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Linux, Mac and/or WIndows? And where?

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Linux system administrators should consider getting their MCSE. What? That’s correct. You might also consider buying a Mac Mini desktop and practice with it at home. I’m serious, so take this recommendation to heart.

In the past, I have written about the crazy job market for Linux system administrators and help desk professionals. Hiring managers have problems with hiring pure Linux professionals. It might fall into the area of myth, but hiring managers believe those myhts. They believe Linux guys who say they don’t mind working with Windows will then turn around and leave within a short time frame. Secondly, Linux technologists with previous experience with Microsoft will find hiring managers leery of their Windows skills. Those hiring managers probably have a point.

Wanna eat?

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re: Linux, Mac, and/or Windows

Dabbler in many usually means expert in none.

It's been my experience that FOCUS and EXPERTISE are where the big bucks are.

As to MCSE certificates, I don't know of anyone that places any real value in them (and if they do, why would you want to work with someone that utterly clueless?). They're a dime a dozen and most holders are completely baffled as to how enterprise systems are designed or managed.

re re: Linux, Mac, and/or Windows

vonskippy wrote:
Dabbler in many usually means expert in none.

It's been my experience that FOCUS and EXPERTISE are where the big bucks are.

As to MCSE certificates, I don't know of anyone that places any real value in them (and if they do, why would you want to work with someone that utterly clueless?). They're a dime a dozen and most holders are completely baffled as to how enterprise systems are designed or managed.

Yeah, the author wants people to be: "Jack of all trades, master of none".

I'm always very weary of those who toot about their MSCE certifications. (Personally, it means jack$hit to me, as I test people on material that isn't found in MSCE guides and such...Just to see if they know their stuff and how they handle a situation in the real world).

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