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This is "See Ya Around"

Filed under
Site News

I started to say "this is goodbye," but just because I sold the site doesn't mean I won't be around Linuxville. I'm still writing at ostatic and I may turn up here now and again as well. I'll be looking around to expand my writing after the new year too, so you're not rid of me yet. But the sale on tuxmachines.org has been completed.

New HTPC the Lenovo Ideastation Q190 & Ubuntu

We cut the cord a couple of years ago, the need to get TV over traditional TV Ariel was no longer needed and services such as TV Catchup, iPlayer and the other UK Catchup TV Channels streamed over the net to my TV were all we needed.

Having had an Asrock 330 Ion be the trusty device for nearly 5 years the box finally gave up the shost last week.

The options available for using the internet to provide your TV are huge, from the giants of Apple with Apple TV, Google are dipping their toes in the water they have the ChromeCast, and there are a huge bagfull of Android Devices which all claim to plug into the HDMI port of your TV.. Then there is the Raspberry PI which has a custom build of OS's to provide different interfaces.

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Sold! (tentatively)

Filed under
Site News

I guess tuxmachines.org has been sold for $1000. I know it's kinda low, but times have changed and the new owner plans to carry on the tuxmachines tradition.

going twice

Filed under
Site News

going twice

fair warning - going once....

Filed under
Site News

Well, I think I'm going to accept one of the two $1000 bids received, unless anyone else wants to bid...

Tuxmachines.org for sale (update)

Filed under
Site News

I've decided to try and see if anyone might be interested in buying and doing something with my domain and site. So, today, I'm posting this ad here: tuxmachines.org for sale.


Update: I've received some bids and will decide by Monday....

Why is Security not Turned on by Default?

Filed under
Just talk

This isn't a Windows thing, Linux as well should be more secure than the assumption that the OS with elevated privileges is secure enough, there is so much more Desktop Linux could be doing to make the users experience more secure.

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Sometimes the Tech pres just gets it wrong..

Filed under
Just talk

While I know this is a Linux site, i feel that Windows RT is getting the same bad rap Linux gets from the Tech press in many areas. A lack of true understanding of just what they are dealing with or just a huge need to present some form of being part of the crowd. I'm not sure just what it is however it needs to change. It's the same thing that happens when some people review Ubuntu PHone for example and claim it's not a viable platform.. and it annoys me..

Why Everything you've read in the tech press about Windows RT is WRONG!!

sorry so slow

Filed under
Site News

Sorry I've slowed down on gathering the interesting news lately. I think my blood pressure is back up or something. I'm trying to get a dr appointment. But I'm trying to get back up to speed. Thanks for your patience.

blogstop javascript

Filed under
Site News

Man, I hate those blogspot blogs that require javascript (or something) to display the basic text of the article they wish linked to. Sometimes I just close konqueror and don't.

SOL

Filed under
Linux

Wonder how many journalists are waiting for the SOL to fail so they can use the headline "SOL is Shit Out of Luck?" (Not /me/ of course, but I do smell a poll question in there somewhere).

Del is ambiguous

Filed under
Linux

New KDE 4.10.5 is more like Windows than ever. Fresh new warning says "The key sequence 'Del' is ambiguous. Use 'Configure Shortcuts' from the 'Settings' menu to solve the ambiguity. No action will be triggered." Great, after 14 years of using KDE and the Del key to delete unwanted mail, all of a sudden said Del key is ambiguious. What's ambiguious about Del? Del means delete. No means no....

Head to head the best of class, the Lumia 920 and the Nexus 4

Filed under
Just talk

With the tenuous link of Linux/android I take a look at just how googles flagship device stands up against the top WP8 phone

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Big Thank You to All

Filed under
Site News

Despite the economy and my decreased traffic, I'd say the donation drive was a success. I saw a lot of familiar names of those who had given before as well as some new ones. Ad revenue was up as well.

Softpedia

Filed under
Site News

Linking to Softpedia.com articles has always presented a bit of a moral dilemma. They cover things that others don't or many times identify an angle no one else has. I like their little news blurbs. But I don't like that they link to downloads on their own server instead of the source.

OpenSUSE from an Ubuntu users point of view..

Filed under
Reviews

I'm not a huge fan of VS posts, you know, Linux Mint VS Fedora.. I'm a Linux user, and i've recently migrated from Ubuntu to OpenSuse to see what the other side of the fence is likem what's done different, what is good, what is not so good. I've put together a few observations

Please, have a read

TM Donation Drive, Updates

Filed under
Site News

Our donation drive has been going well and we thank all so much, as we do those that allowed ads for my site. But it seems to be winding down, pledges have seemed to have stopped. I'll leave up the reminder up a few more days maybe, but then we'll conclude the 2013 Donation Drive. Report and formal thank you to follow. Please see the donation page if you'd like to help.

Fixing OpenSuse’s Dog Awful default fonts…

Filed under
Howtos

Lets not beat around the bush here, the default font rendering in OpenSuse and the default font do not an OS fit for reading make.. this can be fixed however..

Love or hate Ubuntu, out of the box it has one of the best font rendering setups of any distro and considering how much time we spend on our PC’s setting your fonts up correctly is one less headach, literally.

I’m not sure how much of these instructions I got right, however after a reboot the screen text does at least look better..

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Stopping Screen Flickering on Ivy Bridge Laptops using Linux

Filed under
Howtos

This is a solution to a problem which has been dogging me on every version of Linux I install on the Acer Aspire S3. I'm hoping it will help someone.

Read my solution

I'm running Mint

Filed under
Linux

I needed a fresh install on a safe partition today and thought I'd try Korora 19, but alas, I've ended up using Mint 15 KDE (rc). So, far so good...

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary
    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here. 2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.
  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)
    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).
  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel
    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree. Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

today's howtos and programming

Fedora 30 Workstation review - Smarter, faster and buggier

Fedora 30 is definitely one of the more interesting releases of this family in a long-time. It brings significant changes, including solid improvements in the desktop performance and responsiveness. Over the years, Fedora went from no proprietary stuff whatsoever to slowly acknowledging the modern needs of computing, so now it gives you MP3 codecs and you can install graphics drivers and such. Reasonable looks, plus good functionality across the board. However, there were tons of issues, too. Printing to Samba, video screenshot bug, installer cropped-image slides, package management complications, mouse cursor lag, oopses, average battery life, and inadequate usability out of the box. You need to change the defaults to have a desktop that can be used in a quick, efficient way without remembering a dozen nerdy keyboard shortcuts. All in all, I like the freshness. In general, it would seem the Linux desktop is seeing a cautious revival, and Fedora's definitely a happy player. But there are too many rough edges. Well, we got performance tweaks after so many years, and codecs, we might get window buttons and desktop icons one day back, too. Something like 6/10, and definitely worth exploring. I am happy enough to do two more tests. I will run an in-vivo upgrade on the F29 instance on this same box, and then also test the distro on an old Nvidia-powered laptop, which will showcase both the support for proprietary graphics (didn't work the last time) and performance improvements, if they scale for old hardware, too. That's all for now. Read more

Events: Automotive at LF, Linux Clusters Institute, Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan Keynote Speakers and Schedule Announced
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source has announced the speaker line up for Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit. One registration provides access to all content at both events, which will be held July 17-19 at the Toranomon Hills Forum in Tokyo. Open Source Summit Japan (OSSJ) and Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) will bring together top talent from companies on the leading edge of innovation including Toyota Motor Corporation, Uber, Intel, Sony, Google, Microsoft and more. Talks will cover a range of topics, with ALS talks on everything from infrastructure and hardware to compliance and security; and OSSJ sessions on AI, Linux systems, cloud infrastructure, cloud native applications, open networking, edge computing, safety and security and open source best practices.
  • Register Now for the 2019 Introductory Linux Clusters Institute Workshop
    Registration is now open for the 2019 Linux Clusters Institute (LCI) Introductory Workshop,which will be held August 19-23, 2019 at the Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. This workshop will cover the fundamentals of setting up and administering a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster and will be led by leading HPC experts.
  • Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019
    The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing “sold out” recently because the cap on early bird registrations was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year’s conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.