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ah-ha! That's why Korora

Filed under
Linux

When Kororaa changed their name to Korora I wondered why? But today I think I've spotted the real reason.

My thoughts after nearly a week with KDE 4.10

I'm switching to KDE from Gnome 3 for a Month.. This is nearly a week..

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Linux Desktops KDE 4 vs Unity vs Gnome 3 in the real world.

If you’ve chosen one of the major Linux distributions chances are (unless you’re a Mint user) you’ve come across the three big Linux Gui’s KDE, Gnome 3 and Unity.

The problem with any post like this is it’s an opinion piece, and with out a shadow of a doubt my opinion is probably going to vastly different to a lot of people out there. Linux users can be ferociously protective of not just their choice of distro, but their choice of Desktop as well.

Read more

TM Donation Drive

Filed under
Site News

We haven't had a donation drive since 2011 and now is a good time. As some of you know, I recently lost one of my gigs and I've yet to replace that income. After a protracted illness, I'm feeling much better these days and have tried to ramp up my work around here. If you'd like to help keep TM coming to you, please see my donation page for details how to help.

Time for a discreet OSX feature to come over to Linux.

Filed under
Linux

There is functionality in OSX called Airdrop which Linux Desktops could do with as a replacement of the SMB/NFS shared files sharing system. There are some options out with but they are seemingly stale projects which however can provide the functionality which is needed in Linux

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The question is, Which OS is the best? The replies were interesting.

Filed under
Linux

asking this very simple question which is the best Operating system in some corners of the Internet, is like throwing a slab of raw meat into a wild animal enclosure and watching as the question gets ripped apart. Its tantamount to asking which religion or political system is the best in the way some will tear strips off others

The rest here...

Is OpenSuse a viable Ubuntu alternative?

Filed under
Linux

There’s lots of forums and even 3 or 4 releases in I still hear people talking about how much they dislike Unity, which is a shame because it’s turning into quite a nice Gui from where i’m sitting, however one thing Linux has is choice. If nothing else there are other solid, stable distributions out there which offer a user a good solid alternative. Once such example is maybe OpenSUSE.

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Getting any distro to work on an Acer S3 feels like its 2002 again..

I've been having a problem all week stopping some insane screen tearing on an Acer Aspire S3, I've got to a point where its better, usable, but not perfect, so i've posted what I've done and it might help someone else.

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Nettop, the command not the hardware is not just for OSX..

Filed under
Linux

I found this article on the osxdaily website, the article refers to running nettop on OSX however it’s a *nix command so will also be in the package repository (if not preinstalled) on your favorite distro. I’ve tested all of the command options on Sabayon and they work fine..

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Using dual factor authentication on Linux..

Filed under
Linux

I’m really starting to appreciate the benifits of dual factor authentication across the board, so this Howtoforge article is of interest to anyone who wants to secure SSH access on thier Linux systems. I previously posted about using your mobile phone as the something you have bit, well this is another method.

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HOW TO DO MASS ENROLLING OF YUBIKEY WITH LINOTP

Filed under
Linux

While you may have your Ubuntu install locked down with Full disk encryption incase you loose the laptop, UFW locking down the network with a firewall, there is no point if you have a poor password. Dual factor authentication using One Time Passwords may be an option for you, if they are this great howtoforge article might point you in the right direction.

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Why is PRISM so shocking? Everyone is reading our data

Filed under
Just talk

With prism being the story of the week, I'm just asking a simple question

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Half-Life

Filed under
Linux

I've been playing Half-Life recently, something to which I've looked forward for quite some time. I did get it playing under Wine years ago, but I thought I only got a little ways. I'm stuck In the Rails right now, but I remember this level.

Setting up a serial console

This is a bit old school however if you are a Sysadmin you might need to get a console up for a Cisco or other device. I hope this helps

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Getting Squid3 on Debian 6.x to work with Active Directory, Security Groups and Websense

Filed under
Linux

I’ve had a need to get a local squid proxy to perform local filtering based on AD Security groups because it’s not something websense can do. I found this wonderful howtofoge guide online and Used it to setup the base system. This howto is a work in progress as the next stage is to get it working with DansGuardian or SquidGuard.

Prerequisites
Client Internet Explorer Browsers need to have “Enable Integrated Windows Authentication” ticked in Internet Options :: Advanced settings as well as Proxy Auto detection enabled – google these if not sure. All modern web browsers will support proxy auto detection. Firefox and Chrome also support Windows Authentication.

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Enabling Dual Factor Authentication on Linux SSH logins..

Filed under
Linux

A couple of weeks ago I wrote a post on using a Chromebook to develop on a cloud platform. Its based on a Digital Ocean remote server and like most people who wish to attach to the command line interface on a remote server I use SSH. It’s an encrypted connection over the network/internet from end to end. However being a cloud server I was wondering if it was possible to secure this a little bit more?

A chat with a friend on the way into work provided me with a solution.

The solution is Two Factor authentication a system beased on a simple premise, something you know (the SSH password in this case) and something you have (your mobile phone in this case, but it could be a secure token) which will deliver a random number.

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Ubuntu 13.04 raring to go on Acer C7 Chromebook

Filed under
Linux

Most of the guides you will see using this utility mine included cover how to get Ubuntu 12.04 the LTS version working, however there is also scope within the command line to get the latest and greatest up and running. specifically the -r switch. Issuing the following command will provide you with a bare bones Ubuntu 13.04 install

Read How

Using a Chromebook to develop in the cloud…

Filed under
Linux

Being a few months in with my Acer C7 Chromebook as my only laptop i’ve very pleased with what it does, I do have the Crouton Ubuntu chroot installed and upgraded the device to 16Gb of Ram, however there is one core thing I miss with this setup. VMWare/Virtualbox. I find i’m often building virtual machines, usually Ubuntu to test bsh scripts or build LAMP Environments to test some PHP out with. That isn’t something i’m able to do even on the CHROOT Ubuntu environment.

All however is not lost, and i’ve found a way to get round this..

Read my ChromeOS virtual soluton

Desktop era

Filed under
Linux

Will the believers in the desktops ever stop making this year is the year of Linux on the desktop...

There’s something Ubuntu needs to do if the phone is going to work..

Filed under
Linux

They say a week in politics is a long time, well a year in the mobile phone industry is an eternity and what huge changes the industry is going through. A year ago the roost was ruled by Apple and Google, 3G was the fastest we can go and handsets were finding a stock size at 4.5″.. The world however of the mobile device is now a very different place and very much in a positive state of change..

What does the Ubuntu Phone need to succeed?

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Docs Translations FAD Report, KDE Applications 19.04 in Flathub and Fedora 30 Upgrade Test Day

  • Fedora Docs Translations FAD Report
    Last week Jean-Baptiste Holcroft and Adam Šamalík met in Strasbourg for Docs Translations mini-FAD in order to prototype translations support for the Fedora Docs website. And we did a lot of work! This post is a report from the event, a status report, and a brief plan for how to move forward. Our goal was to make sure we’re both on the same page about how it’s all going to work, to do some coding and publish a functional prototype, and to write a set of requirements for a potential production deployment.
  • [Some] KDE Applications 19.04 also available in flathub
    The KDE Applications 19.04 release announcement (read it if you haven't, it's very complete) mentions some of the applications are available at the snap store, but forgets to mention flathub.
  • Fedora Community Blog: Fedora 30 Upgrade Test Day 2019-04-26
    Friday, 2019-04-26, is the Fedora 30 Upgrade Test Day! As part of this planned change for Fedora 30, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

Security: Curl, Two Factor Authentication (2FA) and Hacking With Kali Linux

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl + hackerone = TRUE
    There seems to be no end to updated posts about bug bounties in the curl project these days. Not long ago I mentioned the then new program that sadly enough was cancelled only a few months after its birth. Now we are back with a new and refreshed bug bounty program! The curl bug bounty program reborn.
  • Liz Fong-Jones on how to secure SSH with Two Factor Authentication (2FA)
    Liz mentions that by adding passphrase encryption, the private keys become resistant to theft when at rest. However, when they are in use, the usability challenges of re-entering the passphrase on every connection means that “engineers began caching keys unencrypted in memory of their workstations, and worse yet, forwarding the agent to allow remote hosts to use the cached keys without further confirmation”. The Matrix breach, which took place on April 11 showcases an example of what happens when authenticated sessions are allowed to propagate without a middle-man. The intruder in the Matrix breach had access to the production databases, potentially giving them access to unencrypted message data, password hashes, and access tokens.
  • Hacking With Kali Linux
    Before I talk about the series that I am going to start, let us briefly talk about who should follow this series. I know there are so many people out there who are very curious to learn hacking just to hack their partner's social media account. Well, if you are such a person, please listen to me. Hacking is not about getting into somebody's personal life and steal their information. It is illegal. Somebody well said - “We need to have a talk on the subject of what's yours and what's mine.” So you should not hack information that is not yours. ​But if you are a tech enthusiast who wants to make a career as a penetration tester or white hat hacker, this series can be really a good way to start. So for such enthusiasts, I am creating a page where you can follow the series. You can also follow our social media pages so you get a notification when a new informative article comes out.

Mozilla: VoxelJS, AiC and Mozilla B-Team

  • Mozilla VR Blog: VoxelJS: Chunking Magic
    A couple of weeks ago I relaunched VoxelJS with modern ThreeJS and modules support. Today I'm going to talk a little bit about how VoxelJS works internally, specifically how voxels are represented and drawn. This is the key magic part of a voxel engine and I owe a tremendous debt to Max Ogden, James Halliday and Mikola Lysenko Voxels are represented by numbers in a large three dimensional array. Each number says what type of block goes in that block slot, with 0 representing empty. The challenge is how to represent a potentially infinite set of voxels without slowing the computer to a crawl. The only way to do this is to load just a portion of the world at a time.
  • AiC: Collaborative summary documents
    One of my goals was that we could, at least for a moment, disconnect people from their particular position and turn their attention towards the goal of achieving a shared and complete summary. I didn’t feel that we were very succesful in this goal. For one thing, most participants simply left comments on parts they disagreed with; they didn’t themselves suggest alternate wording. That meant that I personally had to take their complaint and try to find some “middle ground” that accommodated the concern but preserved the original point. This was stressful for me and a lot of work. More importantly, it meant that most people continued to interact with the document as advocates for their point-of-view, rather than trying to step back and advocate for the completeness of the summary. In other words: when you see a sentence you disagree with, it is easy to say that you disagree with it. It is much harder to rephrase it in a way that you do agree with – but which still preserves (what you believe to be) the original intent. Doing so requires you to think about what the other person likely meant, and how you can preserve that. However, one possible reason that people may have been reluctant to offer suggestions is that, often, it was hard to make “small edits” that addressed people’s concerns. Especially early on, I found that, in order to address some comment, I would have to make larger restructurings. For example, taking a small sentence and expanding it to a bullet point of its own. Finally, some people who were active on the thread didn’t participate in the doc. Or, if they did, they did so by leaving comments on the original GitHub thread. This is not surprising: I was asking people to do something new and unfamiliar. Also, this whole process played out relatively quickly, and I suspect some people just didn’t even see the document before it was done. If I were to do this again, I would want to start it earlier in the process. I would also want to consider synchronous meetings, where we could go try to process edits as a group (but I think it would take some thought to figure out how to run such a meeting). In terms of functioning asynchronously, I would probably change to use a Google Doc instead of a Dropbox Paper. Google Docs have a better workflow for suggesting edits, I believe, as well, as a richer permissions model. Finally, I would try to draw a harder line in trying to get people to “own” the document and suggest edits of their own. I think the challenge of trying to neutrally represent someone else’s point of view is pretty powerful.
  • Mozilla B-Team: happy bmo push day!
    Bugfixes + enabling the new security feature for API keys.

Programming Leftovers