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top 3 reasons why I prefer KDE

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KDE

KDE just got 10 years old! The K Desktop Environment, is “one of” the best (the “one of” was put in order to stop a flame war in my blog). KDE has been crucial in introducing Linux to the Desktop, true a GNOME based distribution, Ubuntu has the taken the reign now (I believe this was due to marketing and hype), but KDE based distributions, Fedora, Kubuntu etc are not too far behind. Its been now 5 years that I’ve been using Linux, my first distribution was Redhat 7.2, which was running GNOME, and KDE had a similar look and feel in Redhat. So I couldn’t get excited about Linux at all, it was a very boring interface for me. But in a random surfing session I came across screen shots of Slackware, which of course ships with unmodified sources, and the screen shots really appealed to me, I downloaded Slackware, and from that moment I’ve never looked to any other distribution, and use Slackware with KDE exclusively. So what is it that I really like KDE?

1. KDE look and feel

Full Story.

I just wish Kde would stop pushing Konqueror in my face

This gets my goat and it's an issue that keeps arising and may yet persuade me to drop Kde. Kde insists on using Konqueror for just about every link anywhere unless you go to extra trouble to stop it.

Before I discovered how to avoid this, it used to cache web pages whenever I clicked on a web link. Firefox, as the default browser, would then be relegated to opening the cached copy instead of the original page.

The latest stupidity is that a link to a wav file, which behaves as expected on other systems, opens Konqueror which promptly crashes, probably because it is not built to play wav files.

For seekers only

default browser

xanthon wrote:
This gets my goat and it's an issue that keeps arising and may yet persuade me to drop Kde. Kde insists on using Konqueror for just about every link anywhere unless you go to extra trouble to stop it.

you are not setting it up correctly, not only do you need to make firefox the default browser, you also need to associate it with html and xml files. after that, all kde applications will use firefox for links instead of konqueror.

Associating browser

Associating firefox to those file types is not enough. You have to add %u to the menu command.

It isn't just the browser though. I experimented with a hyperlink in a Calc spreadsheet. The link was to a .wav file. It seems that on a Linux OS, you need additional software for sound or video but, in any case, on Kde, Konqueror gets into the act again, then crashes.

I'd like a file browser that is just a file browser, not an intrusive task manager.

For seekers only

And another thing - losing non-kde file associations

This gets my goat as well. File-Roller, in my experience, is a much better tool for opening and extracting archives than Ark.

Almost every time I want to use File-Roller, I have to re-associate it with the archive type. This seems reminiscent of M$, deliberately sabotaging efforts to use applications from other sources.

For seekers only

re: file associations

I've seen this happen with me too, but usually only after upgrading. Usually, once I've set an association, it'll stay in place until something big changes.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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