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Using a Chromebook to develop in the cloud…

Filed under
Linux

Being a few months in with my Acer C7 Chromebook as my only laptop i’ve very pleased with what it does, I do have the Crouton Ubuntu chroot installed and upgraded the device to 16Gb of Ram, however there is one core thing I miss with this setup. VMWare/Virtualbox. I find i’m often building virtual machines, usually Ubuntu to test bsh scripts or build LAMP Environments to test some PHP out with. That isn’t something i’m able to do even on the CHROOT Ubuntu environment.

All however is not lost, and i’ve found a way to get round this..

Read my ChromeOS virtual soluton

Desktop era

Filed under
Linux

Will the believers in the desktops ever stop making this year is the year of Linux on the desktop...

There’s something Ubuntu needs to do if the phone is going to work..

Filed under
Linux

They say a week in politics is a long time, well a year in the mobile phone industry is an eternity and what huge changes the industry is going through. A year ago the roost was ruled by Apple and Google, 3G was the fastest we can go and handsets were finding a stock size at 4.5″.. The world however of the mobile device is now a very different place and very much in a positive state of change..

What does the Ubuntu Phone need to succeed?

Casual Programming and Linux Screen-Recorders

Filed under
Linux

After being retired (for four years) from teaching high school Computer Science, I decided to get back into programming again. I once taught a beginning programming class using the Ruby language, and I thought that would be a good way to get back into programming. So, I decided I needed a “Ruby refresher”, and I wanted to learn more about that language than I taught in the classroom.

Forgot your Ubuntu Password? All is not lost.

Filed under
Howtos

It’s always a pain when you forget your password, and i’ve often done it on an Ubuntu install. All however is not lost as a stock Ubuntu install its quite easy to reset your password

Read More

Maybe it's time to think about LTSP?

Filed under
Linux

With austerity being the watchword of our times being able to get as much out of that IT hardware you have is as important as ever, more so when the industry is in shift at an OS level and maybe the hardware you have isn’t quite up to the task of Windows 8?

Ubuntu Phone, Good idea?

Filed under
Linux

In a bold move today Ubuntu have announced plans to move forward with an Ubuntu Phone which it is touting the interface is the difference here. This is a big statement in a marketplace which has been owned by Apple and Google for the last 3 to 4 years.

The EE Nokia Lumia 920

Filed under
Just talk

The UK got its first 4G network this month and the choices for 4G phones are thin on the ground at the moment the iPhone 5 and the Samsung Galaxy S3 were there at launch however as a long time Android and IOS user i’m finding both operating systems at that stage of their life when they ar about features not innovation. This may well change in the future however, and you must understand these words are hard for me to say, Microsoft seem to be innovating quite a bit in the OS market, pushing the boat out and taking some risks.

My phone of choice on EE is the Nokia Lumia 920, Nokias last bi breath attempt at staying alive as a company it would seem however this is a phone developed for Windows Phone 8 in Microsoft. It is the phone Microsoft were happy to share the stage with at launch and it’s got generally good reviews.

Lets start this with the two important things the phone and the 4G..

Read More

Building your own cloud using OwnCloud on Ubuntu.

Filed under
Linux

Unless you’ve been under a rock or are the type of Luddite who thinks the pen and paper is modern hi tech, you cannot fail to have heard about the most miss used expression on the Internet, the cloud. It’s a buzzword which every ill equipped marketing goon has latched his crayon’s onto and will mention in every presentation ever.

Put simply the cloud is the image used when tech people wanted to display the Internet outside their own network, this turned into a location firstly where data could be stored and more recently where “Big Data” is stored.. Honestly I have no idea who comes up with this stuff.

Read More

The 3 Wise Smartphones this christmas

Filed under
Just talk

The busiest period of the year for consumer technology purchases is reaching us quickly December is Thanksgiving and Christmas and January Sales time Cash is going to be spent and the smartphone market is a huge slice of that cash which will be spent.

Following a week of announcements what state is this market segment in?

Read More

Ubuntu 12.04 the Macbook Pro Post Install

Filed under
Linux

While this post states its the post install for the Macbook Pro it will cover any 64bit Nvidia Ubuntu 12.10 post install...

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Ubuntu 12.10 on the Macbook Pro

Filed under
Linux

With Mountain Lion not cutting the mustard, it was time to see what Ubuntu 12.10 offers the Mac Community so i've just installed the MAC Spin of the 64bit Ubuntu's latest offering.

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IOS6 battery life drain adding to your woes? This might help…

Filed under
Just talk

If you have installed IOS6 and your device is draining battery like no one's business then you really need to read this, i promise it will solve your battery issues. It's not the normal notifications and location services shutdown...

Creating an AD Server for Free using Ubuntu and Samba

Filed under
Howtos

While being a huge fan of the GNU/Linux OS I do also live in the real world which means using Active Directory Domain Controllers and Windows networks. this week however I’ve had to build for a project a stand alone AD network. This got me thinking to a project I built for a school 6 uears ago which I did the same thing with Samba on Fedora.

How To Edit Grub Menu or Software On Ubuntu / Linux / Fedora Grub Customizer

Filed under
Linux

Now,
For Ubuntu
Open Terminal and type
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install grub-customizer

(Fedora 32-bit)
wget -O grub-customizer-2.5.7-i686.rpm http://goo.gl/vE2Ev
sudo yum install grub-customizer-2.5.7-i686.rpm

Don't Forget Feeds

Filed under
Site News

Even when I'm not able to update the site as much as I would like, please note the feeds Tuxmachines pulls in. In the side columns below the fold are Linux.com, LinuxToday.com, and more. On the news feed page is a wider variety.

This is where mobile technology is headed, it’s great.. Especially for "Nix

Filed under
Linux

We know the mobile phone is where it is at, we also know the cloud is the glue which binds all our devices, what if this didn’t have to be the case? The cloud is great when you are tethered to your Wifi or a mobile signal, great if you work in a big city with lots of Wifi hotspots or mobile coverage. Not so good when the office blocks access to it because of security risks, or you live in a 3G blackspot.

Exploring Strange New Worlds...

Filed under
Just talk

I've seen it discussed before, but it sometimes doesn't really hit me until I see where someone who is talking around it, completely misses it.

Of course, I'm talking about the Star Trek influence. How close are we to realizing Star Trek Technology?

Personal Computing on the fly

Filed under
Linux

The cloud. It's the talk of the town and has been growing for awhile now.

LibreOffice 3.6 is ready for us.

I know, I know, it is best to install your apps only through your Linux distribution's repository.
However, since LibreOffice 3.6 is faster loading and comes some nice new features spread throughout the Suite, this may be the time NOT to wait.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming