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Docker News From DockerCon and Moby

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  • Docker LinuxKit: Secure Linux containers for Windows, macOS, and clouds

    At Dockercon in Austin, Texas, Docker CEO Solomon Hydes said, Docker "is a bunch of projects not a monolith." One of the newest of these projects is LinuxKit. This is a toolkit for building secure, portable, and lean operating systems for containers.

  • As container adoption grows, Linux community champions open source

    While much of the recent rise in enthusiasm for containers in applications has users closely associating that functionality with Docker Inc., members of the Linux community have been eager to point out how long their systems have been using containers in applications and to encourage users to look into further Linux utility for their needs.

    “Containers aren’t a Docker thing; containers are a Linux thing. … It’s been a core Linux feature for over a decade now,” said Brian Gracely (pictured), director of product strategy at Red Hat Inc.

  • Introducing Moby Project: a new open-source project to advance the software containerization movement

    Since Docker democratized software containers four years ago, a whole ecosystem grew around containerization and in this compressed time period it has gone through two distinct phases of growth. In each of these two phases, the model for producing container systems evolved to adapt to the size and needs of the user community as well as the project and the growing contributor ecosystem.

  • Docker’s new Moby open-source project is the ‘Lego Club of container systems’

    Docker Inc. is launching a new open-source initiative, dubbed the Moby Project, which the San Francisco-based company describes as a new effort to move software container technology further into mainstream use by developers and businesses.

    Moby was announced this morning at the annual DockerCon convention in Austin, Texas. The project includes a library of backend components, a framework for assembling those components into a container platform, and a reference assembly called Moby Origin, explains Docker founder and CTO Solomon Hykes in a post announcing the new project.

  • Docker debuts containerized kit for building Linux distros

    Since its beginning, Docker has been created by synthesizing elements in Linux and repackaging them in useful ways. Docker’s next trick is the reverse: using container elements to synthesize distributions of Linux.

    Today Docker unveiled LinuxKit and the Moby Project, a pair of projects that are intended to allow operating system vendors, do-it-yourselfers, and cutting-edge software creators to create container-native OSes and container-based systems.

  • DockerCon: Docker announces two new collaborative open-source container projects

    Docker wants containers to be the building blocks of interchangeable platforms. The company announced two new open-source projects, the LinuxKit and the Moby Project, at day two of its DockerCon conference in Austin, Texas.

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today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE

OSS Leftovers