Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux 4.13 Kernel Released

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds has gone ahead and released the Linux 4.13 kernel.

As of writing, he hasn't yet published anything to the kernel mailing list but the new kernel can be fetched via Git.

Read more

Official message

  • Linux 4.13

    So last week was actually somewhat eventful, but not enough to push me
    to delay 4.13.

    Most of the changes since rc7 are actually networking fixes, the bulk
    of them to various drivers. With apologies to the authors of said
    patches, they don't look all that interesting (which is definitely
    exactly what you want just before a release). Details in the appended
    shortlog.

    Note that the shortlog below is obviously only since rc7 - the _full_
    4.13 log is much too big to post and nobody sane would read it. So if
    you're interested in all the rest of it, get the git tree and limit
    the logs to the files you are interested in if you crave details.

    No, the excitement was largely in the mmu notification layer, where we
    had a fairly last-minute regression and some discussion about the
    problem. Lots of kudos to Jérôme Glisse for jumping on it, and
    implementing the fix.

    What's nice to see is that the regression pointed out a nasty and not
    very well documented (or thought out) part of the mmu notifiers, and
    the fix not only fixed the problem, but did so by cleaning up and
    documenting what the right behavior should be, and furthermore did so
    by getting rid of the problematic notifier and actually removing
    almost two hundred lines in the process.

    I love seeing those kinds of fixes. Better, smaller, code.

    The other excitement this week was purely personal, consisting of
    seven hours of pure agony due to a kidney stone. I'm all good, but it
    sure _felt_ a lot longer than seven hours, and I don't even want to
    imagine what it is for people that have had the experience drag out
    for longer. Ugh.

    Anyway, on to actual 4.13 issues.

    While we've had lots of changes all over (4.13 was not particularly
    big, but even a "solidly average" release is not exactly small), one
    very _small_ change merits some extra attention, because it's one of
    those very rare changes where we change behavior due to security
    issues, and where people may need to be aware of that behavior change
    when upgrading.

    This time it's not really a kernel security issue, but a generic
    protocol security issue.

    The change in question is simply changing the default cifs behavior:
    instead of defaulting to SMB 1.0 (which you really should not use:
    just google for "stop using SMB1" or similar), the default cifs mount
    now defaults to a rather more modern SMB 3.0.

    Now, because you shouldn't have been using SMB1 anyway, this shouldn't
    affect anybody. But guess what? It almost certainly does affect some
    people, because they blithely continued using SMB1 without really
    thinking about it.

    And you certainly _can_ continue to use SMB1, but due to the default
    change, now you need to be *aware* of it. You may need to add an
    explicit "vers=1.0" to your mount options in /etc/fstab or similar if
    you *really* want SMB1.

    But if the new default of 3.0 doesn't work (because you still use a
    pterodactyl as a windshield wiper), before you go all the way back to
    the bad old days and use that "vers=1.0", you might want to try
    "vers=2.1". Because let's face it, SMB1 is just bad, bad, bad.

    Anyway, most people won't notice at all. And the ones that do notice
    can check their current situation (just look at the output of "mount"
    and see if you have any cifs things there), and you really should
    update from the default even if you are *not* upgrading kernels.

    Ok, enough about that. It was literally a two-liner change top
    defaults - out of the million or so lines of the full 4.13 patch
    changing real code.

    Go get the new kernel,

    Linus

  • The 4.13 kernel is out

    Linus has released the 4.13 kernel, right on schedule. Headline features in this release include kernel hardening via structure layout randomization, native TLS protocol support, better huge-page swapping, improved handling of writeback errors, better asynchronous I/O support, better power management via next-interrupt prediction, the elimination of the DocBook toolchain for formatted documentation, and more. There is one other change that is called out explicitly in the announcement: "The change in question is simply changing the default cifs behavior: instead of defaulting to SMB 1.0 (which you really should not use: just google for 'stop using SMB1' or similar), the default cifs mount now defaults to a rather more modern SMB 3.0."

Linux 4.13 release coverage

  • Linux Kernel 4.13 Released By Linus Torvalds — Here Are The Biggest Features

    Linux kernel 4.12 was released in early July, which was the second biggest release in terms of commits. It came with the support for new AMD Vega graphics support. Following Linux kernel 4.12, Linux boss Linus Torvalds has released Linux kernel 4.13 after seven release candidates.

    The Linux Kernel Mailing List announcement of kernel 4.13 turned out to be a little bit personal as Torvalds had to go through “seven hours of pure agony due to a kidney stone.” He expressed relief as kernel 4.13 wasn’t delayed.

  • Linus Torvalds passed a kidney stone and then squeezed out Linux 4.13

    Linus Torvalds has released Linux 4.13 to a waiting world and in so doing detailed a tricky work week in which he endured “seven hours of pure agony due to a kidney stone”.

    “I'm all good, but it sure _felt_ a lot longer than seven hours,” he wrote on the Linux Kernel Mailing List, “and I don't even want to imagine what it is for people that have had the experience drag out for longer. Ugh.”

    Far happier news is that this release of the Linux Kernel emerged after the seven release candidates to which Torvalds aspires.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.