Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The hundred dollar laptop and the Third World

Filed under
Hardware

One of the more interesting stories buzzing around the Internet is the imminent release of the $100 laptop, a project of Nicholas Negroponte of the MIT Media Lab. The laptop isn't meant to be commercially sold, rather it is part of a humanitarian endeavor to put laptops in the hands of poor children in third world countries.

It's a wonderful idea, and orchids to Nick for thinking it up. Perhaps my cynical side gets the best of me, but when the folks in the Ivory Tower and government agencies try to do something for the poor folks, they usually don't quite get it quite right. Like providing hundreds of mobile homes to Katrina victims, and then not letting anybody live in them because they don't meet code, for example. I've visited, and lived in some of those third world countries that are on the list to get the laptops, and I know they will do some good. But of course, probably not as much good as one might think. Walking through the busy border market in Poipet, Cambodia, I saw evidence of plenty of benevolence from the West, in terms of huge bags and crates of goods donated by various non-profits. Unfortunately, two things struck me about those donations.

First, a great many of the goods wound up for sale in the border market stalls. Second, a lot of the goods were completely useless to poor Cambodians.

Full Story.

RE: OLPC is the beginning of communism ?

Nope. It is not communism, because those countries will PAY for those laptops. And hardware vendors will get even richer, on the expenses of the poor countries.

This is monopoly, imperialism and corporate welfare all-in-one.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

Development News

  • GCC 7 Moves Onto Only Regression/Doc Fixes, But Will Accept RISC-V & HSA's BRIG
    The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) is entering its "stage four" development for GCC 7 with the stable GCC 7.1 release expected in March or April. Richard Biener announced today that GCC 7 is under stage four, meaning only regression and documentation fixes will be permitted until the GCC 7.1.0 stable release happens (yep, as per their peculiar versioning system, GCC 7.1 is the first stable release in the GCC 7 series).
  • 5 ways to expand your project's contributor base
    So many free and open source software projects were started to solve a problem, and people began to contribute to them because they too wanted a fix to what they encountered. End users of the project find it useful for their needs, and the project grows. And that shared purpose and focus attracts people to a project's community.
  • Weblate 2.10.1
    This is first security bugfix release for Weblate. This has to come at some point, fortunately the issue is not really severe. But Weblate got it's first CVE ID today, so it's time to address it in a bugfix release.

Intel Kabylake: Windows 10 vs. Linux OpenGL Performance

For those curious about the current Kabylake graphics performance between Windows 10 and Linux, here are some OpenGL benchmark results under each operating system. Windows 10 Pro x64 was tested and the Linux distributions for comparison were Ubuntu 16.10, Clear Linux, Antergos, Fedora 25 Xfce, and openSUSE Tumbleweed. Read more

Google's open-source Tilt Brush: Now you can create 3D movies in VR