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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Linux Headlines, and Going Linux

  • LHS Episode #337: SDRAngel Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to Episode 337 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts take a deep dive into the shallow end of SDRAngel. The project is a GPLv3 licensed, modular front end and headless server for connecting to and operating SDR receivers and transceivers. Discussion includes where to find the software, how to build it, basic operation with broadcast FM stations, DMR, SSB, CW and more. Take a look. Try it out. Have fun with SDR. Hope you enjoy!

  • 2020-04-07 | Linux Headlines

    Microsoft proposes a new Linux kernel security mechanism, Firefox 75 rolls out significant changes, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation adopts Argo, and The Linux Foundation aims to boost adoption of the seL4 secure microkernel.

  • Going Linux #389 · Listener Feedback

    Bill burns out on distrohopping after providing multiple release reviews. Our listeners provide feedback on new user recommendations, hard drive mounting, encryption, trying Linux via USB, and the Linux Spotlight interview. We answer questions on security audit results. Episode 389 Time Stamps 00:00 Going Linux #389 · Listener Feedback 01:43 Bill burns out on distro hopping 02:24 but he has some feedback on a few releases 02:46 Linux Mint 19.3 03:24 Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 04:38 Endevour OS 07:13 ArcoLinux 10:19 Open Suse 12:16 Ubuntu MATE 14:49 Zorin 17:55 New user recommendations 24:22 Gregory: Hard drive mounting 27:28 Gregory: Great interview 30:09 John: Security audit recommendations 34:19 George: Paul's encryption problem 37:57 David: Linux via USB 44:09 goinglinux.com, goinglinux@gmail.com, +1-904-468-7889, @goinglinux, feedback, listen, subscribe 45:17 End

Linux powered automotive computer is loaded with wireless

Eurotech’s rugged “DynaGate 20-30” is an automotive-certified IoT edge gateway that runs Linux on an Apollo Lake SoC with LTE Cat 4, WiFi, BLE, GPS, 2x GbE, and isolated DIO, serial, and CAN. A week after announcing a BoltGate 20-31 transportation computer aimed at rolling stock applications, Eurotech has unveiled an “automotive-certified Multi-service IoT Edge Gateway.” The fanless DynaGate 20-30 runs the same Yocto-derived Eurotech Everyware Linux distribution with Eclipse tooling and Azul Java support on the same Intel Apollo Lake platform used by the BoltGate 20-31. Read more

Red Hat Promoting Linux Containers

  • Why Linux containers are a CIO's best friend

    CIOs have many challenges today (to say the least), but one of the biggest is enabling the constant development and delivery of new applications — no longer a "nice to have" but a "must have" in today's ever-changing business and global environments. There are many tools that can help CIOs provide this support, but one of the most important is Linux containers. In a recent Smarter with Gartner report, Gartner Distinguished VP Analyst Gene Alvarez named "enabling and balancing product and project management of applications to focus on delivering business outcomes while maintaining highly reliable core business operations" as being one of the key challenges CIOs face in 2020. Organizations are turning to containers as a way to provide this business-technology balance. Indeed, the use of Linux containers has increased significantly in just the last year.

  • Be careful when pulling images by short name
  • Migrating applications to OpenShift, Part 1: Overview

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (kernel, kernel-headers, and kernel-tools), openSUSE (glibc and qemu), Red Hat (chromium-browser, container-tools:1.0, container-tools:rhel8, firefox, ipmitool, kernel, kernel-rt, krb5-appl, ksh, nodejs:10, nss-softokn, python, qemu-kvm, qemu-kvm-ma, telnet, and virt:rhel), Scientific Linux (ipmitool and telnet), SUSE (ceph and firefox), and Ubuntu (haproxy, linux, linux-aws, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-5.3, linux-hwe, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-oracle-5.3, linux-raspi2, linux-raspi2-5.3, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, and linux, linux-hwe).

  • Josh Bressers: Who are the experts

    These are certainly strange times we are living in. None of us will ever forget what’s happening and we will all retell stories for the rest of our days. Many of us asked “tell me about the depression grandma”, similar questions will be asked of us someday. The whirlwind of confusion and chaos got me thinking about advice and who we listen to. Most of us know a staggering number of people who are apparently experts in immunology. I have no intention of talking about the politics of the current times, goodness knows nobody in their right mind should care what I think. What all this does have me pondering is what are experts and how can we decide who we should listen to? So I’ve been thinking a lot about “experts” lately. Especially in the context of security. There have been a ton of expert opinions on how to work from home, and how to avoid getting scammed, which video conferencing software is the best (or worst). There are experts everywhere, but which ones should we listen to? I’m not an expert in anything, but there are some topics I know enough about to question some of these “experts”.

  • seL4 Microkernel Optimized for Security Gets Support of Linux Foundation

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host the seL4 Foundation, the nonprofit organization established by Data61, the digital specialist arm for Australia’s national science agency CSIRO. The seL4 microkernel is the world’s first operating system (OS) kernel that is proved secure; it is designed to ensure the security, safety and reliability of real-world critical computer systems. The new Foundation aims to accelerate the development of seL4 and related technologies, and under the Linux Foundation will provide a global, independent and neutral organization for funding and steering the future evolution of seL4. Founding members include Cog Systems, DornerWorks, Ghost Locomotion, HENSOLD Cyber and UNSW Sydney. The trustworthiness of embedded computing systems is vital to improving the security of critical systems around the world to safeguard them from cyber threats. This is particularly paramount in industries including avionics, autonomous vehicles, medical devices, critical infrastructure and defense. The seL4 microkernel is the world’s first operating system with a proof of implementation correctness and presents an unparalleled combination of assurance, generality and performance, making it an ideal base for building security- and safety-critical systems. The seL4 Foundation provides a forum for developers to collaborate on growing and integrating the seL4 ecosystem.

  • The Linux Foundation Throws Weight Behind Secure Microkernel

    Gernot Heiser, who will serve as chair of the new foundation, said the seL4 is unique in that it is mathematically proven to be secure, which provides a robust foundation on which a new generation of embedded systems can be built to drive, for example, internet of things (IoT) applications. Founding members of the seL4 Foundation include Data61, University of New South Wales in Sydney, HENSOLDT Cyber GmbH, Ghost Locomotion Inc., Cog Systems Inc. and DornerWorks Ltd. The hosting of the seL4 Foundation is sure to add more fuel to an increasingly fierce debate over the future of operating systems. Advocates of microkernels contend operating systems in terms of functions and size should be kept to an absolute minimum to both ensure security and maximize flexibility.