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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • A vigilante hacker may have built a computer worm to protect smart devices

    The worm, known as Hajime, has infected tens of thousands of easy-to-hack products such as DVRs, internet cameras, and routers. However, the program so far hasn’t done anything malicious.

    Instead, the worm has been preventing a notorious malware known as Mirai from infecting the same devices. It’s also been carrying a message written from its developer.

  • vuln disclosure and risk equilibrium
  • How to Look at Mission-Critical Safety in the Internet of Cars

    The autonomous car will redefine how we travel, ship inventory, and design infrastructure. As physical objects become more deeply integrated into the Internet of Things, the connected car will soon become an essential component of the IoT ecosystem.

    An important element as we look towards actually implementing the autonomous car is understanding how mission-critical safety software and the Internet of Cars will operate within the car ecosystem. This is a blog that tries to explain what is happening currently; the importance of creating a security-first approach with open source software; and how we at EPAM are approach and solving some of the common problems.

  • Google tells users with borked WiFi to stop using Windows 10
  • Tanium exposed hospital’s IT while using its network in sales demos

    Starting in 2012, Tanium apparently had a secret weapon to help it compete with the wave of newcomers, which the company's executives used in sales demonstrations: a live customer network they could tap into for product demonstrations. There was just one problem: the customer didn't know that Tanium was using its network. And since the customer was a hospital, the Tanium demos—which numbered in the hundreds between 2012 and 2015, according to a Wall Street Journal report—exposed live, sensitive information about the hospital's IT systems. Until recently, some of that data was shown in publicly posted videos.

  • Tanium CEO Apologizes for Being 'Hard-Edged' After Executive Exodus

    Cybersecurity startup used hospital's computer network for sales pitches without permission

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Android Leftovers

PC-MOS/386 is the latest obsolete operating system to open source on Github

PC-MOS/386 was first announced by The Software Link in 1986 and was released in early 1987. It was capable of working on any x86 computer (though the Intel 80386 was its target market). However, some later chips became incompatible because they didn't have the necessary memory management unit. It had a dedicated following but also contained a couple of design flaws that made it slow and/or expensive to run. Add to that the fact it had a Y2K bug that manifested on 31 July 2012, after which any files created wouldn't work, and it's not surprising that it didn't become the gold standard. The last copyright date listed is 1992, although some users have claimed to be using it far longer. Read more