI. We worked with the team in the VDG on this some time ago, and altough there were many great and interesting changes, the scope of the work was too great. Therefore, we decided only to move forward with those things that were achievable at the time.

  • Akademy Results

    At the beginning of the summer I went to Akademy in Almeria. So what did it bring, in terms of development? I can point to the FreeBSD-on-KDE-Slimbook posts as one technical result of Akademy, although I suppose I could have just had the machine shipped to me, too. (There need to be more posts about the laptop, as FreeBSD support for it improves; I must admit I’ve been a little lax in hacking on that).

  • Move status icons to your GNOME top bar

    However, there are also free and open source apps with the same issues. These apps haven’t been updated to use newer features when installed in a GNOME environment like Fedora Workstation.

  • GTK, Python, WebKit and Latex Workshops on Fedora 26

    This afternoon, we did two workshops at PUCP, one to present and code in GTK and the other to work with Latex, each one lasted an hour. Thanks to the organizers of INFOSOFT 2017 for the opportunity to share free Software tools to people. This event was free to everyone and we did a volunteer job as a group to promote Fedora and the GNOMe project in our local community.

  • Paying for FOSS apps

    There’s been an ongoing topic in the GNOME community about how developers can get some money for their apps. From a fixed price to pay-what-you-want or donations, getting people to pay for software as end users is not easy. This is true even if you’re selling software through a mainstream platform like Google Play or the Apple Appstore, let alone if you’re a Free Software developer and you are relying on donations from your users.

    Even if you’re willing to donate a couple of euros for supporting an app you’re about to install, you’ll have to go through the trouble of finding out how to make the donation. This may involve: 1) going to the app developer’s website; 2) finding out whether they accept donations; 3) hope they receive donations through a service you already use (PayPal, bank transfer, Bitcoin, etc.) and perform the donation.
    During GUADEC, Richard Hughes organized a discussion around the problems of getting donations through GNOME Software. And now the GNOME app center has a “donate” button for apps that declare a donation link.

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