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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

My Thoughts On Pop OS 20.04 After One Month

I’ve been using Linux for around 10 years now; most of that has been Ubuntu based distributions, but I also spent a couple of years on Fedora too. In recent years I’ve flipped from being a distro hopper to preferring stable systems that I know intimately well.

My desktop, for example, has gone from running Pop OS 18.04, right the way through to the current 20.04 release. Because Pop follows the Ubuntu 6 month release cycle, that’s 4 major OS upgrades.

Throughout that time, I haven’t had a single issue with Pop OS, which I think is a testament to the stability of modern Linux distributions.

Anyway, on with my thoughts…

Read more

Security and FUD

  • A new Java-based ransomware targets Windows and Linux [Ed: So... do not install it?]
  • GNU Linux – a pretty old vulnerability in ppp(d) was fixed (risk of remote exploit)

    Debian says the problem is fixed in many versions. The table below lists information on source packages. Make sure to keep all internet facing systems as up to date as possible. [...] The pppd daemon works in conjunction with the core PPP driver to establish and maintain a PPP connection with another system (called a partner) and negotiate IP addresses for each end of the connection.

  • Cooking up secure code: A foolproof recipe for open source [Ed: Companies that sell fear of FOSS are overstating the threat whilst never speaking about back doors in proprietary components, software etc.]

    Even if two components have the same name, they can be very different depending on which organization or developer community has created them, or the various iterations and forks which they have experienced. While they might share similar purpose or functionality, these components might contain slight changes that reflect the needs or preferences of the people who influenced their evolution. A good example of this is the difference between Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Ubuntu. In practice, these slight differences can add up to create a significant impact on functionality, compatibility, and security, and thus must be considered when researching which “recipe” to follow.

KDE: Manuskript, LabPlot and Krita

  • Repo Review: Manuskript

    Manuskript is a program designed to assist with the writing of fictional stories and non-fiction papers. It allows you to easily organize all your ideas for plots, characters, and world details, create an outline, and then let you begin writing your first drafts. When you first launch Manuskript, you need to select which kind of project you want to create, though there isn't really that much difference between the fiction and non-fiction project types (Non-fiction projects are divided into sections rather than chapters). You can then set how many chapters you want it to have, how many scenes per chapter, and a word count goal for each scene. This can all be adjusted at a later stage from the Editor tab. [...] Manuskript is a great planning and organizing tool for writers, though it definitely seems to be intended more for fiction than non-fiction. I did unfortunately encounter a few bugs though, but the program is still fairly early in development. I'm not really much of a fiction writer myself, so I probably won't be using Manuskript that much, but I can definitely see how useful it could be for some writers.

  • Recent developments for the coming release

    Despite a very active development in the recent couple of weeks, we still need to finalize a couple of things before we can do the release for version 2.8. While going through the remaining issues, we found some time to work on users’ suggestions, test our nightly builds and provide feedback. We fixed several reported bugs and also implemented a couple of smaller features that were recently requested. The purpose of this short post is to update you on the latest developments. LabPlot supports different analysis methods, like fitting, smoothing, Fourier transformation, etc. For smoothing we recently added the calculation of rough values. The difference between the approximating smooth function and the original data is called “rough” in this context (data = smooth + rough). This is very similar to the calculation of “residuals” for the fit algorithms. In 2.8 we calculate and expose the rough values, made it possible to visualize them and to check the goodness of the smoothing process.

  • Status update: Linux

    I didn’t believe her, seeing that it only happened inside Krita. I converted Disney’s existing imageSynth2 demo and compiled it inside our toolchain to see if it was the compiler instead, but to no avail. Without any other options left, I jumped deep inside the rabbit hole that is SeExpr’s parser, and started by tracing the calls that yield the (truncated) constants. The state dump I posted before says a class called N7SeExpr211ExprNumNodeE represents them; this is just a mangled name for the ExprNumNode class. I put a breakpoint on the value() call, but the value had already been truncated. I tested with the constructor itself, but wasn’t able to get the actual value, as it’d been <optimized out> according to gdb.