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TopicRepliesCreatedLast replysort icon
Mutiple Boot 1 14 years 31 weeks ago
by leamon
14 years 31 weeks ago
by srlinuxx
Distro Magic 2 14 years 7 weeks ago
by jdriller
14 years 5 weeks ago
by pharman
Linux Cheat sheets I have made 2 12 years 50 weeks ago
by pkrumins
12 years 6 weeks ago
by pkrumins
Thinking of Trying Linux Mint 16 Cinnemon on Old Systems 0 6 years 39 weeks ago
by Roy Schestowitz
n/a
WiFi 2 5 years 48 weeks ago
by Xarzu
5 years 48 weeks ago
by gfranken
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Create Bootable USB Using Etcher in Linux – Download and Usage Guide

Etcher is a utility created by Balena, that makes your life easy with its unique take on creating bootable USB and SD cards with a .iso file. In this guide, I will show you the steps to download and install Etcher. Although it is a bit trivial for some, may be difficult for others. Hence this guide. Read more

How to use KDE's productivity suite, Kontact

In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 6 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021. In the long, long ago, when compiling a kernel was the only way to get wifi drivers, a graphical environment was mainly for running a web browser and opening lots of terminal windows. The look and feel was a mishmash of whatever toolkit the author of the program chose to use. And then, in 1996 Matthias Ettrich proposed and later released the first version of KDE. It was based on the then proprietary Qt toolkit (since made Free and Open Source). This release sparked what can only be called a desktop revolution on Linux, with the creation of the GNOME Desktop using the at-that-time FOSS GTK Toolkit. Between KDE and GNOME, Linux went from a only computer people use Linux operating system to a robust desktop environment for everyone. Read more

Celebrating the FSF’s 35th anniversary: Stories from the Licensing and Compliance Lab

Since 2001, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) Licensing and Compliance Lab has provided the legal muscle to defend free software, and has supported software users, programmers, legal professionals, and activists who want their software to remain free. FSF representatives had done copyleft enforcement before this, but the founding of the Lab was a big step toward formalizing and organizing this work. You may have already read licensing and compliance manager Donald Robertson’s comprehensive accounting of the current functions of the team, but today, following our thirty-fifth anniversary celebration, we’re taking a look back at the role this team has played over the course of the FSF’s thirty-five year-long history, and some milestones along the way. Like the other accounts written for this series, which focused on the campaigns team and the tech team's histories, this is far from a complete story of the FSF’s licensing work: there are important milestones that we were barely able to touch upon, and important people involved whose stories and voices aren’t represented here. It’s also possible that some details may have been missed or lost to time. Read more

Meet the New Linux Distro Inspired by the iPad

I’ve seen a tonne of Linux distros come and go in the 12 years I’ve been blogging about Ubuntu, but precious few have been designed exclusively for tablet use. So when I came across JingOS, a new Ubuntu-based distro touting a touch-centric UI, I was naturally intrigued. Tablet-based Linux distros aren’t exactly common. JingOS’s developers say it is “the world’s first iPadOS-style Linux distro”. I don’t imagine anyone is going to take issue with that statement, especially once they’ve seen how it looks! Read more