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Linux and FOSS Events: OSCON and More

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  • 11 wisdoms from half a life in open source

    Brad Fitzpatrick, a software engineer at Google working on the Go programming language, is a life-long nerd.

    His father worked at Intel, so he grew up steeped in technology. He started writing software in middle school, and he has been building and working with open source software for 19 years—over half of his life. Fitzpatrick's keynote at OSCON this year was based on bits of wisdom from half a life in open source.

  • Starting an Open Source Project: A Free Webinar Highlights Best Practices

    Have you launched an open source project or are you considering doing so? Making a success of your project can involve everything from evaluating licenses to community outreach. The good news is that there are many free resources that can help you advance and protect your project.

    A recent webinar called “Best Practices for Starting an Open Source Project” focused on this topic. Hosted by Capital One, the online event featured Mike Dolan, VP of Strategic Programs at The Linux Foundation, as well as Scott Nicholas, who is Senior Director in the same department and assists in the execution of The Linux Foundation’s annual Legal Summit and other legal programs.

  • OpenStack Summit – Edward Snowden, open source and the power of ‘The Collective’

    Edward Snowden, former US NSA employee and self-styled information liberator, remains a highly contentious figure on the US political scene.

    It was then perhaps curiously appropriate, if inadvertent, timing that he should make a guest telecast appearance from Russia to the OpenStack Summit in Boston on the same day that President Donald Trump was sacking FBI Director James Comey as the row over alleged connections to the Kremlin and the Trump campaign rumbles on.

  • GSoC: First week of community bonding

    The first week of community bonding is nearly over and already it’s quite an experience for me. Me and Alameyo were very nicely welcomed by members of the igniterealtime project which really took care of making us able to jump right into the project.

More in Tux Machines Open-Source Platform Speeds Development, Requirements Process

IT development in the federal government has earned its reputation for being a painfully slow process but, the government’s cloud application platform, is helping to change that by standardizing the application lifecycle and helping to document it every step of the way. The need to document the entire stack of an IT solution in the federal government can run up to 1,000 pages, and that process requires in depth knowledge of thousands of pages of regulations, laws and risk management policies. Typically, federal agencies have compliance experts who must review this documentation and grant approval or request changes. This can take six to 14 months to get authority to operate (ATO), and then you still need to deploy the application. Read more Also: Hortonworks’ Shaun Bierweiler: Open Source Software to Help Advance Federal IT Modernization

Today in Techrights

Developer survey shows Linux as more popular than Windows

Every year since 2010, Stack Overflow conducts a developer survey where they ask the developer community about everything from their favorite technologies to their job preferences. The results of the eighth annual survey, held in January 2018, are out and not surprisingly, this year marks the largest number of respondents ever. Over 100,000 developers took the 30-minute survey revealing how they learn new technologies, which tools they use to get their work done, and what they look for while hunting some job. Read more

Ubuntu Preps to Remove Qt 4 Support from the Archives, Target Ubuntu 19.04

With Qt 5 being largely adopted by Qt application developers and other major projects, such as the KDE Plasma desktop environment, the Qt 4 technologies are becoming obsolete, so more and more GNU/Linux distributions plan its complete removal from the software repositories. Debian Project's Qt/KDE teams are already preparing to remove Qt 4 support from the repositories of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series mainly because it's getting harder and harder to maintain it now that it is no longer supported upstream, and may cause lots of problems system-wide. Read more