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today's leftovers: Jobs, Kolab, Ocado, DH2i, Benchmark, Games and Linux Lite 3.6

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  • Employers Seek Open Source Expertise -- But You Should Already Know That

    The latest insight about demand for open source expertise among employers comes from the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report, which was sponsored by the Linux Foundation. Most previous iterations of the report were called the Linux Jobs Report, but they focused on the same themes.

  • Kolab for Open Power

    Among a variety of deliberations concerning the security and transparency of a little Kolab thing running anywhere — at home, rented space or hybrid cloud — this post is about the transparency of the hardware layer, and our ongoing efforts to make that so.

    We have said what, why and how on LWN, at events like FOSDEM (with a supplemental interview), at FSFE Summits, various other occasions, and perhaps your next opportunity to get acquainted with the message is at the OpenPOWER Summit in Barcelona — when I say “we”, I mean one of our most widely respected and prominent people, Georg Greve.

  • Ocado Technology's Kubermesh

    Instead of relying on servers concentrated in one large data center, the new Kubermesh is designed to simplify data-center architectures for smart factories by elegantly and cost effectively leveraging a distributed network of computing nodes spread across the enterprise. Developed by Ocado Technology, a division of Ocado (the world's largest online-only supermarket), the Kubermesh package uses container-based technology and the Kubernetes system to implement an on-premises private cloud architecture in which desktop computers can be configured as nodes supporting the compute or storage functionality typically delivered by high-performance servers in a data center.

  • DH2i Embraces Linux Containers as Enterprise Market Evolves

    DH2i is adding support for Linux-based containers to its traditionally Windows-centric container management platform, citing increased demand from enterprise customers.

    The company’s software is basically a container-as-a-service (CaaS) platform that now includes support for a broader range of container hosts. That expanded platform uses a unified interface to support various Linux-based permutations along with Microsoft container services.

  • Power Use, RAM + Boot Times With Unity, Xfce, GNOME, LXDE, Budgie & KDE Plasma

    One of the first follow-on requests from this morning's Razer Blade Stealth Linux testing was for on top of all the other data-sets shared in that article to also look at the RAM usage, battery power draw, and boot times for the different desktop options on Ubuntu 17.04. As the request came in from a Phoronix Premium supporter, I jumped on that and here are some of those numbers.

  • And Now for Something Completely Different: Broforce
  • F1 2017 reviewed: Weeks of fun for the racing fan
  • Linux Lite 3.6 Lightweight Distro Released With New Features — Download Now

    Linux Lite is often cited as one of the favorite newcomers in the overcrowded world of Linux distributions. It’s known to deliver a lightweight Linux desktop experience, coupled with a beginner-friendly working environment.

    Earlier this year in April, developers shipped Linux Lite 3.4 with Ubuntu 16.04.2 base and Linux kernel 4.4. Now, after five months of development work, Linux Lite 3.6 has been released.

More in Tux Machines

Security: VPNFilter, Encryption in GNU/Linux, Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints

  • [Crackers] infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware

    VPNFilter—as the modular, multi-stage malware has been dubbed—works on consumer-grade routers made by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and on network-attached storage devices from QNAP, Cisco researchers said in an advisory. It’s one of the few pieces of Internet-of-things malware that can survive a reboot. Infections in at least 54 countries have been slowly building since at least 2016, and Cisco researchers have been monitoring them for several months. The attacks drastically ramped up during the past three weeks, including two major assaults on devices located in Ukraine. The spike, combined with the advanced capabilities of the malware, prompted Cisco to release Wednesday’s report before the research is completed.

  • Do Not Use sha256crypt / sha512crypt - They're Dangerous

    I'd like to demonstrate why I think using sha256crypt or sha512crypt on current GNU/Linux operating systems is dangerous, and why I think the developers of GLIBC should move to scrypt or Argon2, or at least bcrypt or PBKDF2.

  • Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints
    I investigated an rr bug report and discovered an annoying Intel CPU bug that affects rr replay using data watchpoints. It doesn't seem to be hit very often in practice, which is good because I don't know any way to work around it. It turns out that the bug is probably covered by an existing Intel erratum for Skylake and Kaby Lake (and probably later generations, but I'm not sure), which I even blogged about previously! However, the erratum does not mention watchpoints and the bug I've found definitely depends on data watchpoints being set. I was able to write a stand-alone testcase to characterize the bug. The issue seems to be that if a rep stos (and probably rep movs) instruction writes between 1 and 64 bytes (inclusive), and you have a read or write watchpoint in the range [64, 128) bytes from the start of the writes (i.e., not triggered by the instruction), then one spurious retired conditional branch is (usually) counted. The alignment of the writes does not matter, and it's not related to speculative execution.

In Memoriam: Robin "Roblimo" Miller, a Videographer and Free Software Champion

Videographer Robin Roblimo Miller

Robin "Roblimo" Miller was a clever, friendly, and very amicable individual who everyone I know has plenty of positive things to say about. I had the pleasure of speaking to him for several hours about anything from personal life and professional views. Miller was a very knowledgeable person whose trade as a journalist and video producer I often envied. I have seen him facing his critics in his capacity as a journalist over a decade ago when he arranged a debate about OOXML (on live radio). Miller, to me, will always be remembered as a strong-minded and investigative journalist who "did the right thing" as the cliché goes, irrespective of financial gain -- something which can sometimes be detrimental to one's longterm health. Miller sacrificed many of his later years to a cause worth fighting for. This is what we ought to remember him for. Miller was - and always will be - a FOSS hero.

May everything you fought for be fulfilled, Mr. Miller. I already miss you.

Today in Techrights

Tux Machines Privacy Statement

Summary: Today, May 25th, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into full effect; we hereby make a statement on privacy AS a matter of strict principle, this site never has and never will accumulate data on visitors (e.g. access logs) for longer than 28 days. The servers are configured to permanently delete all access data after this period of time. No 'offline' copies are being made. Temporary logging is only required in case of DDOS attacks and cracking attempts -- the sole purpose of such access. Additionally, we never have and never will sell any data pertaining to anything. We never received demands for such data from authorities; even if we had, we would openly declare this (publicly, a la Canary) and decline to comply. Privacy is extremely important to us, which is why pages contain little or no cross-site channels (such as Google Analytics, 'interactive' buttons for 'social' media etc.) and won't be adding any. Google may be able to 'see' what pages people visit because of Google Translate (top left of every page), but that is not much worse than one's ISP 'seeing' the same thing. We are aware of this caveat. Shall readers have any further questions on such matters, do not hesitate to contact us.