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Old-Fashioned Methods Still Apply When You Exercise Copying Rights

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Misc

Today's young whippersnappers don't seem to know that they are losing some core fair-use rights to owning stuff they pay for in their lust for Apple iPods and Microsoft Zunes and Sony Blu-ray movie players and Motorola Krzr cell phones that play streaming music.

All too soon these whippersnappers will realize that the only way they are going to be able to use the tunes and movies they have purchased in digital form is to keep buying iPods and Blu-ray DVD players and music-capable cell phones.

The rights to even limited ownership of copyrighted stuff fought for by my generation right up to and through the Supreme Court of the United States are trickling away because of today's global paranoia over consumers stealing copyrighted books, movies and music.

Open source offers help

People learn that it still is possible to use old-fashioned recording techniques to make analog copies of their digitally encrypted music and then burn the resulting files onto CDs and DVDs as their own MP3s.

Often the trick is software that instead of trying to copy encrypted songs simply records the audio coming out of a computer's sound card and the video coming out of the computer's display hardware.

For example, a simple and free program called Audacity works in the background to record music into MP3-type open-source files as it moves from the computer to the speakers.

Full Story.

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