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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Strapi introduces new open-source headless content management system

Strapi, the company behind the most popular open-source headless content management system (CMS), has announced the general availability of its Community Edition after two years of development. The business also announced paid support plans and disclosed plans for an Enterprise Edition, which is already in private beta testing. What's a headless CMS you ask? Unlike such popular CMSs as WordPress, Joomla, and Drupal, a headless CMS doesn't bother with the website's front-end. Instead, all its focus is on the back-end content repository, which is used for storing and delivering structured content. This content is then made available for display via a RESTful API, typically using JSON or XML. Read more

today's leftovers

  • A pandemic-era LWN update

    We are living through interesting times that present challenges in a number of areas, including running a business. While we think of LWN primarily as a community resource, it is also a business that is not unaffected by the ongoing pandemic. It is, we figure, a good time for a status update, especially since we have some news to share. Never has our 2002 decision to move to a subscription model looked like a better idea. Revenue from advertising has reached a level that is essentially indistinguishable from zero, with little sign that it will improve anytime soon. But we didn't depend on advertising because we work directly for our readers; as long as you all support us, we will be in good shape. Subscriptions have definitely fallen off a bit in the last few months, and we've had subscribers dropping off with a note saying that they had lost their job and needed to cut expenses. But the drop-off has not yet reached a point where we are seriously concerned about it; for that, we can only say "thank you!" to all of you for continuing to support us as the world gets weirder. A special thank-you is due to all of you subscribing at the Project Leader or Supporter levels; it really does make a difference. [...] Back in 1997 when work began on what eventually became LWN, we were driven by a strong sense of optimism about the future of Linux and free software. That optimism has been tested by ups and downs over time, but it has largely been borne out; Linux has been more successful than any of us could have imagined, and LWN is still here at the center of it. And we are still optimistic; we have managed to pull together an outstanding community of readers that will continue to support us for as long as we keep doing good work.

  • An Introduction to the K8s-Infrastructure Working Group

    When Kubernetes was formed in 2014, Google undertook the task of building and maintaining the infrastructure necessary for keeping the project running smoothly. The tools itself were open source, but the Google Cloud Platform project used to run the infrastructure was internal-only, preventing contributors from being able to help out. In August 2018, Google granted the Cloud Native Computing Foundation $9M in credits for the operation of Kubernetes. The sentiment behind this was that a project such as Kubernetes should be both maintained and operated by the community itself rather than by a single vendor. A group of community members enthusiastically undertook the task of collaborating on the path forward, realizing that there was a more formal infrastructure necessary. They joined together as a cross-team working group with ownership spanning across multiple Kubernetes SIGs (Architecture, Contributor Experience, Release, and Testing). Aaron Crickenberger worked with the Kubernetes Steering Committee to enable the formation of the working group, co-drafting a charter alongside long-time collaborator Davanum Srinivas, and by 2019 the working group was official.

  • EuroBSDCon 2020 is cancelled.

    It is with great disappointment that we were forced to conclude it is not possible to run the conference as usual. As such, there will be no EuroBSDCon 2020.

    There will be no virtual conference, as we feel we can’t provide much in that area not already provided by BSDCan.

    We hope to resume our conference next year, in Vienna. We will try to announce the relevant dates as soon as possible.

  • Design and Web team summary – 27 May 2020

    The web team here at Canonical run two-week iterations. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work from this iteration. [...] My name is Bartek (also known as bartaz around the interwebz). I live in Poznań in Poland and I’m a web developer. I’ve been a software developer for over 10 years now, working in front-end related technologies for most of this time. IE6 was still a thing when I started trying to make browsers display what I want them to, jQuery was not a thing yet, and nobody even dreamed of React. I joined Canonical four years ago as a front-end developer to work on snap store dashboard and after about a year I moved to the Web and Design Team, where I continued working on snap related projects such as snapcraft.io and build.snapcraft.io. A couple of months ago I moved to Vanilla squad where I develop and enhance our Vanilla framework.

  • OPPO Find X2, X2 Neo, X2 Lite, and Moto G7 Android 10 kernel source code now available

    The foundation of the Android OS is built on top of the Linux kernel, thus Android device makers are obliged to provide the source code (upon request) for any Linux kernel binaries that ship on their devices. Besides the source code release for the retail release software, OEMs should also publish the updated Linux kernel source code for any future software updates in order to comply with the GNU General Public License v2. Motorola, for example, is quite good at releasing Linux kernel source code for all the updates they roll out, and they have now published the kernel source code for the Moto G7’s Android 10 update. OPPO, on the other hand, has shared the initial kernel sources for a bunch of phones from the Find X2 lineup.

  • CTO Talk: Q&A with Seldon’s Clive Cox

    I’m more of a “meeting the Buddha on the road” kind of guy. However, influences along the way have been the usual suspects like Alan Turing and people such as Richard Stallman who promoted open source.

  • IAR Systems delivers embedded software building on Linux

    The build tools for Linux include the highly optimising IAR C/C++ Compiler, IAR Assembler, Linker and library tools, and runtime libraries. The tools are validated to run on the Ubuntu Linux distribution version 18.04.3 and later, and currently supports Arm and Renesas RH850.

  • IAR Systems Releases Embedded Software Building on Linux

    IAR Systems announced its portfolio of embedded development tools has been extended with build tools that support implementations in Linux-based frameworks.

  • Machine vision computer supports 5GBase-T cameras

    Imago’s Linux-ready “VisionBox AGE-X5” computer has an Intel 6th Gen CPU plus 2x 5GbE ports for driving new 5GBase-T cameras. Also onboard: 2x GigE, 4x USB 3.0, DIO, LED controllers, and camera triggers. In recent years we have seen a growing number of embedded boards and systems with 2.5GbE and 10GbE ports, but no 5GbE ports that we can recall. However, the networking standard is now ready for the spotlight with the arrival of 5-Gigabit Ethernet bandwidth 5GBase-T cameras from Teledyne Dalsa and Lucid Vision Labs. Imago, which sells a line of VisionBox machine vision systems including the Jetson TX2 based VisionBox Daytona, announced a new VisionBox AGE-X5 model that can be preconfigured with either 5GBase-T camera.

Programming Leftovers

  • This Week in Rust 340
  • Simplify data visualization in Python with Plotly

    Plotly is a plotting ecosystem that allows you to make plots in Python, as well as JavaScript and R. In this series of articles, I'm focusing on plotting with Python libraries.

  • Perl Hacks, Perl School, and the future of Perl publishing

    Dave Cross, long-time Perl user, trainer, and author, recently released The Best of Perl Hacks, a curated collection of his best posts from his Perl Hacks blog. His imprint, Perl School, has published six e-books, including two that I wrote. There’s an unrelated book, Perl Hacks: Tips & Tools For Programming, Debugging, And Surviving, by chromatic, Damian Conway, and Curtis “Ovid” Poe. It’s also very good, but completely separate from Dave’s.

  • Qt for Automation changed to Qt M2M Protocols

    Qt M2M Protocols is now automatically included for free to every new Qt Device Creation subscription. The additional distribution license price has been removed as well. Qt Application Development license holders can buy Qt M2M Protocols separately.

  • Using Visual Studio Code for Qt Applications – Part Two

    In the last blog post we saw an essential, C++ oriented, Visual Studio Code setup. That was enough to get going right away, but we can still definitely do more and better. Here I’ll show you how to get a complete setup for your qmake and CMake projects, all this while also wearing a Qt hat (on top of my C++ hat) and having a deeper look at the Qt side. Build qmake Qt projects Qmake is not integrated with Visual Studio Code the way CMake is, so setting up a qmake project for build is slightly more convoluted than doing the same with CMake. This means we’ll have to define our own build tasks. We’re going to do this in two stages: build steps definition and build steps combination, leveraging the fact that Visual Studio Code implements task dependencies and ordered sequential execution of dependencies.

  • Where Did Software Go Wrong?

    Computers were supposed to be “a bicycle for our minds”, machines that operated faster than the speed of thought. And if the computer was a bicycle for the mind, then the plural form of computer, Internet, was a “new home of Mind.” The Internet was a fantastic assemblage of all the world’s knowledge, and it was a bastion of freedom that would make time, space, and geopolitics irrelevant. Ignorance, authoritarianism, and scarcity would be relics of the meatspace past.

    Things didn’t quite turn out that way. The magic disappeared and our optimism has since faded. Our websites are slow and insecure; our startups are creepy and unprofitable; our president Tweets hate speech; we don’t trust our social media apps, webcams, or voting machines. And in the era of coronavirus quarantining, we’re realizing just how inadequate the Internet turned out to be as a home of Mind. Where did it all go wrong?

  • good idea bad implementation crosstalk

    Unfortunately products like the latter seem quite common. Most things in my house are still rather dumb because regrettably few products are actually the same thing, but smarter. Instead smart devices are inevitably some inscrutable machine intelligence physically manifested in my house. So no thanks. Battle lines drawn, everybody pick a side, good idea or bad implementation, and fight!