Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

top 3 reasons why I prefer KDE

Filed under
KDE

KDE just got 10 years old! The K Desktop Environment, is “one of” the best (the “one of” was put in order to stop a flame war in my blog). KDE has been crucial in introducing Linux to the Desktop, true a GNOME based distribution, Ubuntu has the taken the reign now (I believe this was due to marketing and hype), but KDE based distributions, Fedora, Kubuntu etc are not too far behind. Its been now 5 years that I’ve been using Linux, my first distribution was Redhat 7.2, which was running GNOME, and KDE had a similar look and feel in Redhat. So I couldn’t get excited about Linux at all, it was a very boring interface for me. But in a random surfing session I came across screen shots of Slackware, which of course ships with unmodified sources, and the screen shots really appealed to me, I downloaded Slackware, and from that moment I’ve never looked to any other distribution, and use Slackware with KDE exclusively. So what is it that I really like KDE?

1. KDE look and feel

Full Story.

I just wish Kde would stop pushing Konqueror in my face

This gets my goat and it's an issue that keeps arising and may yet persuade me to drop Kde. Kde insists on using Konqueror for just about every link anywhere unless you go to extra trouble to stop it.

Before I discovered how to avoid this, it used to cache web pages whenever I clicked on a web link. Firefox, as the default browser, would then be relegated to opening the cached copy instead of the original page.

The latest stupidity is that a link to a wav file, which behaves as expected on other systems, opens Konqueror which promptly crashes, probably because it is not built to play wav files.

For seekers only

default browser

xanthon wrote:
This gets my goat and it's an issue that keeps arising and may yet persuade me to drop Kde. Kde insists on using Konqueror for just about every link anywhere unless you go to extra trouble to stop it.

you are not setting it up correctly, not only do you need to make firefox the default browser, you also need to associate it with html and xml files. after that, all kde applications will use firefox for links instead of konqueror.

Associating browser

Associating firefox to those file types is not enough. You have to add %u to the menu command.

It isn't just the browser though. I experimented with a hyperlink in a Calc spreadsheet. The link was to a .wav file. It seems that on a Linux OS, you need additional software for sound or video but, in any case, on Kde, Konqueror gets into the act again, then crashes.

I'd like a file browser that is just a file browser, not an intrusive task manager.

For seekers only

And another thing - losing non-kde file associations

This gets my goat as well. File-Roller, in my experience, is a much better tool for opening and extracting archives than Ark.

Almost every time I want to use File-Roller, I have to re-associate it with the archive type. This seems reminiscent of M$, deliberately sabotaging efforts to use applications from other sources.

For seekers only

re: file associations

I've seen this happen with me too, but usually only after upgrading. Usually, once I've set an association, it'll stay in place until something big changes.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Mir 0.8 Works On Less ABI Breakage, Touchspots, Responsiveness

While Ubuntu 14.10 on the desktop isn't using Mir by default, Mir 0.8.0 is being prepared for release by Canonical and it has a number of interesting changes. Read more

Open source history, present day, and licensing

Looking at open source softwares particularly, this is a fact that is probably useful to you if you are thinking about business models, many people don't care about it anymore. We talk about FOSS, Free and Open Source Software, but if we really are strict there's a difference between free software and open source software. On the left, I have free software which most typically is GPL software. Software where the license insures freedom. It gives freedoms to you as a user, but it also requires that the freedoms are maintained. On the right-hand side, you have open source software which is open for all, but it also allows you to close it. So here we come back to the famous clause of the GPL license, the reciprocity requirement which says, "If I am open, you need to be open." So software that comes under the GPL license carries with it something that other people call a virus. I call it a blessing because I think it's great if all software becomes open. Read more

Mozilla Wants to Save the Open Web, but is it Too Late?

Again, I think this is absolutely correct. But what it fails to recognise is that one of the key ways of making the Web medium "less free and open" is the use of legally-protected DRM. DRM is the very antithesis of openness and of sharing. And yet, sadly, as I reported back in May, Mozilla has decided to back adding DRM to the Web, starting first with video (but it won't end there...) This means Mozilla's Firefox is itself is a vector of attack against openness and sharing, and undermines its own lofty goals in the Open Web Fellows programme. Read more

Open source is starting to make a dent in proprietary software fortunes

Open source has promised to unseat proprietary competitors for decades, but the cloud may make the threat real. Read more