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Development News: Haskell, Node.js, C++, and Golang

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Development
  • Three things I didn't know about Haskell

    I've been trying to refresh my Haskell skills and Paul Callaghan recommended I read the paper "A History of Haskell: Being Lazy With Class", which I found (surprisingly?) fascinating.

  • Keeping the Node.js core small

    Features are wonderful. When Node.js adds a new API, we can instantly do more with it.

    Wouldn’t a larger standard library be more useful for developers? Who could possibly object to Node.js getting better? And who, even more strangely, would actually remove APIs, making Node.js objectively worse?

  • NVIDIA Details CUDA 9 Features, Allows C++14 In Device Code

    NVIDIA at their annual GPU Technology Conference (GTC'17) have provided more public details about the forthcoming CUDA 9 compute update.

  • A Big Golang Update Lands In GCC 8.0

    Now that GCC 7 was released as stable last week, the GCC trunk/master code-base is back open for merging more feature work with the beginning of the GCC 8 development cycle.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

6-Way Enterprise Focused Linux Distribution Comparison With An Intel Core i9, Dual Xeon Gold Systems

Here's our latest Linux distribution comparison with this time looking at the out-of-the-box performance of six Linux distributions while running a range of enterprise/workstation-focused benchmarks while using two systems. One system is a high-end Core i9 7980XE desktop system and the other a Tyan 1U Xeon Scalable server with dual Xeon Gold 6138 processors. Read more

Security: FOSS Versus Windows

Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75

The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC. Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU. The hexa-core SoC has appeared on T-Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399 SBC and RK3399 Coreboard computer-on-module, as well as Videostrong’s VS-RD-RK3399 SBC and Theobroma’s RK3399-Q7 Qseven module. Now we have a new contender: Shenzhen based Vamrs, which built the limited edition Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC as the official RK3399 dev board for Rockchip, is now re-launching the board, which features a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector, with “many in stock” for a discounted price of $75. Read more