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Linux 101

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WiFi 2 4 years 35 weeks ago
by Xarzu
4 years 34 weeks ago
by gfranken
Thinking of Trying Linux Mint 16 Cinnemon on Old Systems 0 5 years 26 weeks ago
by Roy Schestowitz
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Linux Cheat sheets I have made 2 11 years 36 weeks ago
by pkrumins
10 years 45 weeks ago
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Distro Magic 2 12 years 46 weeks ago
by jdriller
12 years 43 weeks ago
by pharman
Mutiple Boot 1 13 years 18 weeks ago
by leamon
13 years 18 weeks ago
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More in Tux Machines

Coffee Lake embedded PC has six USB 3.0 ports and GbE with BMC

Trenton Systems is prepping a compact, Linux-friendly “Ion Mini PC” with 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake options and up to 32GB DDR4, SATA, DP, 6x USB 3.0, and 3x GbE, including one BMC-linked port for out-of-band, remote management. Trenton Systems has released a photo and preliminary documentation for an Ion Mini PC due to begin sampling by the end of the month. Although this Mini-ITX-based, 178 x 173 x 36mm system is a bit larger than what we typically consider to be a mini-PC these days, it packs in a lot of features including 6x USB 3.0 ports and a Gigabit Ethernet port linked to a Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) chip for remote, out-of-band management of networking connections. Read more

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Today in Techrights

Linux Kernel 5.2 Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Upgrade to Linux Kernel 5.3

Released in early July 2019, the Linux 5.2 kernel series brought various new features and enhancements, among which we can mention an open-source firmware to support DSP audio devices, support for case-insensitive names in the EXT4 file system, a new file system mount API, better resource monitoring for Android devices, as well as new open-source GPU drivers for ARM Mali devices. Additionally, Linux kernel 5.2 introduced some performance improvements to the BFQ I/O scheduler, a new CPU bug infrastructure that better protects your computers against the recently disclosed Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) hardware vulnerabilities, and a new device mapper "dust" target for simulating devices with failing sectors and read failures. Read more