Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Other

TopicRepliesCreatedLast replysort icon
Distros to add 3 5 years 8 weeks ago
by Roy Schestowitz
4 years 51 weeks ago
by vtel57
Is it too much to ask... 4 9 years 22 weeks ago
by bigbearomaha
9 years 4 weeks ago
by poodles
Seen in a Sig 34 14 years 8 weeks ago
by srlinuxx
9 years 24 weeks ago
by Béranger
Dialup dilemma 0 10 years 46 weeks ago
by afs
n/a
counter petition for microsoft Open XML standard fast track 0 12 years 1 week ago
by kamrananvaar
n/a
A question about the letter "L" 0 12 years 13 weeks ago
by eco2geek
n/a
CMS? 1 12 years 18 weeks ago
by GreenLantern
12 years 18 weeks ago
by srlinuxx
How do you take screenshots with the menu showing? 5 13 years 14 weeks ago
by Wolven
12 years 33 weeks ago
by Tips
KDE??? 3 13 years 19 weeks ago
by gryphen
13 years 19 weeks ago
by gryphen
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Docs Translations FAD Report, KDE Applications 19.04 in Flathub and Fedora 30 Upgrade Test Day

  • Fedora Docs Translations FAD Report
    Last week Jean-Baptiste Holcroft and Adam Šamalík met in Strasbourg for Docs Translations mini-FAD in order to prototype translations support for the Fedora Docs website. And we did a lot of work! This post is a report from the event, a status report, and a brief plan for how to move forward. Our goal was to make sure we’re both on the same page about how it’s all going to work, to do some coding and publish a functional prototype, and to write a set of requirements for a potential production deployment.
  • [Some] KDE Applications 19.04 also available in flathub
    The KDE Applications 19.04 release announcement (read it if you haven't, it's very complete) mentions some of the applications are available at the snap store, but forgets to mention flathub.
  • Fedora Community Blog: Fedora 30 Upgrade Test Day 2019-04-26
    Friday, 2019-04-26, is the Fedora 30 Upgrade Test Day! As part of this planned change for Fedora 30, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

Security: Curl, Two Factor Authentication (2FA) and Hacking With Kali Linux

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl + hackerone = TRUE
    There seems to be no end to updated posts about bug bounties in the curl project these days. Not long ago I mentioned the then new program that sadly enough was cancelled only a few months after its birth. Now we are back with a new and refreshed bug bounty program! The curl bug bounty program reborn.
  • Liz Fong-Jones on how to secure SSH with Two Factor Authentication (2FA)
    Liz mentions that by adding passphrase encryption, the private keys become resistant to theft when at rest. However, when they are in use, the usability challenges of re-entering the passphrase on every connection means that “engineers began caching keys unencrypted in memory of their workstations, and worse yet, forwarding the agent to allow remote hosts to use the cached keys without further confirmation”. The Matrix breach, which took place on April 11 showcases an example of what happens when authenticated sessions are allowed to propagate without a middle-man. The intruder in the Matrix breach had access to the production databases, potentially giving them access to unencrypted message data, password hashes, and access tokens.
  • Hacking With Kali Linux
    Before I talk about the series that I am going to start, let us briefly talk about who should follow this series. I know there are so many people out there who are very curious to learn hacking just to hack their partner's social media account. Well, if you are such a person, please listen to me. Hacking is not about getting into somebody's personal life and steal their information. It is illegal. Somebody well said - “We need to have a talk on the subject of what's yours and what's mine.” So you should not hack information that is not yours. ​But if you are a tech enthusiast who wants to make a career as a penetration tester or white hat hacker, this series can be really a good way to start. So for such enthusiasts, I am creating a page where you can follow the series. You can also follow our social media pages so you get a notification when a new informative article comes out.

Mozilla: VoxelJS, AiC and Mozilla B-Team

  • Mozilla VR Blog: VoxelJS: Chunking Magic
    A couple of weeks ago I relaunched VoxelJS with modern ThreeJS and modules support. Today I'm going to talk a little bit about how VoxelJS works internally, specifically how voxels are represented and drawn. This is the key magic part of a voxel engine and I owe a tremendous debt to Max Ogden, James Halliday and Mikola Lysenko Voxels are represented by numbers in a large three dimensional array. Each number says what type of block goes in that block slot, with 0 representing empty. The challenge is how to represent a potentially infinite set of voxels without slowing the computer to a crawl. The only way to do this is to load just a portion of the world at a time.
  • AiC: Collaborative summary documents
    One of my goals was that we could, at least for a moment, disconnect people from their particular position and turn their attention towards the goal of achieving a shared and complete summary. I didn’t feel that we were very succesful in this goal. For one thing, most participants simply left comments on parts they disagreed with; they didn’t themselves suggest alternate wording. That meant that I personally had to take their complaint and try to find some “middle ground” that accommodated the concern but preserved the original point. This was stressful for me and a lot of work. More importantly, it meant that most people continued to interact with the document as advocates for their point-of-view, rather than trying to step back and advocate for the completeness of the summary. In other words: when you see a sentence you disagree with, it is easy to say that you disagree with it. It is much harder to rephrase it in a way that you do agree with – but which still preserves (what you believe to be) the original intent. Doing so requires you to think about what the other person likely meant, and how you can preserve that. However, one possible reason that people may have been reluctant to offer suggestions is that, often, it was hard to make “small edits” that addressed people’s concerns. Especially early on, I found that, in order to address some comment, I would have to make larger restructurings. For example, taking a small sentence and expanding it to a bullet point of its own. Finally, some people who were active on the thread didn’t participate in the doc. Or, if they did, they did so by leaving comments on the original GitHub thread. This is not surprising: I was asking people to do something new and unfamiliar. Also, this whole process played out relatively quickly, and I suspect some people just didn’t even see the document before it was done. If I were to do this again, I would want to start it earlier in the process. I would also want to consider synchronous meetings, where we could go try to process edits as a group (but I think it would take some thought to figure out how to run such a meeting). In terms of functioning asynchronously, I would probably change to use a Google Doc instead of a Dropbox Paper. Google Docs have a better workflow for suggesting edits, I believe, as well, as a richer permissions model. Finally, I would try to draw a harder line in trying to get people to “own” the document and suggest edits of their own. I think the challenge of trying to neutrally represent someone else’s point of view is pretty powerful.
  • Mozilla B-Team: happy bmo push day!
    Bugfixes + enabling the new security feature for API keys.

Programming Leftovers