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Review : Mandriva 2007

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Mandriva you say? To be honest I haven’t used Mandriva since the days when they were known as Mandrake. They always had one of the more user friendly Linux operating systems around, but made some questionable decisions. They changed their release schedule to yearly and the software that came with Mandrake seemed out of date. Their Drake Conf tool was good for the new user to Linux, but was cumbersomb to use on a daily basis. They did also have that VERY synister looking duck as their mascot by version 10 or so. When I saw that duck with shining pupils, it was bye bye Mandrake.

Since that time I have become perfectly happy with Ubuntu and Fedora, but decided to give Mandriva another chance since their latest version sports some very nice software. Some of the more tantalizing offerings Mandriva 2007 has :

KDE 3.5.4
XORG 7.1
Kernel 2.17
OpenOffice 2.0.3
Gaim 2.0 b3
AIGLX and Xgl 3D-accelerated desktop

Full Story.

Mandriva 2007 Starts With: Esfa And... Errata

Esfa (Eric Augé) has some first impressions with 2007 (in French).

In short:
The installation was OK, but the update did not work (it's not clear if it's a temporary problem or a broken feature).
The desktop icons were not 32x32, but 48x48 pixels!
LinDVD was not correctly packaged — the license file was not in the proper location.

More Here.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

I'm a starter

I'm motivated to download a livecd.

It seems that Mandriva is to be congratulated. I'm glad because it compares well with other distros. In the past, it has been a pleasure to install and having a leaner installation source adds to the appeal.

For seekers only

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