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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Web Browsers: Brave, Firefox,and Chromium Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2018 - 9:39pm
Story Audiocasts/Shows: Going Linux, Linux Thursday and More Roy Schestowitz 1 11/12/2018 - 9:28pm
Story IBM-Red Hat "Merger" Update Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2018 - 9:27pm
Story Linux Foundation: ONAP, the Joint Development Foundation and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2018 - 8:52pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2018 - 8:30pm
Story Adobe and GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2018 - 8:27pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 11/12/2018 - 7:52pm
Story An Initial Look At The Intel Iris Gallium3D Driver Performance Rianne Schestowitz 11/12/2018 - 7:45pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2018 - 7:38pm
Story Canonical makes Kubernetes moves Rianne Schestowitz 1 11/12/2018 - 7:03pm

Web Browsers: Brave, Firefox,and Chromium

Filed under
Web
  • HTC Exodus: Open Source Brave to be Blockchain phone’s default web browser

    HTC’s latest release HTC Exodus 1 is set to introduce the free and open source blockchain-backed Brave as its default browser.

    In a tweet, the CEO & Co-Founder of Brave and Basic Attention Token (BAT) Brendan Eich, shared the development. Brendan said, “We are very happy to have @Brave as default browser & to be working with HTC on their Exodus phone”.

  • Mozilla Firefox 64 Now Available for Download on Windows, Linux, and macOS

    Mozilla has just released Firefox 64 stable for users on Windows, Linux, and macOS, with the Android version likely to be updated in the coming hours.
    While checking for updates using the built-in update engine may not offer you Firefox version 64, you can download the browser using the links below, as Mozilla has just updated its servers with the new builds.

    Firefox 64 introduces a series of changes that were previously tested as part of the beta versions, including recommended extensions. This feature is supposed to help improve the experience with the browser by providing suggestions on services that are relevant to your activity.

  • Microsoft vs the web

    I have been saying for a few years now that Chrome is the new IE, and the Google is the new Microsoft (Microsoft being the new IBM). This statement have been somewhat tongue in cheek, but I have always been serious about it not being a joke: history is repeating. I could got at length on all the reasons why I believe this to be true, but I’ll just talk about one new development.

    Last week, Microsoft announced that they had decided to abandon EdgeHTML, their web browser engine, and move to be using Google’s Chromium as the heart of the web browser offering, Edge. [1] Whether it will be just Blink and V8 (Web rendering and JS engine respectively) or also parts of Chromium is something unclear.

  • What is Chromium and why is Microsoft using it for Edge?

    Chromium is very similar. You can install a standalone application for Windows, macOS and any flavor of Linux named Chromium that's a complete web browser complete with synchronization through Google's could services. But Chromium is also the name of the open-source code project used to make Chromium, as well as the Chrome web browser, Chrome OS, Amazon Silk, and the Android Chrome web-view component companies like Twitter can use to build a browser into an application.

  • How Microsoft Is About to Make Google Chrome Even Better

IBM-Red Hat "Merger" Update

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Red Hat sets date for stockholders to vote on IBM merger

    Open source solutions provider Red Hat has set a special meeting on 16 January for stockholders to consider and vote on IBM's proposed acquisition of the company.

    On 28 October, IBM and Red hat announced an agreement and plan of merger which would see IBM acquire Red Hat for $190.00 per share in an all-cash transaction.

    "The board of directors of Red Hat recommends that stockholders vote in favour of the merger with IBM," the company said in a statement on 11 December.

  • IBM exec: Why buying Red Hat is better than partnership

Linux Foundation: ONAP, the Joint Development Foundation and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Foundation's ONAP 'Casablanca' Enables 5G Management

    Today’s topics include the Linux Foundation adding new features to ONAP Casablanca for 5G enablement, and Censys raising seed money to expand internet scanning for threat hunting.

    The Linux Foundation's LF Networking project group last week took the next step in delivering an open-source platform to enable telecom providers to deploy next-generation network services.

  • The Joint Development Foundation Joins the Linux Foundation Family to Drive Adoption of Open Source and Standards

    The Linux Foundation and the Joint Development Foundation today announced an agreement to bring the Joint Development Foundation into the Linux Foundation family to make it easier to collaborate through both open source and standards development. The Joint Development Foundation is a nonprofit that provides a “standards organization in a box” to enable groups to quickly establish projects. With today’s news, the Linux Foundation and the Joint Development Foundation plan to provide greater capabilities for communities to engage in open source and standards development to speed industry adoption.

    “Linux Foundation communities have been engaged in developing open standards and specifications around Linux since day one and more recently with newer efforts such as OpenChain and the Open Container Initiative to collectively solve technical challenges,” said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of the Linux Foundation. “Leveraging the capabilities of the Joint Development Foundation will enable us to provide open source projects with another path to standardization, driving greater industry adoption of standards and specifications to speed adoption.”

  • How CNCF Is Growing the Cloud Landscape at KubeCon

    Thousands of developers, vendors and end users alike are descending on Seattle from Dec. 11-13 for the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America event. They are all here to learn and talk about the growing cloud native landscape, anchored by the Kubernetes container orchestration system.

    Among those at KubeCon is Chris Aniszczyk, Chief Operating Officer of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). In a video interview with eWEEK, Aniszczyk provides insight into the KubeCon event as well as highlighting the current and future direction of the CNCF, which now hosts 31 different open-source efforts.

    [...]

    Aniszczyk is also particularly enthusiastic about the Envoy project, which was created by ride-sharing company Lyft and officially joined the CNCF in September 2017. Envoy is a service mesh reverse proxy technology that is used to help scale micro-services data traffic. Among the organizations that are now using Envoy are Square, Stripe, Amazon and Google.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Adobe and GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

An Initial Look At The Intel Iris Gallium3D Driver Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

One of the most exciting developments in the open-source Intel driver space this year was the Iris Gallium3D driver taking shape as what's destined to eventually succeed their "classic" i965 Mesa driver. With Iris Gallium3D maturing, here's a look at how the performance currently stacks up to their mature OpenGL driver.

The Intel Iris Gallium3D driver is designed for Skylake (potentially Broadwell too) support and newer generations while being a forward-looking driver and utilizes their mature NIR compiler support. Iris holds much more performance potential than their classic Mesa driver albeit the developers haven't really taken to performance optimizations yet but rather getting the driver up and running, eliminating test suite failures, and getting to the point of feature parity with the i965 driver.

Read more

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Epic Store influences developers to pull Steam releases

    Some game developers are pulling their upcoming releases from the Steam page entirely, or choosing to make their titles a timed exclusive with the Epic Games Store.

  • DiRT 4 Coming to macOS and Linux in 2019

    Feral Interactive today announced that DiRT 4, the acclaimed off-road and rally racing game, will be released on macOS and Linux in 2019. Originally developed and published by Codemasters for PC and consoles, DiRT 4 is the latest of the studio's world-renowned racing games to be brought to macOS and Linux by Feral, following the success of DiRT Rally, GRID Autosport, and F1 2017.

  • Doom’s next expansion pack, made by John Romero, will be free—or cost up to $166

    John Romero—co-creator of the classic and influential 1990s first-person shooter Doom—has announced that he will release 18 new levels for the game for its 25th anniversary next year.

  • HEARTBEAT, a monster-filled RPG looks really sweet and it's getting a Linux version

    While it may not arrive for Linux at release, the developer of the sweet looking RPG HEARTBEAT has confirmed their intention to do a Linux build.

    Speaking on both itch.io and Steam, they seem rather positive about putting out a Linux version of their rather interesting adventure.

  • Jon Shafer's At the Gates to finally released next month, with Linux support

    After nearly seven years of development, the strategy game Jon Shafer's At the Gates is going to release next month with Linux support. For those who don't recognise the name, Shafer is the designer behind Civilization V.

    A game I completely lost track of, after previously highlighting it back in 2013. The developer announced on Twitter today, that the release is finally happening on January 23rd, 2019. After sending a quick message, the developer confirmed to us Linux will see support at release.

  • Rocket League updated with progression tweaks and a second Rocket Pass

    Rocket League, the insanely addictive rocket-powered sports game from Psyonix, Inc. has a few important tweaks released along with the second Rocket Pass.

    Firstly, let's quickly go over the progression changes. They're not overly dramatic, but there's some nice differences. From now, every time you touch the ball you will get two points (limited to one per second), the win bonus was doubled from 50 to 100, the Weekly Win Bonus was expanded from two to three games along with a max per week going up from 14 to 21 wins. On top of that, placement matches now count towards your Bronze Season Reward Level which is a nice tweak.

    Additionally, they've finally added some leaderboards for the new Ranked modes and there's also plenty of bug fixes that have come in this month.

  • The Odd Realm to enter Early Access on Steam with Linux support in January

    The Odd Realm, the simulation game where you will lead a group of settlers to a new home is coming to Steam next month. Get your calendar out, mark down January 11th, 2019 for when it will be up and ready for purchase on Steam.

    We recently highlighted this one, so it might sound familiar. However, we didn't know when it would be coming to Steam.

  • The developer of the retro FPS 'DUSK' has confirmed a Linux build is on the way

    While we knew DUSK would be getting a Linux version, it's always good to see confirmation that's up to date and positive.

    When asked this month on Steam, if it was coming to Linux the developer said "Yep! Linux / Mac builds are on the way! STAY TUNED" which is a rather clear-cut reply about it.

  • Battle Royale Tycoon has you designing and building arenas to watch the AI fight

    Now available with Linux support in Early Access, Battle Royale Tycoon flips the hype train upside down and has you building the arena rather than fighting in it.

    I must admit, I'm surprised. I was genuinely expecting this to see a wave of negative reviews. So far though, it seems players actually like it. I'm happy to see that, because it's actually quite an interesting idea for a building/tycoon style game. It's styled more like a theme park building game, with you setting up various battle arenas.

Mozilla Firefox 64.0

Filed under
Moz/FF

Red Hat Openwashing Leadership, Promoting VirtIO-FS and Explaining HID

Filed under
Red Hat
  • 5 things you won't learn from The Open Organization Leaders Manual

    Today the open organization community—a global group of writers, consultants, theorists, managers, and other organizational leaders dedicated to helping others understand how open principles can transform organizational culture and design—unveiled the second edition of The Open Organization Leaders Manual. Billed as "a handbook for building innovative and engaged teams," the book is available now as a Creative Commons-licensed eBook and a paperback.

  • Companies behind on digital transformation get ahead with open leaders

    One source of that disruption is digitization. Digitization is reshaping the way we lead, manage, and work. Even in the scope of the last decade, we've seen rapid adjustments to how we live, connect, and receive services. While we've been discussing ad nauseum how (or whether) we should be redefining organizational cultures and business models, the clock has been ticking, and the pace of digitization has not been slowing. In his book The Digital Matrix: New Rules for Business Transformation Through Technology, author Venkat Venkatraman argues that, by 2025, differences between digital and non-digital functions, processes, and business models will no longer exist.

  • VirtIO-FS: A Proposed Better Approach For Sharing Folders/Files With Guest VMs

    Red Hat developers have proposed a new VirtIO-FS component to provide better support for shared folders/files between the host and guest virtual machines. 

    VirtIO-FS was developed out of the need to share folders/files with guest VMs in a fast, consistent, and secure manner. They designed VirtIO-FS for Kata containers but coud be used with other VMs too. The closest existing project to fulfilling their needs was Virtio-9p, but there were performance issues and other factors leading them to designing this new solution.

  • Peter Hutterer: Understanding HID report descriptors

    This time we're digging into HID - Human Interface Devices and more specifically the protocol your mouse, touchpad, joystick, keyboard, etc. use to talk to your computer.

    Remember the good old days where you had to install a custom driver for every input device? Remember when PS/2 (the protocol) had to be extended to accommodate for mouse wheels, and then again for five button mice. And you had to select the right protocol to make it work. Yeah, me neither, I tend to suppress those memories because the world is awful enough as it is.

    As users we generally like devices to work out of the box. Hardware manufacturers generally like to add bits and bobs because otherwise who would buy that new device when last year's device looks identical. This difference in needs can only be solved by one superhero: Committee-man, with the superpower to survive endless meetings and get RFCs approved.

    Many many moons ago, when USB itself was in its infancy, Committee man and his sidekick Caffeine boy got the USB consortium agree on a standard for input devices that is so self-descriptive that operating systems (Win95!) can write one driver that can handle this year's device, and next year's, and so on. No need to install extra drivers, your device will just work out of the box. And so HID was born. This may only an approximate summary of history.

    Originally HID was designed to work over USB. But just like Shrek the technology world is obsessed with layers so these days HID works over different transport layers. HID over USB is what your mouse uses, HID over i2c may be what your touchpad uses. HID works over Bluetooth and it's celebrity-diet version BLE. Somewhere, someone out there is very slowly moving a mouse pointer by sending HID over carrier pigeons just to prove a point. Because there's always that one guy.

    HID is incredibly simple in that the static description of the device can just be bytes burnt into the ROM like the Australian sun into unprepared English backpackers. And the event frames are often an identical series of bytes where every bit is filled in by the firmware according to the axis/buttons/etc.

Canonical makes Kubernetes moves

Filed under
Ubuntu

When last I spoke to Mark Shuttleworth, Canonical's founder, in Berlin, he told me that -- when it comes to Kubernetes -- enterprise "Kubernetes runs on Ubuntu." Kubernetes, the most popular cloud container orchestration program, "makes life easier for people who want portability across public clouds. With multiple Kubernetes clusters you have one common way to run workloads on Linux over both private and public clouds."

Read more

Devices: Raspberry Pi, Winmate (With Intel ME Back Doors), and Purism

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi projects for IT professionals

    The single-board design is affordable and has been used to promote computer science in schools. Despite this and a strong consumer base, the applications for Raspberry Pi have become more advanced over the years beyond just education and is being used in industry too.

    There are various ways the Raspberry Pi can be embedded to create huge value in the enterprise world. Such projects developed using Raspberry Pi may transform traditional businesses.

    Here are some ways to use Raspberry Pi effectively in your business.

  • Apollo Lake mini-PC offers WiFi and a USB Type-C port with DP

    Winmate’s rugged, Linux-friendly “EAC Mini EACIL22S” mini-PC runs on an Intel Apollo Lake processor and offers 64GB eMMC, WiFi, a DisplayPort-ready USB Type-C port, and dual GbE and USB 2.0 ports,

    Winmate has begun adding some Linux-supported systems to its largely Windows-driven embedded lineup, including the recent FM10A VMC touch-panel computer for forklifts. Now, it has launched a rugged, Apollo Lake based mini-PC with Ubuntu 16.04, Linux 4.1.5, or Win 10 IoT Enterprise. The 115 x 90 x 31mm, 0.8 Kilogram EAC Mini EACIL22S follows a similar, but NXP i.MX6 based, EAC Mini EACFA20 system that runs Android 6.0.

  • Break Free from Privacy Prison with Purism

    As 2018 comes to a close, people around the world have to face the stark truth of surveillance capitalism. Nearly all consumer products — speakers, phones, cars, and perhaps even mattresses — are recording devices, storing metrics on our movements and behavior. The New York Times just published a detailed report on location tracking in leaky Android and iOS apps. That’s just a fact of life when people use smartphones, right? Wrong. In 2019, Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone will be proof that no one has to live with spies in their pockets.

    If anything has changed since Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, it’s that more and more people are jumping ship from the Frightful Five: Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft. At Purism, we offer an alternative to the polluted software ecosystems of these tech giants.

    Our code is Free and Open-Source Software (FOSS), the industry standard in security because it can be verified by experts and amateurs alike. The software on our Librem laptops and our upcoming phone stands on a strong, foundational chain of trust that is matched by hardware features such as kill switches. These switches give people the added assurance that their devices won’t record or “phone home” to advertisers, spies, and cyber criminals. Turn off WiFi, microphone, and webcam on the Librem 5 and they’re off, no question about it.

Graphics: V3D, AMD/Vega, Flicker-Free Boot

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • V3D Compute, VC4 display, PM

    For V3D last week, I resurrected my old GLES 3.1 series with SSBO and shader imgae support, rebuilt it for V3D 4.1 (shader images no longer need manual tiling), and wrote indirect draw support and started on compute shaders. As of this weekend, dEQP-GLES31 is passing 1387/1567 of tests with “compute” in the name on the simulator. I have a fix needed for barrier(), then it’s time to build the kernel interface. In the process, I ended up fixing several job flushing bugs, plugging memory leaks, improving our shader disassembly debug dumps, and reducing memory consumption and CPU overhead.

  • AMD Outs New Vega 10 & 20 IDs With Linux Driver Patch

    AMD may have accidentally revealed some new products containing its Radeon RX Vega 10 and Radeon RX Vega 20 graphics technologies. The company patched its RadeonSI Mesa and AMDKFD/AMDGPU kernel drivers with new PCI IDs; no other changes were made with the patch.

    Phoronix reported that the patch added six new IDs released to Vega 10: 0x6869, 0x686A, 0x686B, 0x686D, 0x686E, and 0x686F. These are new IDs that were previously only referenced in an update to macOS Mojave and GPUOpen's lists of GFX9 parts. That could mean AMD plans to introduce new Vega 10 products sooner than later, but the company might also be internally testing new products that are a ways from release.

  • AMD Files Trademark For Vega II

    It looks like AMD could be announcing Vega II as new 7nm Vega GPUs soon complementing the recently announced Vega 20 Radeon Instinct MI50 / MI60 accelerators.

  • Arch Linux Users With Intel Graphics Can Begin Enjoying A Flicker-Free Boot

    It looks like the recent efforts led by Red Hat / Fedora on providing a flicker-free Linux boot experience and thanks to their upstream-focused approach is starting to pay off for the other desktop Linux distributions... A flicker-free boot experience can now be achieved on Arch Linux with the latest packages, assuming you don't have any quirky hardware. 

    A Phoronix reader reported in earlier today that Arch Linux as of the 4.19.8-arch1-1-ARCH kernel is working out well for the seamless/flicker-free boot experience. The caveat though -- like with Fedora -- is that it only works with Intel graphics hardware/driver for now and does require setting the "i915.fastboot=1" kernel module parameter.

KDE4 and Plasma 5 for Slackware

Filed under
KDE
Slack
  • KDE4 and Qt4 deprecation in FreeBSD

    This is a reminder — for those who don’t read all of the FreeBSD mailing lists — that KDE4 is marked deprecated in the official ports tree for FreeBSD, and will be removed at the end of this year (in about 20 days). Then Qt4 will be removed from the official ports tree in mid-march.

    Since both pieces of software are end-of-life and unmaintained upstream already for several years, the kde@ team at FreeBSD no longer can maintain them. Recent time-sinks were dealing with OpenSSL 1.1.1, libressl, C++17, .. the code is old, and there’s newer, nicer, better-maintained code available generally by replacing 4 with 5.

  • KDE Plasma 5 for Slackware – end of the year edition

    I just uploaded a whole new batch of packages containing KDE Plasma5 for Slackware. The previous batch, KDE 5_18.10 is already two months old and has some library compatibility issues. The new KDE 5_18.12 for Slackware consists of KDE Frameworks 5.53.0, Plasma 5.14.4 and Applications 18.08.3. All this on top of Qt 5.11.3.
    Compiled on the latest Slackware -current, it’s running smoothly here on my laptop.
    I decided against upgrading to QT 5.12.0. This is a new LTS release, but I will wait for the other distros to find bugs in this new software. Next week, KDE will release KDE Applications 18.12.0 and that too is something I want to check a bit before releasing Slackware packages. Therefore it’s likely that a new batch of packages containing Qt 5.12 and KDE Applications 18.12 will see the light shortly after the New Year.

Programming: GCC, LLVM, Rust, Ruby and Python

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • GCC 9 Guts Out The PowerPC SPE Support

    It should come as no surprise since it was deprecated in this year's GCC 8 release, but the PowerPC SPE code has been removed.

    This isn't to be confused with conventional POWER/PowerPC but rather PowerPC SPE that is for the "Signal Processing Engine" on older FreeScale/IBM cores like the e500. It's not all that important these days and doesn't affect newer versions of the 64-bit Power support.

  • LLVM's OpenMP Runtime Picks Up DragonFlyBSD & OpenBSD Support

    Good news for those using the LLVM Clang compiler on OpenBSD or DragonFlyBSD: the OpenMP run-time should now be supported with the latest development code.

  • Nick Cameron: Rust in 2022

    In case you missed it, we released our second edition of Rust this year! An edition is an opportunity to make backwards incompatible changes, but more than that it's an opportunity to bring attention to how programming in Rust has changed. With the 2018 edition out of the door, now is the time to think about the next edition: how do we want programming in Rust in 2022 to be different to programming in Rust today? Once we've worked that out, lets work backwards to what should be done in 2019.

    Without thinking about the details, lets think about the timescale and cadence it gives us. It was three years from Rust 1.0 to Rust 2018 and I expect it will be three years until the next edition. Although I think the edition process went quite well, I think that if we'd planned in advance then it could have gone better. In particular, it felt like there were a lot of late changes which could have happened earlier so that we could get more experience with them. In order to avoid that I propose that we aim to avoid breaking changes and large new features landing after the end of 2020. That gives 2021 for finishing, polishing, and marketing with a release late that year. Working backwards, 2020 should be an 'impl year' - focussing on designing and implementing the things we know we want in place for the 2021 edition. 2019 should be a year to invest while we don't have any release pressure.

    To me, investing means paying down technical debt, looking at our processes, infrastructure, tooling, governance, and overheads to see where we can be more efficient in the long run, and working on 'quality of life' improvements for users, the kind that don't make headlines but will make using Rust a better experience. It's also the time to investigate some high-risk, high-reward ideas that will need years of iteration to be user-ready; 2019 should be an exciting year!

  • A Java Developer Walks Into A Ruby Conference: Charles Nutter’s Open Source Journey

    As a Java developer, Nutter began looking for an existing way to run Ruby within a Java runtime environment, specifically a Java virtual machine (JVM). This would let Ruby programs run on any hardware or software platform supported by a JVM, and would facilitate writing polyglot applications that used some Java and some Ruby, with developers free to choose whichever language was best for a particular task.

  • Good ciphers in OpenJDK
  • Don’t delete the same file in its own directory
  • Create a home button on the pause scene

Audiocasts/Shows: Going Linux, Linux Thursday and More

Filed under
Reviews
  • Going Linux #358 · Listener Feedback

    This month we have voice feedback from Paul, suggestions on alternatives for G+, a question on OpenVPN, feedback and problems moving to Linux. Troy provides a Going Linux story on software for Linux users.

  • Linux Thursday - Dec 6, 2018
  • Gnocchi: A Scalable Time Series Database For Your Metrics with Julien Danjou - Episode 189

    Do you know what your servers are doing? If you have a metrics system in place then the answer should be “yes”. One critical aspect of that platform is the timeseries database that allows you to store, aggregate, analyze, and query the various signals generated by your software and hardware. As the size and complexity of your systems scale, so does the volume of data that you need to manage which can put a strain on your metrics stack. Julien Danjou built Gnocchi during his time on the OpenStack project to provide a time oriented data store that would scale horizontally and still provide fast queries. In this episode he explains how the project got started, how it works, how it compares to the other options on the market, and how you can start using it today to get better visibility into your operations.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Adobe and GNU/Linux

Android Leftovers

An Initial Look At The Intel Iris Gallium3D Driver Performance

One of the most exciting developments in the open-source Intel driver space this year was the Iris Gallium3D driver taking shape as what's destined to eventually succeed their "classic" i965 Mesa driver. With Iris Gallium3D maturing, here's a look at how the performance currently stacks up to their mature OpenGL driver. The Intel Iris Gallium3D driver is designed for Skylake (potentially Broadwell too) support and newer generations while being a forward-looking driver and utilizes their mature NIR compiler support. Iris holds much more performance potential than their classic Mesa driver albeit the developers haven't really taken to performance optimizations yet but rather getting the driver up and running, eliminating test suite failures, and getting to the point of feature parity with the i965 driver. Read more