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Linux 4.13 Kernel Released

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Linux

Linus Torvalds has gone ahead and released the Linux 4.13 kernel.

As of writing, he hasn't yet published anything to the kernel mailing list but the new kernel can be fetched via Git.

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Official message

  • Linux 4.13

    So last week was actually somewhat eventful, but not enough to push me
    to delay 4.13.

    Most of the changes since rc7 are actually networking fixes, the bulk
    of them to various drivers. With apologies to the authors of said
    patches, they don't look all that interesting (which is definitely
    exactly what you want just before a release). Details in the appended
    shortlog.

    Note that the shortlog below is obviously only since rc7 - the _full_
    4.13 log is much too big to post and nobody sane would read it. So if
    you're interested in all the rest of it, get the git tree and limit
    the logs to the files you are interested in if you crave details.

    No, the excitement was largely in the mmu notification layer, where we
    had a fairly last-minute regression and some discussion about the
    problem. Lots of kudos to Jérôme Glisse for jumping on it, and
    implementing the fix.

    What's nice to see is that the regression pointed out a nasty and not
    very well documented (or thought out) part of the mmu notifiers, and
    the fix not only fixed the problem, but did so by cleaning up and
    documenting what the right behavior should be, and furthermore did so
    by getting rid of the problematic notifier and actually removing
    almost two hundred lines in the process.

    I love seeing those kinds of fixes. Better, smaller, code.

    The other excitement this week was purely personal, consisting of
    seven hours of pure agony due to a kidney stone. I'm all good, but it
    sure _felt_ a lot longer than seven hours, and I don't even want to
    imagine what it is for people that have had the experience drag out
    for longer. Ugh.

    Anyway, on to actual 4.13 issues.

    While we've had lots of changes all over (4.13 was not particularly
    big, but even a "solidly average" release is not exactly small), one
    very _small_ change merits some extra attention, because it's one of
    those very rare changes where we change behavior due to security
    issues, and where people may need to be aware of that behavior change
    when upgrading.

    This time it's not really a kernel security issue, but a generic
    protocol security issue.

    The change in question is simply changing the default cifs behavior:
    instead of defaulting to SMB 1.0 (which you really should not use:
    just google for "stop using SMB1" or similar), the default cifs mount
    now defaults to a rather more modern SMB 3.0.

    Now, because you shouldn't have been using SMB1 anyway, this shouldn't
    affect anybody. But guess what? It almost certainly does affect some
    people, because they blithely continued using SMB1 without really
    thinking about it.

    And you certainly _can_ continue to use SMB1, but due to the default
    change, now you need to be *aware* of it. You may need to add an
    explicit "vers=1.0" to your mount options in /etc/fstab or similar if
    you *really* want SMB1.

    But if the new default of 3.0 doesn't work (because you still use a
    pterodactyl as a windshield wiper), before you go all the way back to
    the bad old days and use that "vers=1.0", you might want to try
    "vers=2.1". Because let's face it, SMB1 is just bad, bad, bad.

    Anyway, most people won't notice at all. And the ones that do notice
    can check their current situation (just look at the output of "mount"
    and see if you have any cifs things there), and you really should
    update from the default even if you are *not* upgrading kernels.

    Ok, enough about that. It was literally a two-liner change top
    defaults - out of the million or so lines of the full 4.13 patch
    changing real code.

    Go get the new kernel,

    Linus

  • The 4.13 kernel is out

    Linus has released the 4.13 kernel, right on schedule. Headline features in this release include kernel hardening via structure layout randomization, native TLS protocol support, better huge-page swapping, improved handling of writeback errors, better asynchronous I/O support, better power management via next-interrupt prediction, the elimination of the DocBook toolchain for formatted documentation, and more. There is one other change that is called out explicitly in the announcement: "The change in question is simply changing the default cifs behavior: instead of defaulting to SMB 1.0 (which you really should not use: just google for 'stop using SMB1' or similar), the default cifs mount now defaults to a rather more modern SMB 3.0."

Linux 4.13 release coverage

  • Linux Kernel 4.13 Released By Linus Torvalds — Here Are The Biggest Features

    Linux kernel 4.12 was released in early July, which was the second biggest release in terms of commits. It came with the support for new AMD Vega graphics support. Following Linux kernel 4.12, Linux boss Linus Torvalds has released Linux kernel 4.13 after seven release candidates.

    The Linux Kernel Mailing List announcement of kernel 4.13 turned out to be a little bit personal as Torvalds had to go through “seven hours of pure agony due to a kidney stone.” He expressed relief as kernel 4.13 wasn’t delayed.

  • Linus Torvalds passed a kidney stone and then squeezed out Linux 4.13

    Linus Torvalds has released Linux 4.13 to a waiting world and in so doing detailed a tricky work week in which he endured “seven hours of pure agony due to a kidney stone”.

    “I'm all good, but it sure _felt_ a lot longer than seven hours,” he wrote on the Linux Kernel Mailing List, “and I don't even want to imagine what it is for people that have had the experience drag out for longer. Ugh.”

    Far happier news is that this release of the Linux Kernel emerged after the seven release candidates to which Torvalds aspires.

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