Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Feds to fight the zombies

Filed under
Security

The FTC and more than 30 of its counterparts abroad are planning to contact Internet service providers and urge them to pay more attention to what their customers are doing online. Among the requests: identifying customers with suspicious e-mailing patterns, quarantining those computers and offering help in cleaning the zombie code off the hapless PCs.

To be sure, computers infected by zombie programs and used to churn out spam are a real threat to the future of e-mail. One report by security firm Sophos found that compromised PCs are responsible for 40 percent of the world's spam--and that number seems to be heading up, not down.

But government pressure--even well-intentioned--on Internet providers to monitor their users raises some important questions.

Will ISPs merely count the number of outbound e-mail messages, or actually peruse the content of e-mail correspondence? E-mail eavesdropping is limited by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act in the United States, but what about other countries without such laws? If these steps don't stop zombie-bots, will the government come back with formal requirements instead of mere suggestions the next time around?

The FTC said that its advice should not be alarming. "I think our recommendations are intended to provide flexibility by ISPs to implement them to the extent they can," Markus Heyder, an FTC legal adviser, said on Friday. "We have vetted them extensively with other partners and industry members."

Heyder said the commission plans to send letters to ISPs outlining the suggested antispam steps: "This is intended to provide a range of possible measures that can be taken if appropriate."

The FTC also wants Internet providers to prevent e-mail from leaving their network unless it flows through their own internal servers. That makes spam zombies easier to catch. That technique is called blocking port 25, the port number used by the venerable Simple Mail Transport Protocol.

Full Story.

Again - the eyes should be on Microsoft

If Micorsoft would secure their operating system this crap wouldnt be happening.

I know

I know, I know what you mean. It's ridiculous what the internet environment has come to due to the insecurity of the microsoft operating systems. But place blame where due, they are only an enabler, the assholes responsible are the assholes responsible. You know what I mean? Just cuz I leave my front door unlocked don't mean it's okay for someone to come in and swipe my stereo.
----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Git 2.2.1 Released To Fix Critical Security Issue

Today's Git vulnerability affects those using the Git client on case-insensitive file-systems. On case-insensitive platforms like Windows and OS X, committing to .Git/config could overwrite the user's .git/config and could lead to arbitrary code execution. Fortunately with most Phoronix readers out there running Linux, this isn't an issue thanks to case-sensitive file-systems. Read more

Ubuntu 15.04 Alpha 1 For Its Various Flavors

While Ubuntu itself no longer puts out alpha/beta releases in favor of just testing out the daily Live ISOs, the various Ubuntu flavors still participating in the traditional release process have done their first alpha releases this afternoon for Ubuntu 15.04. Read more

Robolinux 7.7.1 LXDE Runs Windows Apps with Stealth VM

Robolinux 7.7.1, a fast and easy-to-use Linux distribution based on Debian has just received a new desktop environment, LXDE, making this the third second flavor of the distribution. Read more

Jolla's Sailfish OS Update 10 Is Now Available

The tenth update to Jolla's Sailfish mobile operating system is now available. This update is version 1.1.1.26 and is codenamed Vaarainjärvi. This latest update to Jolla's Sailfish OS includes the device lock now supporting alpha-numeric codes, copy-paste support between Android and native Sailfish apps, Mail app improvements, new overlays for maps, search improvements, unification to the accounts framework, new MMS settings, UI improvements, and an assortment of other improvements. Read more