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OSS Leftovers

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  • Sprint NFV/SDN Research Leads to Open Source Project for Network Efficiency

    Mobile carrier Sprint has culminated four years of research into Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) and software-defined networking (SDN) with a new open source offering designed to make core networks more efficient through new-age virtualization techniques.

  • TensorFlow: Providing Support to a Successful Open-Source Project

    Building a community around an open-source project requires a number of practices regarding support, pull requests handling, licensing, and more, writes Pete Warden, TensorFlow Mobile lead at Google.

    A great challenge in the early life of a new project, explains Warden, is providing support to those who are using it. At first, the only available experts are the developers themselves, who have to find a way to integrate their day-to-day tasks with other support duties. This is not entirely straightforward, since it may take developers outside of their comfort zone and potentially distract them from their main tasks. The TensorFlow team dealt with this challenge by establishing a rotation among all engineers, so each engineer took responsibility for a particular area for one full week approximately once every couple of months.

  • AT&T's Donovan defends operator's embrace of open source software

    “It really doesn’t have a downside,” Donovan said of the proliferation of open source software in the telecom industry. He explained that operators can either choose to simply obtain open source solutions for free through open source groups, or they can opt to participate in open source communities by designing and building solutions.

  • AT&T’s Donovan: Open Source is Necessary to Win the War

    AT&T’s transformation from traditional telco to an open source champion was largely driven by John Donovan, the company’s chief strategy officer and group president. Donovan took the stage at Light Reading’s Big Communications Event today to tell those questioning the necessity of open source projects that they are “dead wrong.”

    Donovan said that competition from over-the-top players, cable companies, and others are making it critical for AT&T to move to open source. “Our open source projects have doubled in the past year,” Donovan said, adding that sitting around and operating in a traditional telecom mode is no longer effective.

  • 3D Hardware Acceleration in Haiku

    The Mesa renderer in Haiku presently ventures into software rendering. Haiku uses software for rendering frame buffers and then writes them to the graphics hardware. The goal of my project is to port Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) Driver for i915, from the Linux kernel to Haiku with the help of DragonflyBSD's Linux Compatibility layer, so that those drivers can be later extended to add OpenGL support (Mesa3D) for hardware accelerated 3D rendering.

More in Tux Machines

EXT4 fscrypt vs. eCryptfs vs. LUKS dm-crypt Benchmarks

Given the recent advancements of the EXT4 file-system with its native file-system encryption support provided by the fscrypt framework, here are benchmarks comparing the performance of an EXT4 file-system with no encryption, fscrypt-based encryption, eCryptfs-based encryption, and a LUKS dm-crypt encrypted volume. Read more

Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" Has Reached End of Security Support, Upgrade Now

Released more than three years ago, on April 25, 2015, Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" is currently considered the "oldstable" Debian branch since the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series precisely a year ago, on June 17, 2017. As such, Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" has now reached end of life and will no longer receive regular security support beginning June 17, 2018. Security support for Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" will be handed over to the Debian LTS team now that LTS (Long Term Support) support has ended for Debian GNU/Linux 7 "Wheezy" on May 31, 2018. Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" will start receiving additional support from the Debian LTS project starting today, but only for a limited number of packages and architectures like i386, amd64, armel, and armhf. Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

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