Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Star Wars bootleggers face retribution

Filed under
Movies
Legal

Pirates peddling bootlegged copies of the just-released Star Wars: Episode III: Revenge of the Sith will be tracked down and caught, Hollywood's chief lobbyist warned.

The stern words from Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) president Dan Glickman came as the final instalment of the 28-year-old Star Wars franchise opened on screens in countries across the world.

Even as cinemas played the film for the legions of fans who have been anxiously awaiting its release, some file-swapping Web sites claimed to already have copies of the film.

"Fans have been lined up for days to see Revenge of the Sith," Glickman said.

"To preserve the quality of movies for fans like these and so many others, we must stop these Internet thieves from illegally trading valuable copyrighted materials on-line.
"My message to illegal file-swappers everywhere is plain and simple: You are stealing, it is wrong and you are not anonymous," said Glickman.

Pirating movies, such as George Lucas's final Star Wars offering, hits the cinema industry hard, costing jobs and thwarting innovation and creativity, he said.
Glickman said that an average movie cost US$98 million (AU$128.91 million) to make and market and that fewer than one in 10 films managed to recoup their investment from ticket sales, while six in 10 never manage to cover their costs.

"If piracy and those who profit from it are allowed to flourish, they will erode an engine of economic growth and job creation; undermine legitimate businesses that strive to unite technology and content in innovative and legal ways and limit quality and consumer choice," Glickman said.

© 2005 AFP

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • GitHub open sources OctoDNS, new tool for managing DNS records
    The frailty of the DNS system became all too evident last year, when DNS host Dyn was hit by a major Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack that brought down large swaths of the internet. With the threat of DDoS attacks only expected to grow, experts urge organizations to build redundancy into their DNS services.
  • 10 Pioneers taking open source to the next level
    Open source changed the software game, introduced in the mid-1980’s but really making an impact in the late 1990’s and introducing a free, collaborative approach to software development.
  • The Future of Big Data: Distilling Less Knowledge Per Bit
    Until recently, the word data didn’t require a modifier. But we passed a watershed moment when we started referring to big data. Apparently, that wasn’t a sufficient description for some chunks of data, because people grasped for bolder terms, such as humongous data. Sadly, now, it appears that we have run out of appropriate adjectives. And yet data keeps getting bigger and bigger.
  • Ignorance of open source law is no defense [Ed: uses fear of security and licensing issues to sell its services. Proprietary software is even worse in that regard.]
    While Open Source Software (OSS) has been around for decades, commercial software companies have had their traditional software design process flipped upside down in the last 10 years. When classic commercial software packages were first created years ago, there was very little third-party compliance that was required.
  • Open source is the future of teaching
    The work of teaching in developing countries is often hindered by an absence of basic resources, a lack of infrastructure, as well as underfunding, corruption and sociopolitical instability. Given these realities, how can we develop teachers in a way that promotes quality education for all? Open education resources (OERs) are freely accessible, openly licensed materials that are available online for anyone to use in teaching and learning. They have the potential to build capacity by providing educators with direct access, at low or no cost, to ways in which they can develop their competence.

Solus Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.24 LTS, New Repo Sync Tool Coming Soon

It's been more than a week since Solus Project launched the new Solus ISO snapshot, along with the first release of the Solus GNOME Edition, and Joshua Strobl is back with another installation of the This Week In Solus (TWiS) newsletter. This Week In Solus Install 43 delivers both good and bad news to Solus users. We'll start with the good news, as the distribution is now powered by the Linux 4.9.24 LTS kernel, and the ypkg build tool was updated to version 21, a maintenance release that adds a few improvements. The solbuild build system has been updated as well, and it's now compatible with the latest libgit2 library. Read more

Red Hat Financial News

GStreamer 1.12.0 release candidate 2 (1.11.91)