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Linux and FOSS Events: OSCON and More

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  • 11 wisdoms from half a life in open source

    Brad Fitzpatrick, a software engineer at Google working on the Go programming language, is a life-long nerd.

    His father worked at Intel, so he grew up steeped in technology. He started writing software in middle school, and he has been building and working with open source software for 19 years—over half of his life. Fitzpatrick's keynote at OSCON this year was based on bits of wisdom from half a life in open source.

  • Starting an Open Source Project: A Free Webinar Highlights Best Practices

    Have you launched an open source project or are you considering doing so? Making a success of your project can involve everything from evaluating licenses to community outreach. The good news is that there are many free resources that can help you advance and protect your project.

    A recent webinar called “Best Practices for Starting an Open Source Project” focused on this topic. Hosted by Capital One, the online event featured Mike Dolan, VP of Strategic Programs at The Linux Foundation, as well as Scott Nicholas, who is Senior Director in the same department and assists in the execution of The Linux Foundation’s annual Legal Summit and other legal programs.

  • OpenStack Summit – Edward Snowden, open source and the power of ‘The Collective’

    Edward Snowden, former US NSA employee and self-styled information liberator, remains a highly contentious figure on the US political scene.

    It was then perhaps curiously appropriate, if inadvertent, timing that he should make a guest telecast appearance from Russia to the OpenStack Summit in Boston on the same day that President Donald Trump was sacking FBI Director James Comey as the row over alleged connections to the Kremlin and the Trump campaign rumbles on.

  • GSoC: First week of community bonding

    The first week of community bonding is nearly over and already it’s quite an experience for me. Me and Alameyo were very nicely welcomed by members of the igniterealtime project which really took care of making us able to jump right into the project.

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