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How to custmize KDE’s window titlebar buttons

Filed under
Linux

If you are using the latest KDE edition of your favorite distribution, your window titlebar could be missing a button or two that you most certainly need. That is definitely the case on Sabayon 9 KDE. The titlebar could also be sporting spacers that you do not need, as is the case on Kubuntu 12.04.

KLook gets PDF/ODT support, while StackFolder gets drag-n-drop

Filed under
Linux

KLook is a multi-file-type viewer. It is not an application that can be started standalone, but is integrated into other applications, like Dolphin, KDE’s file manager. StackFolder, on the other hand, is a widget application that makes it possible to browse the contents of a directory, or your entire home folder, without opening Dolphin.

Downloads of Apache OpenOffice 3.4.0 top 5 million

If you just dropped in from outer space, Apache OpenOffice, or what used to be called OpenOffice.org, was a Sun Microsystems-sponsored project. It was at one time, the most popular office suite, as it was pre-installed on almost all Linux and BSD desktop distributions.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/downloads-of-apache-openoffice-3-4-0-top-5-million/

How to make Fedora 17 more user-friendly with easyLife

Filed under
Linux

But there are applications that make it very easy to install most non-free applications on any edition of Fedora. One of those applications is called EasyLife. This article shows the simple steps you need to install it on your Fedora 17-powered box.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/how-to-make-fedora-17-more-user-friendly-with-easylife/

Zorin OS 6 Core preview

Filed under
Linux

Zorin OS is one of those distributions that attempt to bring something different to the Linux desktop. But what exactly does Zorin OS bring to the table? An Ubuntu-based distribution with a Microsoft Windows 7 theme. The objective is to make it easier for Windows users to switch to Linux.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/zorin-os-6-core-preview/

Mandriva 2012 technical preview

Filed under
Linux

The installer in this technical preview gives you the option to install a KDE desktop (default), a GNOME 3 desktop, LXDE and Other desktop. I hoped to show screen shots from test installations of supported desktop environments, but the GNOME 3 installation was too buggy to use. As a result, only screen shots from the KDE, LXDE and Other desktops are featured.

Fedora 17 KDE review

Filed under
Linux

For the main edition and for each Spin, there are installation images for 32- and 64-bit architectures. This article presents a review of the KDE Spin, using a 32-bit installation image on real hardware and in a virtual environment.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com

Sabayon 9 KDE and GNOME preview

Filed under
Linux

Sabayon is a rolling-release distribution, so existing users do not have to reinstall to get the latest core and applications of a Sabayon release. That is one of the best features of the distribution.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/12/sabayon-9-kde-and-gnome-preview/

Linux Mint 13 MATE/Cinnamon review

Filed under
Linux

Both desktop environments aim to satisfy users who refuse to let go of old technology and those who demand new technology, but packaged in a familiar format. And Linux Mint is the first project to make both available to users in separate ISO installation images for 32- and 64-bit architectures.

This article is a review of both editions.

How to dual-boot Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon/MATE and Windows 7

Filed under
Linux

This tutorial presents a step-by-step guide on how to dual-boot either one with Windows 7 on a computer with a single hard drive. Because the Cinnamon and MATE editions of Linux Mint 13 share the same installation program, the steps involved are the same regardless of the edition you use.

2 cool features to expect in KDE 4.9

Filed under
Linux

The list of planned features is very long and includes many UX and UI additions, improvements and bugfixes, but the two that I am looking forward to the most are KLook and StackFolder, two features already available by default on ROSA Marathon 2012 and also in ROSA Desktop 2012 beta.

How to change the height and position of the KDE panel

Filed under
Linux

To change the properties of the panel, which by default is on the bottom edge of the desktop, you need to access the Panel Tool Box widget located on the extreme right edge of the panel. Depending on the distribution you are using, the panel could be locked or unlocked.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/05/how-to-change-the-height-and-position-of-the-kde-panel/

Mageia 2 review

Filed under
Linux

The other desktop environments and window managers supported by Mageia 2 are E17, LXDE, WindowMaker and IceWM. Aside from the Live CD installation images for KDE and GNOME 3, users are offered dual-architecture CD installation images, DVD, and network-based CD ISO installation images for 32- and 64-bit architectures.

MATE vs Cinnamon

Filed under
Linux

The aim of this article is not to present a point-by-point comparison of the two desktop environments, but to present a general overview, so a new user has a top-level idea of what they are.

Piwik 1.8 released

Filed under
News

It is an alternative to Google Analytics and from my experience, better in many respects. The latest version, released just today June 1 2012, is Piwik 1.8, and it comes with its share of new and improved features and bugfixes.

This release is rated critical, so if you are running Piwik 1.7.1, the previous stable version, immediate upgrade is highly recommended.

Install Cinnamon 1.4 on Fedora 17

Filed under
Linux

For those set of users, suitable alternatives are: Modify the interface with extensions, as I showed how to do here, or install Cinnamon desktop, a project from the developers of Linux Mint. Cinnamon appeals to many because it offers the familiar look and feel of the type of desktop environment they are used to.

Fedora 17 KDE and GNOME 3 preview

Filed under
Linux

Specialized Spins for Security, Scientific-KDE, Design-suite, SoaS, Games, Electronic-lab and Robotics were also released. It is very unlikely that I will review these, but there will be reviews of the main edition and KDE Spin. While the reviews are still being baked, here are a few screen shots from test installations of the main edition and KDE Spin for your viewing pleasure.

How to get back that friendly desktop look on Mageia 2 GNOME 3

Filed under
Linux

From my perspective, the worst culprit is GNOME 3. And though I have often criticised the default GNOME 3 interface, with a little bit of tweaking here and there, I have been able to get it to a point where I can actually use it for my daily computing tasks. It is not perfect, but much better than the default configuration.

Panel-Docklet: A must-install extension for GNOME 3

Consequently, I have not even bothered to install a distribution running GNOME 3 in its default state on a “production” boxen, other than for review purposes only. But while preparing a review of Mageia 2, I came across an extension that could just make me a believer and user of GNOME 3.

Read the full article at

Linux Mint 13 MATE/Cinnamon preview

Filed under
Linux

There is Linux Mint 13 MATE, which features MATE, a desktop environment forked from GNOME 2, and Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon, which features Cinnamon, a desktop environment built atop GNOME 3. So, Linux Mint joins a growing list of Linux distributions that do not ship an edition running the GNOME 3 desktop in its default state.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel: Greg Kroah-Hartman's Talk and Panics

  • Greg Kroah-Hartman: Lessons for Developers from 20 Years of Linux Kernel Work [Ed: "The Linux Foundation is a sponsor of The New Stack" for the latter to write puff pieces such as these, so it's basically marketing]
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman: 'Don't Make Users Mad'

    Kroah-Hartman explains that one of Linus Torvalds' most deeply-held convictions: don't break userspace. "Other operating systems have this rule as well — it's a very solid rule — because we always want you to upgrade. And we want you to upgrade without worrying about it. We don't want you to feel scared. If you see a new release, and we say, 'Hey, this fixes a bunch of problems,' we don't want you to feel worried about taking that. That's really really important — especially with security...." If you do make a change, make sure there truly is a compelling reason. "You have to provide enough reason and enough goodness to force somebody to take the time to learn to do something else. That's very rare." His example of this was systemd, which unified a variety of service configurations and initialization processes. "They did it right. They provided all the functionality, they solved a real problem that was there. They unified all these existing tools and problems in such a way that it was just so much better to use, and it provided enough impetus that everybody was willing to do the work to modify their own stuff and move to the new model. It worked. People still complain about it, but it worked. Everybody switched... It works well. It solves a real problem. "That was an example of how you can provide a compelling reason to move on — and make the change."

  • What to do in case of a Linux kernel panic

    Linux is used everywhere in the IT world. You've probably used Linux today, even if you didn't realize it. If you have learned anything about Linux, then you know it is indeed a kernel. The kernel is the primary unit of the Linux operating system (OS) and is responsible for communications between a computer's hardware and its processes. In this article, you will learn about one situation related to the Linux kernel: The kernel panic. The term itself can make you panic, but if you have the proper knowledge, then you can remain calm. Every system admin faces this issue at least once in their career, but reinstalling the system is not the first solution you should turn to. [...] Now, anytime you see a kernel panic error, you will definitely not panic because you know why this error occurred and how to resolve it. This article covers one of the common Linux boot problems: kernel panic. There are so many other potential boot problems that can occur in Linux, but resolving those issues will become much less of a panic when you gain some advanced knowledge of your system.

Audiocasts/Shows: Apple Hype From the Viewpoint of GNU/Linux

  • The M1 Macbook Pro (From a Linux users perspective) - YouTube

    I have the new Macbook Pro with the M1 CPU in the studio, and I decided to make a video to give you guys my thoughts on it. This is not a super-detailed review, as Mac isn't my platform of choice. Since my primary OS is Linux, I thought it might make for an interesting video.

  • Will Apple's move to ARM lead to Linux Desktop DOMINANCE?
  • Linus Torvalds on Apple M1 Mac, Blender, PulseAudio, 25 Years of GIMP | This Week in Linux 127 - TuxDigital

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a lot of Audio related news this week. We’ve got a new release from the Digital Audio Workstation, Ardour. A new release of PulseAudio, AV Linux, and we’ve got some interesting news from Fedora about potentially switching to PipeWire. In App News this week, we’ll check out the latest release of Blender and celebrate 25 Years of GIMP. Linus Torvalds commented on using Linux on Apple’s new M1 Mac and we’ll round the show out with a new product from Pine64, a soldering iron, and there has been a distro merge between Sabayon and Funtoo. All that and much more coming up right now on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

IBM/Red Hat: DevNation, Education and Matrix for Fedora

  • Cloud-native modernization or death? A false dichotomy - Red Hat Developer

    DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about cloud-native modernization from Daniel Oh and Burr Sutter. Are you familiar with the tight coupling of applications with their underlying platform that makes change hard? Or, coupling that creates a lack of scalability, performance, and flexibility for existing applications built with legacy technology? How about the fact that re-architecting applications cannot be done overnight? If you say yes to any of these, you probably think that you have “cloud-native modernization or death.” But what if there is another way that shows you the incremental steps to refactor the application to microservices and make use of Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift to effectively deploy and manage it at scale on the cloud?

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  • Red Hat : Emerging Trends of Using Open Source Software in Education

    Traditionally, software has been classified into application system software and operating systems software. Application software facilitate users' work in executing routine processes while operating systems software is designed to make all the different hardware components, as well as all the peripherals, work together and operate as an integrated machine. Examples of modern operating systems software are various flavors of Microsoft Windows, and Red Hat Linux. The Microsoft Office Suite (with MS Word, MS Excel, MS PowerPoint, MS Access, and MS Publisher) are good examples of application software. Fact is, for almost every thinkable task under the sun, there exist an application software that can execute the task. Most software are proprietary and owned by somebody. To use it, one has to purchase it from the developer or a distribution point. Also, a user cannot modify the software code if it is proprietary. Software that fall in this category is classified as closed. A good example is Microsoft's products.

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  • Kevin Fenzi: Matrix and Fedora

    Recently the Fedora Council has been floating the idea of modernizing the Fedora community real-time chat platform (currently IRC hosted at freenode.net). The front runner is matrix. I last looked at matrix 4 or so years ago, so I thought it would be a good time to revisit it and see how it looks today. TLDR: I suspect we will have IRC and Matrix bridged together for a long time to come, if you are new user, use Matrix, if not keep using IRC. First a few words about IRC (Internet Relay Chat). IRC is a 30+ year old chat protocol. There’s tons of clients. There’s tons of bots and add-ons. There’s tons of gateways and aggregators. So, whats not to like? Well, everything is a add-on mish mash that can be very confusing and frustrating for new users. For example, IRC has no persistance, you only see messages while your client is connected. So, folks invented irc “bouncers” to connect for you to the IRC networks you care about and when you reconnect play back all the messages you missed. Authentication is via messaging various services bots. Encryption is via plugins or other add ons (and often not setup). So, most old timers have a client they have carefully tuned, a bouncer and a bunch of custom bots, which is fine, but new users (not surprisingly) find this all a hassle and frustrating. IRC also has it’s own culture and rituals, some of which still make sense to me, but others that don’t. Matrix on the other hand is pretty new (6 years). You can interact with it as a guest or have an account on a particular homeserver. If you have an account all your history is saved, and can be synced to your client on login. You can send pictures and moves and fancy gifs. You can (somewhat) have end to end encryption (see clients below) with encrypted rooms where the server can’t know what was said in the room. You can have ‘reactions’ to things people say. You can redact something you said in the past. You can have a nice avatar and a Real Name (if you like). You can join rooms/conversations with other matrix servers (for example the kde, mozilla and others are running servers). You can get read receipts to see who read your message and notifications when someone is typing (also client dependent see below). [...] The real question is how long should we keep the current situation with Matrix and IRC bridged? What advantages would be dropping the irc bridges bring? Right now, not too much. End to end encryption isn’t that interesting for an open source project. Reactions are interesting (think about using them to vote up or down proposals in meetings?), but we have done without them so far. I think migration from IRC is going to be a long process, nor is there great advantage to pushing things to go faster. I hope that over coming years matrix clients continue to get better and implement more features. Someday (probably years down the road) more Fedora users will be on Matrix than IRC, then sometime after that things will have shifted enough that the community will start assuming you are on Matrix.

RADV Vulkan Drive and Vulkan Improvements

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Enables NGG For AMD VanGogh APUs - Phoronix

    Up to now the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has only enabled Next-Gen Geometry (NGG) support by default for discrete graphics cards. But now that requirement is lifted for supporting NGG on forthcoming GFX10.3 (RDNA 2) APUs. The forthcoming and very exciting VanGogh APUs will now see NGG enabled when running on the RADV Vulkan driver, similar to a previous change made for the RadeonSI Gallium3D OpenGL driver.

  • Vulkan Improvements & Fixes Land In FFmpeg - Phoronix

    Landing in FFmpeg this week were the first batch of Vulkan improvements since the prior big push in May. There are various fixes, changes to allow custom Vulkan device contexts, possible segmentation fault fixes, optionally enabling more Vulkan extensions for usage, supporting more pixel formats, improving the download/upload paths, and other work. Recent Vulkan changes to FFmpeg can be found via this GitHub search with the recent contributions by developer Lynne.