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Red Hat and Fedora: Financial News, DNF, Fedora 27 Features, and Fedora Parties

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) PT Lowered to $96.00 at Mizuho
  • Tale of the Ticker: Red Hat Inc (RHT) Moves on Volume
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Stake Reduced by Gagnon Advisors LLC
  • Trading Options: Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) : A Clever Covered Call
  • What Is DNF Package Manager And How To Use It

    A package file is an archive which contains the binaries and other resources that make software and the pre and post installation scripts. They also provide the information regarding dependencies and other packages required for the installation and running of the software.
     In the Linux world, there are two main types of packaging formats, .deb for those in the Debian and Ubuntu world and the .rpm for the Fedora, RHEL and CentOS. These formats also have their own tools for package management. The .debs use apt or aptitude and dpkg while the .rpms have been using YUM, at least until recently. Fedora recently replaced YUM with their new package manager, DNF. Yup, they built from the ground up a new package manager, the Dandified YUM (DNF), to replace it. ​

  • Fedora 27 Approves More Features: Flatpaks, NSS, RPM 4.14, Installer

    At Friday's Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) there were yet more features approved for the current Fedora Linux development cycle.

  • The little bit different Fedora 26 Release Party – Part 1

    Since Fedora 21 we had not really a Fedora Release Party here in Phnom Penh, Fedora 21 we did at Development Innovations which was wonderful supported by Greta Greathouse the head of this US AID driven institution. But well in Asia an not to mention non-foss oriented company showed a behavior like in Europe 25 years ago. So DI has a new boss, which is lesser FOSS oriented. So we had to find a new place. For Fedora 24 the time frame was to short for me to organize something and Fedora 25 was an epic fail on the Royal University Phnom Penh, which cancelled the party, an hour before it.

    So this time I going with Passerelles Numerique as partner, which will not just provide the room and helps eqipement and this is what makes this Release Party a bit different from the “normal” ones.

  • What is happening in Fedora?

    The last week we had a Fedora Activity Day for LATAM Ambassadors, it was in Cusco – Perú, so, why was celebrated this event?

    I can tell you why in some words, new Fedora people (people, not fedorapeople.org) don’t know  how to do things inside the community, how to collaborate, how to request sponsorship, how to be aware when spending Fedora resources… etc, and… the old people are busy now and can’t spend much time in Fedora.

    It was an Alex Oviedo’s (alexove) initiative and we had six representatives for LATAM countries x3mboy from Chile, asoliard from Argentina, josereyesjdi from Panama, itamarjp from Brazil, searchsam from Nicaragua, me (tonet666p) from Perú and bexelbie from Czech Republic (yes, is not LATAM but he was helping us).

  • FAD Latam 2017: x3mboy’s Event report

More in Tux Machines

Games: Oxygen Not Included, Proton, GDScript

  • The first DLC for Oxygen Not Included sounds huge, free update soon too

    Klei Entertainment have been busy working behind the scenes on the next free update and first expansion for Oxygen Not Included and they've detailed what's coming. First, the free update coming within the next few days should fix plenty of issues, including one involving infinite digging which sounds annoying. More exciting is the DLC though, it's sounding like it's going to be massive!

  • VKD3D-Proton is the new official Direct3D 12 to Vulkan layer for Proton

    VKD3D was originally a project created directly by the Wine team, the compatibility layer that Proton is built upon. However, the original founder passed away and it seems Valve-funded developers are taking the torch to push it much further. It's actually been a thing for a while but today they adjusted the name of their project as VKD3D-Proton, to give it some official status plus preventing any naming conflicts elsewhere and just be clear about their goals. They're going for supporting the "full" Direct3D 12 API on top of Vulkan, with an aim of both performance and compatibility using modern Vulkan extensions and features, so this comes at the expense of compatibility with older drivers and GPUs. They're also not looking to keep backwards compatibility with the original vkd3d.

  • GDScript progress report: Type checking is back

    After completing the new tokenizer and parser as mentioned in the previous reports, I started working on the code analyzer, which is responsible for type checking and also for used for other features like warnings and some optimizations. This was done before as a second pass inside the parser but it was now moved to another class to make it clear that it doesn't happen at the same pass thus avoiding issues with functions being called out of order (which happened by a few contributions that missed this detail).

today's howtos

NomadBSD 1.3.2 is now available!

We are pleased to present the release of NomadBSD 1.3.2. Read more

Python Programming

  • Pure Python Configuration Management With PyInfra

    Building and managing servers is a challenging task. Configuration management tools provide a framework for handling the various tasks involved, but many of them require learning a specific syntax and toolchain. PyInfra is a configuration management framework that embraces the familiarity of Pure Python, allowing you to build your own integrations easily and package it all up using the same tools that you rely on for your applications. In this episode Nick Barrett explains why he built it, how it is implemented, and the ways that you can start using it today. He also shares his vision for the future of the project and you can get involved. If you are tired of writing mountains of YAML to set up your servers then give PyInfra a try today.

  • GraphQL - ORM

    GraphQL aims to overcome REST's shortcomings through a flexible query language, and succeeds in doing so on the client side. But on the server side, GraphQL resolvers have effectively recreated the same over- and under- fetching problems that have long plagued ORMs. The fact that ORMs remain popular despite of their inefficiency is a testament to the benefits of having in-memory objects behave consistently. There is no such trade-off for server-side GraphQL, where the only point of the objects is to be immediately serialized. The so-called N+1 problem is generally acknowledged in the GraphQL community, but this article will argue only the symptoms are being addressed with workarounds like dataloader.

  • Massive memory overhead: Numbers in Python and how NumPy helps

    Those numbers can easily fit in a 64-bit integer, so one would hope Python would store those million integers in no more than ~8MB: a million 8-byte objects. In fact, Python uses more like 35MB of RAM to store these numbers. Why? Because Python integers are objects, and objects have a lot of memory overhead. Let’s see what’s going on under the hood, and then how using NumPy can get rid of this overhead.s

  • Can Anybody Become a Data Scientist?

    Introduction to Programming with Python is my first stop on this journey. RMOTR co-founder Santiago Basulto leads this course and, boy, does he cover a lot.

  • Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) in Python 3

    Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a method of structuring a program by bundling related properties and behaviors into individual objects. In this tutorial, you’ll learn the basics of object-oriented programming in Python. Conceptually, objects are like the components of a system. Think of a program as a factory assembly line of sorts. At each step of the assembly line a system component processes some material, ultimately transforming raw material into a finished product. An object contains data, like the raw or preprocessed materials at each step on an assembly line, and behavior, like the action each assembly line component performs.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC 2020 Blog Post (#3)
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC Weekly Blog #3
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: I'm Not Drowning On My Own
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Phase 2 - Weekly Check-in 6
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Blog Post #3
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check In - 5
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #6