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PCLinuxOS .93 xorg.conf problem quick fix

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PCLOS
HowTos

If you're like me, you change things constantly in your linux desktop. I'm always entering in and tweaking .conf files to see what I can do and where the limits of things might be. In my attempt yesterday to get my EXACT monitor supported in PCLinuxOS, I hosed my xorg.conf file which is where all the Xsession settings (or Xwindows session) are stored (like mouse, keyboard, monitor, and graphics driver settings). Since I hosed this up, my graphical user interface and window manager would not start. So I was dropped to login via the shell. This might be daunting for some new users in Linux so I figured I'd write up this little how-to that would get them back on their feet.

First, don't be intimidated by the shell. It's more powerful than a cmd line in windows and you'll have complete control of your computer from the confines of this awesome tool. Plus, you're about 15-20 seconds away from having your desktop back up and running by executing only a few commands.

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Also:

As a former Windows user, I know that it can be easy to feel overwhelmed by the volume of available distributions. Often, to help decipher the lingo and choose a capable distribution, those new to the community seek guidance from existing users. Sometimes, this can lead to a really positive result, as another Windows user joins the Linux community.

From my reading, it is clear that most Linux users experiment with a number of "flavours" until they settle on the one with the best "taste" for them.

As their moniker declares, PCLinuxOS is "radically simple." This was precisely the kind of distribution I needed.

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This content is very

This content is very informative and helpful; especially to new migrants. It's also got a little bit of persuasive power for hesitant potential migrants like myself. I probably won't be able to appreviate the configuration tips as of now, but I do appreciate having had a preview of what I could possibly be using someday. The live-cd is really good, so those who are having second-thougts would be able to try it out without actually having to install it. I also like their features for gaming. Kids can use the computer to play without you having to worry about them destroying files and configurations.

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