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GNOME: LAS GNOME, GNOME-Shell, and GUADEC

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GNOME
  • #LASGNOME

    This is a long overdue blog post, that should’ve, ideally, been written a week ago, while it was most fresh in my mind. From my own observations of everything that went on during the conference, together with the good feedbacks and reviews we received from the participants, I dare say the first Libre Application Summit, hosted by GNOME (“LAS GNOME”) transpired successfully. So I admit, after a week of keeping myself on my toes, I arrived home, and basked in the afterglow of the success of the very first edition of LAS GNOME.

  • Fedora26, jhbuild and gnome-shell

    Ok, so in my previous previous post I wrote about not being able to restore my build in time. Given the fact that reinstalling the OS would take more time, I took a shot at rebuilding gnome-shell (with the beloved jhbuild, of course) inside a virtual machine, on a Fedora26 OS.

    This was the first step towards fixing my issue. As you will see, this post aims at helping newcomers install gnome-shell on their machines by describing all the issues that I encountered while building.

    First thing you want to do is read the jhbuild guide that can be found here and then install jhbuild.

  • My first GUADEC experience

    One long plane ride and two trains later, I finally arrived in Karlsruhe, three evenings earlier than Day 1 of GUADEC since Cosimo was participating in the Board and AdBoard meetings. As we checked-in at the Achat Plaza Hotel, the first familiar face we saw was Jeff. I had been working on the Foundation’s FY 2015 Annual Report closely with Jeff, Zana and Nuritzi for the past few months and I was excited to get my hands on a printed copy of the report; Jeff actually checked in a ~20kg luggage filled with the reports!

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