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Mandriva One Not the Linux Dinosaur of Old

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I recently shook the dust off my old Compaq 1800-XL notebook computer to see how easy it would be to install a modern-day Linux operating system. With so many distributions available, I began a Google search for something lightweight and small that could be downloaded quickly and was contained on a single disk. My search led me to several Linux distributions, and I chose Mandriva One, which came as an ISO CD image for download.

After I downloaded and burned Mandriva One to a CD, I simply inserted the CD into my laptop, set the machine's BIOS to boot from a CD and restarted the machine. The beauty of some of today's Linux distros is that they come as ready-to-use disk images, which you can use directly from a CD, enabling you to install them to your hard drive at a later point in time -- or not.

Once the operating system booted, I was pleasantly surprised to see that everything was working. It's always good when your hardware is detected and working properly, something I found lacking in early incarnations of Linux. I liked the K Desktop Environment (KDE) in my early Linux installs, and this version did not disappoint on that front.

Friendly Enough for a 7-Year-Old

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