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Leftovers: Devices, KDE, ArchBang, Grml and More

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  • Raspberry Pi Zero W fixes networking omission

    I don't recommend trying to use the Raspberry Pi Zero W as a GUI desktop alternative. It works, but it is slow. I mean, you can watch YouTube videos on it, but for an extra $25, you could get a Raspberry Pi 3 that has double the RAM and more horsepower to give you a better and more responsive experience than the Raspberry Pi Zero W.

  • Take a sneak peek at Google's Android replacement, Fuchsia

    An enthusiast has compiled Google's infant Fuchsia OS and put the toddler through its paces.

    The open-source OS is an open secret – anyone can download the platform from Github, and one enthusiast at Hotfix, a repair shop in Texas, has done just that.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.5, Krita 3.1.3 and digiKam 5.5 Coming Soon to Kubuntu 17.04 Users

    KDE's José Manuel Santamaría Lema is informing the Kubuntu Linux community today about the upcoming availability of a multitude of updates for various KDE technologies in the Kubuntu Backports PPA.

    It's a known fact that Kubuntu developers are always working hard to bring you all the latest goodies as soon as they are released upstream, and it looks like Kubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) users will be treated with the KDE Plasma 5.9.5 desktop environment, which is the last in the series as KDE Plasma 5.10 is coming at the end of May.

  • ArchBang OpenRC Rc iso
  • Grml 2017.05 "Freedatensuppe" Distro Enters Development Based on Debian Stretch

    The Debian-based Grml GNU/Linux distribution designed for system administrators is once again in development after taking a long break of approximately two and a half years.

    Dubbed "Freedatensuppe," the next major release of the operating system is versioned Grml 2017.05, and a first Release Candidate (RC) build is now available for public testing. Development of Grml 2017.05 is currently based on the Debian Testing branch, which will soon become Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch."

  • Much ado about communication

    One of the first challenges an open source project faces is how to communicate among contributors. There are a plethora of options: forums, chat channels, issues, mailing lists, pull requests, and more. How do we choose which is the right medium to use and how do we do it right?

    Sadly and all too often, projects shy away from making a disciplined decision and instead opt for "all of the above." This results in a fragmented community: Some people sit in Slack/Mattermost/IRC, some use the forum, some use mailing lists, some live in issues, and few read all of them.

  • What Internet-Connected War Might Look Like

    A technician hurriedly slings his backpack over his shoulders, straps on his M9 pistol, and bolts out of the transport with his squad of commandos in a hail of gunfire. As soon as his team reaches the compound, he whips out a laptop and starts deploying a rootkit to the target server, bullets whizzing overhead all the while.

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Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and elementary OS All Patched Against WPA2 KRACK Bug

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Pixel 2 and 2 XL review—The best Android phone you can buy

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