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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • A Step Forward for Security [iophk: "end point compromise negates many theoretical advantages"]

    While we are all mesmerized by the presidential crises, a small, but quite significant change occurred in Congress: the Senate Sergeant at Arms approved the use of Signal by Senate staff. Signal, a product of Open Whisper Systems, provides end-to-end encryption for Apple and Android phones.

  • Why Europe’s dependency on Microsoft is a huge security risk

    On May 12, hackers hit more than a hundred countries, exploiting a stolen N.S.A. tool that targeted vulnerabilities of Microsoft software. The attacks infected only machines running on Windows operative system. Among the victims are public administrative bodies such as NHS hospitals in the UK. Investigate Europe spent months to investigate the dire dependency of European countries on Microsoft – and the security risks this entails

  • NSA told Microsoft about stolen exploits: officials

    Current and former NSA officials say the agency informed Microsoft about the theft of the exploit named EternalBlue after learning of it, making it possible for the Redmond software giant to issue a patch for it in March. The exploit was used in the WannaCry ransomware attacks over last weekend.

  • Shadow Brokers claims Microsoft hand-in-glove with NSA

    The group that released NSA exploits for Windows, which were used in massive ransomware attacks last weekend, has accused Microsoft of being hand-in-glove with The Equation Group, a group that is believed to be a front for the NSA.

  • NSA officials worried about the day its potent hacking tool would get loose. Then it did.

    But for more than five years, the NSA kept using it — through a time period that has seen several serious security breaches — and now the officials' worst fears have been realized. The malicious code at the heart of the WannaCry virus that hit computer systems globally late last week was apparently stolen from the NSA, repackaged by cybercriminals and unleashed on the world for a cyberattack that now ranks as among the most disruptive in history.

  • Shadow Brokers threaten to unleash more hacking tools

    The so-called Shadow Brokers, who claimed responsibility for releasing NSA tools that were used to spread the WannaCry ransomware through the NHS and across the world, said they have a new suite of tools and vulnerabilities in newer software. The possible targets include Microsoft's Windows 10, which was unaffected by the initial attack and is on at least 500m devices around the world.

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Google Chrome 60 Released

DRM-Carrying Flash's Death in the News

  • Google: HTML is Faster, Safer, and More Power Efficient Than Adobe's Flash
    After Adobe's big announcement this morning that they plan to end support for Flash in late 2020, Google Chrome's Anthony Laforge published a blog article asking Flash developers to start transitioning to HTML. For a long time, Google shipped its Chrome web browser built-in with Flash support, but it now looks like Chrome will slowly start blocking Flash content, require explicit permission from users, until upstream support is terminated three years from now, at the end of 2020. Google, like anyone else on this planet, believe HTML is faster, safer, and more power efficient than Flash, without a doubt.
  • Adobe Flash will die by 2020, Adobe and browser makers say
     

    For many, though, Flash was simply seen at least as a nuisance, and at worst a serious security risk.   

     

    Flash-based exploits have circulated for years, in a game of cat-and-mouse between hackers and Adobe itself. Apple's Steve Jobs famously banned Flash from the iPhone, claiming that Flash hurt battery life and also was a security risk. [...]

  • Adobe Flash is dead (well, nearly)
     

    Tech firms have long been hammering nail's into its coffin, too, and back in 2010, Steve Jobs famously penned a letter that called for the demise of Adobe Flash in favour of a shift to open web standards.

  • The end of Flash

FreeBSD 11.1 Released

  • FreeBSD 11.1 Operating System Debuts to Support 2nd Generation Microsoft Hyper-V
    The FreeBSD Project announced today the release and immediate availability of the first incremental update to the FreeBSD 11 operating system series, FreeBSD 11.1. It's been more than nine months since FreeBSD 11 was released as the latest and most advanced version of the widely-used and most popular BSD operating system on the market, and now, FreeBSD 11.1 is here with a bunch of new features across multiple components, as well as all the latest security and bug fixes.
  • FreeBSD 11.1 Debuts With LLVM/Clang 4, ZFS Improvements
    FreeBSD 11.1 is now available as the first point release to FreeBSD 11.
  • FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE Announcement
    The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE. This is the second release of the stable/11 branch.