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OpenStack Summit

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  • Why Edward Snowden loves open source

    Infamous government hacker Edward Snowden believes open source is a fundamentally better way to use technology compared to proprietary technology that he believes disempowers users.

    Snowden was interviewed at the open source cloud computing project OpenStack Summit in Boston via video from a non-descript location and spoke about his personal use of open source technology. In 2013 Snowden, then a government contractor, leaked classified information about government surveillance programs run by the National Security Agency, which brought him worldwide fame.

  • Snowden Advocates the Need for Open Source and OpenStack

    Using public cloud and proprietary software represents a "silent vulnerability" to millions of users around the world, according to National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

    Snowden appeared remotely via a video link at the OpenStack Summit here May 9 in a question-and-answer keynote with OpenStack Foundation Chief Operating Officer Mark Collier. Snowden said the average user is unaware of how the internet works.

    "For most people, the internet is magic," he said.

    According to Snowden, it's not good enough to let people mindlessly build internet and cloud services, which is where OpenStack plays an important role. He noted that while there are for-profit alternatives in the cloud space like Amazon that do a decent job, they are fundamentally disempowering.

  • OpenStack Summit Highlights Cloud Use Cases

    OpenStack started off as a cloud technology project and has evolved steadily over the last few years. In a marathon two and a half hour set of keynotes on the first day of the OpenStack Summit here, the OpenStack Foundation and the vendors and companies that use it talked about how they are using the cloud.

  • How the U.S. Army Is Using OpenStack to Train Cyber-Warriors

    The open-source OpenStack cloud platform is now being used to help train the next generation of cyber-warriors. At the OpenStack Summit here May 8, officers from the U.S. Army Cyber School explained how they are using OpenStack to train soldiers to fight in the cyber-domain.

    Major Julianna Rodriguez, director, and Chris Apsey, deputy director of the Cyber Technical College at the U.S. Army Cyber School, detailed their activities in a keynote as well as a late-day deep-dive technical session titled "Saving Millions and Achieving Education Freedom Through OpenStack. "

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  • ​Snowden praises open source for protecting privacy

    Edward Snowden, the fugitive whistleblower and former NSA contractor who revealed the organization's global hacking powers in 2013, may seem like an unlikely guest at OpenStack Summit in Boston, but his message was on target. Snowden spoke about how the public cloud and proprietary software disempower people and pry open their privacy.

  • OpenStack Aims to Enable a Composable and Cloud Native World

    OpenStack has long billed itself as an integration engine enabling organizations to plug into different technologies. At the OpenStack Summit here, Mark Collier, Executive Director of the OpenStack Foundation, explained and demonstrated in a keynote address why it's important to embrace composable and cloud native infrastructure.

  • Why OpenStack is living on the edge

    In the early days of OpenStack, much of the media coverage seemed fixated on whether or not the project would be able to "win" the cloud computing marketplace, and which company would "win" OpenStack, as if the future of technology is a zero-sum game. The keynotes at this week's OpenStack Summit highlight just how narrow view this is.

    What has emerged isn't a need for a one-size-fits-all generic cloud, but instead, many competing needs across nearly every industry you can think of, for which cloud helps provide part of the answer.

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