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There is no Oracle Linux

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Linux

Repeat after me: "There is no Oracle Linux." I don't care how many times you hear stock analysts say that Oracle is about to launch its own Linux. It's just not going to happen.

The latest example of wishful thinking comes from Jefferies & Co. analyst Katherine Egbert, who wrote on October 13, "Our independent checks in the past two weeks indicate that Oracle seems to be close to introducing its own software 'stack.'"

Jefferies, an investment bank, then cut its price target on Red Hat from $24 to $21. Red Hat's stock price then fell more than 7 percent that day. Since then it's been continuing to fall.

This is, by my count, the third time that the "Oracle is going to come out with its own Linux" rumor has surfaced. And, of course, there have been variations on the theme, such as: Oracle is going to buy Red Hat, Novell, or Ubuntu.

I've had enough of this nonsense. Oracle isn't going to buy a Linux company to make its own distribution, and the company isn't going to make its very own Linux.

Here are my latest reasons why this is science-fiction.

Full Story.

Oracle Isn't a Linux Company

I'm usually not one for bashing analysts, but a recent report from Jefferies & Co. -- which suggests that Oracle will soon enter the Linux business -- borders on the preposterous.

My problem isn't with analyst Katherine Egbert's sources, or her conclusion that Oracle is talking with the makers of Ubuntu Linux about working more closely together. My problem is that she believes the collaboration could result in an Oracle-branded Linux appliance. Frankly, I think that's crazy.

Oracle has built a thriving network of third parties that help it to deliver software. A Linux appliance might as well be a Linux server in that it would have to at least be able to run Oracle's core database applications. And that, naturally, would pit Larry against his best server allies. I refuse to believe Ellison is that stupid.

More likely to me is Egbert's second thesis, which says that Oracle could bundle Ubuntu Linux in a stack of software designed to run on any server.

And yet I find even this scenario somewhat difficult to believe.

Full Story.

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