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Multimedia: Recording Audio, VLC Media Player 2.2.5, OpenShot 2.3.2

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Software
  • A simple command-line tool for recording audio

    Machine learning and natural language processing are transforming our relationship with our devices by giving them a human voice. People with visual impairments have especially benefited from these technologies, but those who speak languages like my native Odia have largely been left behind by most voicebanks.

    When T. Shrinivasan, a Tamil-language Wikipedian, started the Voice-recorder-for-tawictionary, he probably didn't realize how useful his open source tool can be for users like me. I was in search of a simple tool that could allow me to record large chunks of words in a short time so that those recordings can be used on Odia Wiktionary, a sister project of Wikipedia and a free dictionary in Odia language that has translations of Odia and other language words.

  • VLC Media Player 2.2.5 Improves Video Scaling in VDPAU, MP3 Playback, and More

    VLC 2.2.5 arrived recently with a great number of improvements over the previous stable update of the open-source, free and cross-platform video player application for GNU/Linux, macOS and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

    In fact, it's been almost a year since VLC 2.2.4 was announced back in early June 2016, and users can now finally update their beloved media player to a newer version that has quite a number of improvements. For example, VLC 2.2.5 improves the MP3 playback quality when the libmad library is used, as well as VDPAU video scalling and the playback of palettized codecs.

  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Open-Source Video Editor Is Out, Addresses a Few Important Issues

    OpenShot developer Jonathan Thomas today announced the release and immediate availability of the first public maintenance update to the OpenShot 2.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform video editor.

    OpenShot 2.3 arrived at the end of March 2017 as "one of the biggest updates ever" of the popular and free video editor software that's used with success by many videographers and vloggers on the Open Source community, but also by any home user who wants to edit his/her vacation movies.

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