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today's leftovers

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  • Linux Journal September 2017
  • NetMarketShare: Linux doubles market share since December 2015 [Ed: This according to a Microsoft-connected firm]

    According to the latest stats on NetMarketShare, Linux now accounts for 3.37% of the operating system market. It has more than doubled its share since December 2015 and has seen a drastic rise over the last couple of summer months. Since 2015, Windows has largely stayed around the 90% mark while macOS has dropped from a high of 8% in October 2015 down to 5.94% in August.

    NetMarketShare’s stats include data on Windows, macOS, Linux, FreeBSD and OpenBSD; it’s presumed that Chrome OS factors into the Linux statistics because it runs the Linux kernel. Suppose that Chrome OS is included, this would explain why there has been such a bump for Linux in the month of August: It’s probably due to students or schools buying Chromebooks in time for the school year.

  • FLOSS Weekly 448: Hiawatha Web Server
  • It Doesn't Look Like A Ryzen/EPYC Thermal Driver Will Make It For Linux 4.14

    While the Ryzen CPUs have been available for a few months now and the higher-wattage Threadripper and EPYC processors are now available too, the Linux thermal driver remains missing in action and it's looking less likely that it will materialize for Linux 4.14.

    The Linux 4.14 merge window should open this weekend, unless the Linux 4.13 cycle is unexpectedly stretched by an additional week.

  • Realtek RTL8822BE Support Coming To Linux 4.14

    For those with a system containing the new Realtek RTL8822BE wireless chipset, initial support for it will be found with the upcoming Linux 4.14 LTS kernel.

    The RTL8822BE is a new ASIC from Realtek supporting 802.11ac, MU-MIMO, and Bluetooth 4.1. There are USB and PCI Express versions of this wireless adapter.

  • GNOME 3.26 Removes the Legacy System Tray — But Will You Miss It?

    GNOME 3.26 removes the legacy tray area still used by some desktops apps. We ask whether this decision is really as big of a deal as it sounds.

  • Prepare For Firefox +57 With These 10 Web Extensions

    Mozilla Firefox browser is moving to “web extensions” and is dropping support for the legacy XPCOM & XUL add-ons. This means that every single add-on you have on your browser won’t work with Firefox +57 unless it was rewritten using this new technology.

    This is bad news for a lot of us. Thousands of add-ons won’t be used anymore because of this. A lot of developers do not plan to invest more time in porting their add-ons into the new technology. However, things have to move on. Mozilla’s point of view is that it’s time to drop this legacy technology and move into more modern ways of creating add-ons.

  • The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.4.1 “fresh” and LibreOffice 5.3.6 “still”

    The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.4.1, the first minor release of the new LibreOffice 5.4 family, which was announced in early August, and LibreOffice 5.3.6, the sixth release of the mature LibreOffice 5.3 family, which was announced in January 2017.

    LibreOffice 5.4.1 represents the bleeding edge in term of features, and as such is targeted at technology enthusiasts and early adopters, while LibreOffice 5.3.6 is targeted at conservative users and enterprise deployments.

More in Tux Machines

Firefox takes a Quantum leap forward with new developer edition

Earlier this year we wrote about Project Quantum, Mozilla's work to modernize Firefox and rebuild it to handle the needs of the modern Web. Today, that work takes a big step toward the mainstream with the release of the new Firefox 57 developer edition. The old Firefox developer edition was based on the alpha-quality Aurora channel, which was two versions ahead of the stable version. In April, Mozilla scrapped the Aurora channel, and the developer edition moved to being based on the beta channel. The developer edition is used by a few hundred thousand users each month and is for the most part identical to the beta, except it has a different theme by default—a dark theme instead of the normal light one—and changes a few default settings in ways that developers tend to prefer. Read more

Today in Techrights

GNU/Linux in Ataribox

  • Ataribox will run Linux and AMD custom processor, will cost $300
    In June, Atari declared itself "back in the hardware business" with the announcement of the Ataribox—a retro-styled PC tech-based console. One month later it emerged Atari plans to crowdfund the project, and now we have some hard facts on cost, and what's under its hood. Speaking to VentureBeat, the Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac says an Indiegogo funding campaign will launch this year, and that the final product will ship in spring of 2018. When it does, it'll cost between $250—$300 and will boast an AMD custom processor with Radeon graphics.
  • Atari are launching a new gaming system, the 'Ataribox' and it runs Linux
    Another Linux-based gaming system is coming, this time from Atari. The Ataribox [Official Site] will run on an AMD processor and it sounds quite interesting.

SUSE on Storage