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More in Tux Machines

Libre Graphics Meeting (LGM) 2020 and State of the Source Summit

  • LGM 2020 : my experience running an online international conference

    Last week was the Libre Graphics Meeting (LGM) 2020 online conference. The LGM is normally an occasion for all the contributors of graphics related Free Software to meet physically, and this year we had planned to organize it in our city of Rennes, France. But of course, with the current situation, we were forced to cancel the physical event. We hesitated to make an online event instead, as the biggest interest in this event is to have a physical meeting. We ran a poll to see if there was enough interest for an online event, and the result showed us that there was. As several people asked me about the technical setup used for the stream, I’m going to explain it here. I was inspired a lot by the solution used for the Libre Planet conference, which used a jitsi meet instance to receive the stream of remote speakers, and sent it to an icecast server using a GStreamer based script to record the screen. The first difference is that we decided to ask all the speakers to send a pre-recorded video of their presentation. We felt it was safer to get a good quality source for the talks, as some speakers may not have enough bandwidth on their internet connection for a reliable high-quality live session. And it was also safer to have a good quality recording available to publish the videos after the event.

  • State of the Source Summit

    The State of the Source Summit invites open source communities of practice from around the world to organize and contribute to a global conversation on the current state of open source software: non-technical issues that foster development and community, the licenses that enable collaboration, the practices that promote contribution, and the issues confronting cooperation.

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: FLOSS Weekly, BSDNow and Linux Mint 20 Backgrounds Slideshow

  • FLOSS Weekly 581: Purism

    Doc Searls and Simon Phipps talk to Kyle Rankin, Chief Security Officer and Vice President at Purism. Purism is security focussed software & hardware company that believes in building products that respect and protect individuals' privacy, security, and freedom.

  • BSDNow 353: ZFS on Ironwolf

    Scheduling in NetBSD, ZFS vs. RAID on Ironwolf disks, OpenBSD on Microsoft Surface Go 2, FreeBSD for Linux sysadmins, FreeBSD on Lenovo T480, and more.

  • Linux Mint 20 Backgrounds Slideshow

    In this video, we are looking at the beautiful backgrounds of the upcoming Linux Mint 20.

Servers: Kubernetes, Benchmarks and OpenStack

  • Longhorn Simplifies Distributed Block Storage in Kubernetes

    Today we’re announcing the general availability of Longhorn, an enterprise-grade, cloud-native container storage solution. Longhorn directly answers the need for an enterprise-grade, vendor-neutral persistent storage solution that supports the easy development of stateful applications within Kubernetes. We’ve been working on Longhorn for almost as long as we’ve been around as a company. We launched the project in 2017, and then in 2019, we contributed it to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as a sandbox project. So it’s that CNCF open source project that is now generally available.

  • Supporting the Evolving Ingress Specification in Kubernetes 1.18

    Earlier this year, the Kubernetes team released Kubernetes 1.18, which extended Ingress. In this blog post, we’ll walk through what’s new in the new Ingress specification, what it means for your applications, and how to upgrade to an ingress controller that supports this new specification.

  • Benchmarks Of 2nd Gen AMD EPYC On Amazon EC2 Against Intel Xeon, Graviton2

    Today AMD and Amazon announced the general availability of 2nd Gen AMD EPYC "Rome" processors available via the Elastic Compute Cloud. AMD EPYC "Rome" on EC2 with the new "C5a" instance types offer very competitive performance against the latest Intel Xeon instance types, Amazon's own Graviton2 Arm-based instances, and a big upgrade compared to the first-generation EPYC processors in the cloud.

  • OpenStack Ussuri for Ubuntu 20.04 and 18.04 LTS

    The Ubuntu OpenStack team at Canonical is pleased to announce the general availability of OpenStack Ussuri on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS via the Ubuntu Cloud Archive.

Debian Leftovers and Developers

  • Antoine Beaupré: Replacing Smokeping with Prometheus

    I've been struggling with replacing parts of my old sysadmin monitoring toolkit (previously built with Nagios, Munin and Smokeping) with more modern tools (specifically Prometheus, its "exporters" and Grafana) for a while now. Replacing Munin with Prometheus and Grafana is fairly straightforward: the network architecture ("server pulls metrics from all nodes") is similar and there are lots of exporters. They are a little harder to write than Munin modules, but that makes them more flexible and efficient, which was a huge problem in Munin. I wrote a Migrating from Munin guide that summarizes those differences. Replacing Nagios is much harder, and I still haven't quite figured out if it's worth it. [...] A naive implementation of Smokeping in Prometheus/Grafana would be to use the blackbox exporter and create a dashboard displaying those metrics. I've done this at home, and then I realized that I was missing something.

  • Reproducible Builds in May 2020

    One of the original promises of open source software is that distributed peer review and transparency of process results in enhanced end-user security. Nonetheless, whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free and open source software for malicious flaws, almost all software today is distributed as pre-compiled binaries. This allows nefarious third-parties to compromise systems by injecting malicious code into seemingly secure software during the various compilation and distribution processes.

  • Steve McIntyre: Interesting times, and a new job!

    It's been over ten years since I started in Arm, and nine since I joined Linaro as an assignee. It was wonderful working with some excellent people in both companies, but around the end of last year I started to think that it might be time to look for something new and different. As is the usual way in Cambridge, I ended up mentioning this to friends and things happened! [...] Where do I fit in? Pexip is a relatively small company with a very flat setup in engineering, so that's a difficult question to answer! I'll be starting working in the team developing and maintaining PexOS, the small Linux-based platform on which other things depend. (No prizes for guessing which distro it's based on!) But there's lots of scope to get involved in all kinds of other areas as needs and interests arise. I can't wait to get stuck in! Although I'm no longer going to be working on Debian arm port issues on work time, I'm still planning to help where I can. Let's see how that works...