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Blogs

under the weather

Filed under
Site News

You may have noticed the lack of updates to the site past few days, and along with my apologies comes the explanation that I've been very ill.

Texas Mint Tea, anyone?

What if … a new Texas-Irish distro could rise from joining forces of the current number three and number six distro "factories?"

Debian-Main Locus(t) Error

from XKCD 24-09-2010

Smile

echo "Hello World"

Filed under
Just talk

Hello,
My name is Justin Breithaupt the maker of JULinux...

Virtualization

Filed under
Linux

In my last post, i introduced some of us to the world of Linux, the advantages it offers and the status it confers.

Understandably, it is still a Microsoft world, so i wouldn’t expect you to just clean out your Windows operating system and install Linux. If you do that, trust me, you will definitely have issues, truck loads.

Amnesia: TDD Ready

Filed under
Linux

Although I've not seen an official announcement yet, Amnesia: The Dark Descent is ready to download - at least for pre-orders.

under the weather

Filed under
Site News

If any have been wondering why things might seem a bit slow around here lately, it's because I haven't been feeling well. Hopefully things should be getting back to normal in the next coupla days. Thanks for your patience.

X Window System

Filed under
Linux

The X Window System (www.x.org) was created in 1984 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) by researchers working on a distributed computing project and a campuswide distributed environment, called Project Athena. This system was not the first windowing software to run on a UNIX system, but it was the first to become widely available and accepted. In 1985, MIT released X (version 9) to the public, for use without a license. Three years later, a group of vendors formed the X Consortium to support the continued development of X, under the leadership of MIT. By 1998, the X Consortium had become part of the Open Group. In 2001, the Open Group released X version 11, release 6.6 (X11R6.6).

Cloud computing on Linux can help small business

Big companies like RedHat are getting into Software as a Service, otherwise known as "cloud computing".

5 most interesting linux commands

Filed under
Linux

5 most interesting linux commands to try out.

Make your own linux operating system with archlinux

Filed under
Linux

Arch Linux is a highly customizable Linux Distro which is easy to setup and use . Arch Linux is mainly meant for persons with the mentality ” Do it ourselves ” . I was also one of them who tried to install Arch Linux in my computer and atlast succeded in installing this highly customized Linux distribution .

All hail the easy to use!

Filed under
Linux

I've run Linux since before the turn of the century. I know Linux. I love the commandline. But after 10 years of fiddling, I've come to realize one significant thing.

Big Thank You to Contributors

Filed under
Site News

I want to formally thank all those who contributed to the Tuxmachines' fund raiser this past 24 hours. The response has been heart warming to say the least.

Linux Failed to Satisfy Old PC Users

Filed under
Linux

Some months ago, i wrote article “3 Reasons why we shouldn’t use Linux“, after a lot of comments on the article in the favor of Linux, I thought i should also try Linux. So i downloaded Fedora 13.

More Iron for your blood...

Browse more privately with Chrome.

From Karmic to Lucid: Distribution Update Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

In line with its newbie-friendly tradition of providing a way to do everything via a graphical user interface, Ubuntu provides a way to do a distribution upgrade by clicking a button at the top of the Update Manager. Since version 10.04 was released on April 29, it was once again time to see how well the upgrade went. Here are screenshots of the entire process.

Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Finally Released!

Filed under
News

Despite being declared for re-spin of the ISO for last minute bugs fix, the latest Ubuntu, 10.04 LTS (Lucid Lynx) has been finally released an hour ago.

Link Here: http://tinytux.blogspot.com/2010/04/ubuntu-1004-lts-finally-released.html

Freshly Squeezed Debian: Installing from Live DVD

Filed under
Reviews

Last month, the Debian Live Project released live CD and DVD images of the next version of Debian, codenamed "Squeeze." They included an installer that uses the live filesystem rather than packages, so it has the advantages of being fast and allowing you to preview on the live media, what you eventually get on your hard drive. This may not seem like a big deal, since most modern Linux distributions use this installation method, but it's still fairly new for Debian. I downloaded and installed the 64-bit GNOME version.

Open Source model for Drug Discovery (OSDD)

Filed under
News

Secret Future Ubuntu User Interface Plans Revealed!

Filed under
Humor

Mark Shuttleworth recently said that "moving everything to the left opens up the space on the right nicely." But what "innovative options" might he be referring to? To find out, we contacted a member of Ubuntu's design team, Drew A. Gooey-Aubergine, who gave us an exclusive look at what innovative new features Ubuntu users might see on the right-hand side of their windows in future releases.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 16.10 Doesn't Change Much With Performance, Clear Linux Still Leads In Most Tests

Given yesterday's Ubuntu 16.10 final beta release ahead of the official "Yakkety Yak" debut in two weeks, I decided to run some benchmarks of Ubuntu 16.10 compared to Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS on the same system plus also throwing in the Intel Clear Linux distribution given it tends to be one of the most performant. For those that haven't yet tried out Ubuntu 16.10 nor followed its development, GCC 6.2 is now the default compiler in place of GCC 5.4 from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Mesa 12.0.3 provides the stock graphics drivers and Linux 4.8 is the stock kernel. Read more Also: DDR4 Memory Speed Tests With The Core i7 6800K On Ubuntu Linux

Mozilla's Rust 1.12

  • Announcing Rust 1.12
    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.12. Rust is a systems programming language with the slogan “fast, reliable, productive: pick three.” As always, you can install Rust 1.12 from the appropriate page on our website, and check out the detailed release notes for 1.12 on GitHub. 1361 patches were landed in this release.
  • Rust 1.12 Programming Language Released
    Rust 1.12 has been released as the newest version of this popular programming language with a focus on "fast, reliable, productive: pick three."

Linux Devices

  • Raspberry Pi Foundation Unveils New LXDE-Based Desktop for Raspbian Called PIXEL
    Today, September 28, 2016, Raspberry Pi Foundation's Simon Long proudly unveiled a new desktop environment for the Debian-based Raspbian GNU/Linux operating system for Raspberry Pi devices. Until today, Raspbian shiped with the well-known and lightweight LXDE desktop environment, which looks pretty much the same as on any other Linux-based distribution out there that is built around LXDE (Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment). But Simon Long, a UX engineer working for Raspberry Pi Foundation was hired to make it better, transform it into something that's more appealing to users.
  • MintBox Mini updated with faster AMD SoC and 8GB RAM
    CompuLab’s Linux Mint flavored MintBox Mini Pro mini-PC updates the Mini with an AMD A10 Micro-6700T, plus BT 4.0, mini-PCIe, and twice the RAM and storage. The CompuLab built, $395 MintBox Mini Pro, which ships with the Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon distribution, updates the $295 MintBox Mini with a lot more performance and features in the same compact 108 x 83 x 24mm footprint. That’s considerably smaller than earlier collaborations between CompuLab and the Linux Mint project, such as the circa-2013 MintBox 2.
  • Mintbox Mini Pro
    MintBox Mini Pro The new model is called “Mintbox Mini Pro”, it’s just as small as the original Mintbox Mini but with much better specifications.

4 of the Best Linux Distros for Windows Users

For the past year Microsoft has offered free upgrades to their latest operating system, Windows 10. This was mainly due to the fact that Windows 8 and 8.1 were poorly received, especially when compared to Windows 7. Unfortunately the free upgrade period has passed, so if you want to give Windows 10 a try, you’ll have to dig into your wallet to do it. If your faith in the tech giant has waned over the years, you’re not alone. The latest versions of Windows have all been heavily criticized, proving that they have been a far cry from the world dominance of Windows XP. If you’re one of the many people turned off by the latest iterations of Windows, the jump to Linux might look very appealing. Unfortunately, a new OS often comes with a steep learning curve. Windows, with the exception of the fumble that was 8, has more or less looked and behaved the same for years. Having to re-learn everything can be a daunting task, one that could pressure you into staying with Windows forever. However, you do have options. There are many different distributions of Linux out there, with some aiming to replicate the look and feel of Windows. The goal of this is to make transitioning relatively painless. With Linux boasting improved hardware support, long term stability and a wider range of software applications, there is no better time to try it out! Read more Related (Microsoft exodus): Microsoft Applications and Services chief Qi Lu leaves the company<