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Will Ubuntu 6.10 Beta finally make me think about switching?

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Ubuntu

I have for many years considered myself a "Professional Linux Installer". I bet there are some readers that know what I am talking about. In the past, I would try many distros out but never really liking any of them. I tried the SUSE's and Mandrake's of long ago but I finally settled on Xandros.

Xandros wasnt the most up-to-date distro but heah, "It Just Works"

But now, I think I may have found another.... Ubuntu may be calling me to switch. So I have documented my experience with the new Ubuntu 6.10 Beta. It's like all the other screenshot reviews I have done. Only now this distro did not fail me once during it's initial install. Plus, it's lightning fast GNOME desktop really impressed me.

Full Story.

Ubuntu marketing

The more I see these kinds of articles the more I feel the Ubuntu marketing machine in full force.

That's true, I know a few

That's true, I know a few people whose first Linux experience has been with Ubuntu. I have tried Ubuntu 6.10 beta but it is really slow.
The fastest ever distribution when it comes to performance is Mandriva 2007. I tried it and it is really fast but their kernel is a bit buggy.
I finally settled on Archlinux. I will only go back to Ubuntu once they fix the speed issues.

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