Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Apple considers Intel for Macs - or not

Filed under
Mac

Apple Computer Inc. has been in talks that could lead to a decision soon to use Intel Corp. chips in its Macintosh computer line, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday.

The report, citing two industry executives with knowledge of recent discussions between the companies, said Apple will agree to use Intel chips.

Neither company would confirm the report and an Apple spokeswoman told the Journal she would characterize it as "rumor and speculation."

It was unclear whether such a move would signal a large-scale shift away from chips made by IBM, Apple's longtime supplier, the report said.

Apple could choose to add some Intel-based models to its product line or make a complete shift to Intel's chip technology in what would be seen as a serious blow to IBM's microprocessor business, the newspaper said.

Adopting Intel chips would help ensure that future Macintosh systems could meet the price and performance of products from tough rivals such as Dell Inc.

Apple's pricing, which has often been higher than rivals, could become more competitive if Intel provides the kind of marketing subsidies it has given to other computer makers, the newspaper said.

Apple sells only about three million computers a year -- a small portion of the estimated 200 million sold globally.

But for Intel, winning over Apple would be a prestigious endorsement from one of technology's most influential trend-setters and could associate the chipmaker with Apple's hugely popular iPod music player.

Despite significant performance gains in recent years, the PowerPC platform still falls short of the outright speed claims of Intel and its main rival AMD. Although this may not affect real world performance - too many other factors have to be taken into consideration - it has a big influence on consumers' perceptions. Recently, Apple was unable to fulfil a promise to have 3GHz G5 chips within a year of the unveiling of the G5-based Power Mac.

Moreover switching to Intel could result in cost savings and, consequently, further price cuts. Intel also has power saving technologies that could be deployed in Apple's key notebook models, the iBook and PowerBooks.

Any decision to go with Intel will require some rewriting of the OS X code. However it is highly unlikely that any changes will enable it to run on any Intel-based PC; Apple will ensure that it is hardware specific though hackers would doubtless be keen to get their hands on it.

Rumours of secret versions of Mac operating systems that run on Intel hardware have been circulating for years. They have been given some substance by former Apple employees who have suggested that it remains a fall-back option should the PowerPC platform fail.

Of course there is every chance that this is all a smokescreen and next month, at Apple's Worldwide Developer Conference., CEO Steve Jobs will unveil a 3GHz Power Mac and a G5 PowerBook.

Source.
Source.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming (Mighty No. 9 and Wine)

  • “Mighty No. 9” Mac & Linux Versions Released on Steam
    The creators of the Kickstarter-funded video game, Mighty No. 9, announced on Thursday they released the Mac and Linux versions of the game. This announcement comes just a little over two months after the game was delivered to North American and Asian backers via PS4, Xbox One, and PC. The team revealed that both Mac and Linux versions are now available on Steam.
  • Mac and Linux Versions of Mighty No. 9 Released
  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.4 Is Now Available
    The Wine team released today fifth stable release of 1.8 branch of Wine. Version 1.8.4 has many small changes including 50 bugfixes. This stable release contains bugfixes, new cards were added to GPU description table, new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

Android Leftovers

  • iPhones are much more likely to 'fail' than Androids
    Apple's once glittering reputation for quality took quite a few hits during the last few years, especially when it comes to iOS, the software that runs on iPhones. In some cases, recurrent software bugs have plagued users with issues such as the inability to use Wi-Fi, frequent crashes, and ridiculously short battery life. This week reports surfaced about a hardware flaw that makes some iPhone 6 screens inoperable. (Apple hasn't confirmed any related problems.) It's hard to tell how widespread some of these issues are, but a new report from a company that monitors smartphone quality suggests iPhones are far more likely to "fail" or suffer serious glitches than Android phones. The Blancco Technology Group says it collected performance data from millions of mobile phones during the second quarter of 2016, and it found that iPhones had an overall failure rate of 58 percent, compared to just 35 percent failure for Android devices. The term "failure" doesn’t necessarily mean that the phone has become a brick, according to Blancco. Instead, it means the device or software running on the device suffered some serious problem.
  • Maru OS is now open source (Turns Android phones into Linux desktops)
    Maru OS is a software project that lets you plug an Android phone into an external display to run desktop Linux software. First unveiled earlier this year, the software is very much a work-in-progress. Initially it only supported one phone: the Google Nexus 5. But things could get a lot more interesting soon, because the developer behind Maru OS has finished open sourcing the project and a group of developers are planning to start porting the software to run on additional devices.
  • Maru OS wants to turn your phone into a desktop with its latest open source build
    Not to be confused with Maru the adorable YouTube cat, Maru OS, the bite-sized Android add-on that turns your phone into a desktop, just went open source. Maru OS doesn’t change much about the way your phone operates on its own, but once you connect a desktop monitor via a slimport cable, Maru really comes to life. When connected to a display, Maru OS allows you to run a desktop Linux environment straight from your phone. Your phone is still a phone, it’ll take calls, send texts and do everything else it normally does, even while it’s connected to a desktop monitor running Linux on the side. It’s an interesting concept, but it’s still very much a work in progress. Today’s announcement could help move things along for Maru.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Oracle reveals Java Applet API deprecation plan
    Oracle has revealed its interim plan to help Java devs deal with browser-makers' imminent banishment of plug-ins. Years of bugs in Java, Flash and other plugins have led browser-makers to give up on plugins. Apple recently decided that its Safari browser will just pretend Java, Flash and Silverlight aren't installed. Google has announced it will soon just not run any Flash content in its Chrome browser. Oracle saw this movement coming and in January 2016 announced it would “deprecate the Java browser plugin in JDK 9”
  • Marist College, Rockefeller Archive Center Partner on Open Source Digital Archival Tech
    Marist College and the Rockefeller Archive Center (RAC) in New York have partnered to develop and implement an open source digital records management system to support researchers, archival staff and the broader archival community. [...] At the same time, one of the goals of Marist College "is to offer open source technologies, such as Liferay and Blockchain, to like-minded organizations that create a lasting impact on our community," said Bill Thirsk, vice president of information technology and CIO at the college, in a news release.
  • Facebook is scrambling to catch up to Google in open-sourcing AI code
    In artificial intelligence research, free code garners goodwill from the community, talent, and bragging rights. So it’s no surprise that many of the companies investing in AI, like Facebook and Google, are racing to make their code open source early and often.
  • Open Source AI is On Fire, and Facebook Has the Latest Contributions
    In the latest move, Facebook is open sourcing three tools that the company uses internally for machine vision.
  • New Open Source Milestones for Microsoft [Ed: Puff pieces distracting from patent attacks on Linux]
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: August 26th
  • The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Stefano Zacchiroli of Software Heritage
    Software Heritage is a recently announced non-profit initiative to archive, organize, and share all publicly available software source code. Stefano Zacchiroli is a co-founder and current CTO of the Software Heritage project. He is a Board Director of the Open Source Initiative, member of FSF's High Priority Projects committee, and former 3-times Debian Project Leader.
  • Uganda to cut costs with open source software
    Some of the FOSS customizable applications on the market include Word Press, Mozilla Firefox, and open office among others. The applications can be used to create websites, marketing business ideas, and conduct online business. Most startups find it difficult to break through but creation of an online presence has made some business gain faster traction. James Saaka, the NITA-U executive director, said government struggles to pay licenses to use programmes from Microsoft, Oracle which is so expensive to maintain.
  • Preserving languages and cultures in India: The birth of the Tulu Wikipedia
    After eight years of effort and outreach, the Tulu language Wikipedia has gone live. Wikimedia contributors play a key role in preserving languages and cultures, and tools like the Wikimedia Incubator help new projects like the Tulu Wikipedia get started. Tulu is a language spoken by three to five million people in the states of Karnataka and Kerala in the southwest and south India respectively, and by some people in the US and in Gulf countries. Tulu Wikipedia is the 294th Wikipedia and the 23rd South Asian language Wikipedia. The Tulu Wikipedia grew in the Wikimedia Incubator for about eight years before going online. So far, 198 editors have contributed 1285 articles, and the active editors that have more than 5 edits per month in the project number between 5-10 on average.