Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

There is no Oracle Linux

Filed under
Linux

Repeat after me: "There is no Oracle Linux." I don't care how many times you hear stock analysts say that Oracle is about to launch its own Linux. It's just not going to happen.

The latest example of wishful thinking comes from Jefferies & Co. analyst Katherine Egbert, who wrote on October 13, "Our independent checks in the past two weeks indicate that Oracle seems to be close to introducing its own software 'stack.'"

Jefferies, an investment bank, then cut its price target on Red Hat from $24 to $21. Red Hat's stock price then fell more than 7 percent that day. Since then it's been continuing to fall.

This is, by my count, the third time that the "Oracle is going to come out with its own Linux" rumor has surfaced. And, of course, there have been variations on the theme, such as: Oracle is going to buy Red Hat, Novell, or Ubuntu.

I've had enough of this nonsense. Oracle isn't going to buy a Linux company to make its own distribution, and the company isn't going to make its very own Linux.

Here are my latest reasons why this is science-fiction.

Full Story.

Oracle Isn't a Linux Company

I'm usually not one for bashing analysts, but a recent report from Jefferies & Co. -- which suggests that Oracle will soon enter the Linux business -- borders on the preposterous.

My problem isn't with analyst Katherine Egbert's sources, or her conclusion that Oracle is talking with the makers of Ubuntu Linux about working more closely together. My problem is that she believes the collaboration could result in an Oracle-branded Linux appliance. Frankly, I think that's crazy.

Oracle has built a thriving network of third parties that help it to deliver software. A Linux appliance might as well be a Linux server in that it would have to at least be able to run Oracle's core database applications. And that, naturally, would pit Larry against his best server allies. I refuse to believe Ellison is that stupid.

More likely to me is Egbert's second thesis, which says that Oracle could bundle Ubuntu Linux in a stack of software designed to run on any server.

And yet I find even this scenario somewhat difficult to believe.

Full Story.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Detailed change log for deepin 15.4 RC

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users. After public test of deepin 15.4 Beta, we have received a lot of suggestions and feedback, we adopted part of them and fixed a lot of problems. Read more

GNOME 3.24: New Linux desktop is fast, responsive

I’ve been a fan of the work of the GNOME team for quite some time. They put together one heck of an excellent Linux desktop environment. But of late, I’ve found myself gravitating towards some of the more lightweight environments. MATE (which is a forked version of GNOME 2) and xmonad. I like my systems to be light on resource usage and highly responsive—those are two absolutely critical things for the way I use my computers. With this week’s release of GNOME 3.24, I decided to jump back into the world of modern GNOME desktops and kick the tires again. In order to give it the best possible shot, I did a clean install of openSUSE Tumbleweed (the rolling release version of openSUSE) and then installed GNOME 3.24 on top of it. (Side note: 3.24 was not yet available in the default repositories when I wrote this article, but it should be shortly.) Read more Also: Applying to Outreachy and GSoC for Fedora and GNOME

OpenSuse Leap Reinforces Linux Faith

Leap is a solid performer. I had no trouble installing it on MBR and EFI systems. Secure Boot tends to be buggy with some configurations, but it was incident-free with this installation. The bootloader handles multiboot with other Linux distributions or Windows fairly trouble-free. Installation is routine, thanks to the graphical format used. Only 64-bit versions are available for x86 computers, which limits access to legacy hardware in the 32-bit machines. ARM ports are available if you can track them down through the project's wiki. Read more

Modular, open source robotics kit lets you build your own 3D printer

Plugg.ee Labs’s Cortex-M3 based “JuicyBoard” robotics kit is designed for building stepper motor controlled devices like 3D printers or CNC routers. The JuicyBoard has surpassed its modest funding goals on Crowd Supply, providing a modular, open source development kit for stepper motor oriented devices such as 3D printers and CNC routers. Built around an NXP LPC1769 Cortex-M3 MCU, the kits are available starting at $179, with shipments due June 15. Read more