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fieldyweb's blog

How to secure the plex web interface behind a reverse proxy

These are some instructions i put together to get plexweb working from home over https using an NGINX reverse proxy. Might be useful to someone.

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OMG what happened to CentOS 7 Desktop?

As an Ubuntu user i always keep an eye out on other distros i've used over the years Sabayon, OpenSuse however CentOS is never a desktop distro i'd think of, always felt like heading back to 1990 on the desktop.. Time it seems however have changed

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New HTPC the Lenovo Ideastation Q190 & Ubuntu

We cut the cord a couple of years ago, the need to get TV over traditional TV Ariel was no longer needed and services such as TV Catchup, iPlayer and the other UK Catchup TV Channels streamed over the net to my TV were all we needed.

Having had an Asrock 330 Ion be the trusty device for nearly 5 years the box finally gave up the shost last week.

The options available for using the internet to provide your TV are huge, from the giants of Apple with Apple TV, Google are dipping their toes in the water they have the ChromeCast, and there are a huge bagfull of Android Devices which all claim to plug into the HDMI port of your TV.. Then there is the Raspberry PI which has a custom build of OS's to provide different interfaces.

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Why is Security not Turned on by Default?

Filed under
Just talk

This isn't a Windows thing, Linux as well should be more secure than the assumption that the OS with elevated privileges is secure enough, there is so much more Desktop Linux could be doing to make the users experience more secure.

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Sometimes the Tech pres just gets it wrong..

Filed under
Just talk

While I know this is a Linux site, i feel that Windows RT is getting the same bad rap Linux gets from the Tech press in many areas. A lack of true understanding of just what they are dealing with or just a huge need to present some form of being part of the crowd. I'm not sure just what it is however it needs to change. It's the same thing that happens when some people review Ubuntu PHone for example and claim it's not a viable platform.. and it annoys me..

Why Everything you've read in the tech press about Windows RT is WRONG!!

Head to head the best of class, the Lumia 920 and the Nexus 4

Filed under
Just talk

With the tenuous link of Linux/android I take a look at just how googles flagship device stands up against the top WP8 phone

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OpenSUSE from an Ubuntu users point of view..

Filed under
Reviews

I'm not a huge fan of VS posts, you know, Linux Mint VS Fedora.. I'm a Linux user, and i've recently migrated from Ubuntu to OpenSuse to see what the other side of the fence is likem what's done different, what is good, what is not so good. I've put together a few observations

Please, have a read

Fixing OpenSuse’s Dog Awful default fonts…

Filed under
Howtos

Lets not beat around the bush here, the default font rendering in OpenSuse and the default font do not an OS fit for reading make.. this can be fixed however..

Love or hate Ubuntu, out of the box it has one of the best font rendering setups of any distro and considering how much time we spend on our PC’s setting your fonts up correctly is one less headach, literally.

I’m not sure how much of these instructions I got right, however after a reboot the screen text does at least look better..

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Stopping Screen Flickering on Ivy Bridge Laptops using Linux

Filed under
Howtos

This is a solution to a problem which has been dogging me on every version of Linux I install on the Acer Aspire S3. I'm hoping it will help someone.

Read my solution

My thoughts after nearly a week with KDE 4.10

I'm switching to KDE from Gnome 3 for a Month.. This is nearly a week..

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Linux Desktops KDE 4 vs Unity vs Gnome 3 in the real world.

If you’ve chosen one of the major Linux distributions chances are (unless you’re a Mint user) you’ve come across the three big Linux Gui’s KDE, Gnome 3 and Unity.

The problem with any post like this is it’s an opinion piece, and with out a shadow of a doubt my opinion is probably going to vastly different to a lot of people out there. Linux users can be ferociously protective of not just their choice of distro, but their choice of Desktop as well.

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Time for a discreet OSX feature to come over to Linux.

Filed under
Linux

There is functionality in OSX called Airdrop which Linux Desktops could do with as a replacement of the SMB/NFS shared files sharing system. There are some options out with but they are seemingly stale projects which however can provide the functionality which is needed in Linux

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The question is, Which OS is the best? The replies were interesting.

Filed under
Linux

asking this very simple question which is the best Operating system in some corners of the Internet, is like throwing a slab of raw meat into a wild animal enclosure and watching as the question gets ripped apart. Its tantamount to asking which religion or political system is the best in the way some will tear strips off others

The rest here...

Is OpenSuse a viable Ubuntu alternative?

Filed under
Linux

There’s lots of forums and even 3 or 4 releases in I still hear people talking about how much they dislike Unity, which is a shame because it’s turning into quite a nice Gui from where i’m sitting, however one thing Linux has is choice. If nothing else there are other solid, stable distributions out there which offer a user a good solid alternative. Once such example is maybe OpenSUSE.

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Getting any distro to work on an Acer S3 feels like its 2002 again..

I've been having a problem all week stopping some insane screen tearing on an Acer Aspire S3, I've got to a point where its better, usable, but not perfect, so i've posted what I've done and it might help someone else.

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Nettop, the command not the hardware is not just for OSX..

Filed under
Linux

I found this article on the osxdaily website, the article refers to running nettop on OSX however it’s a *nix command so will also be in the package repository (if not preinstalled) on your favorite distro. I’ve tested all of the command options on Sabayon and they work fine..

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Using dual factor authentication on Linux..

Filed under
Linux

I’m really starting to appreciate the benifits of dual factor authentication across the board, so this Howtoforge article is of interest to anyone who wants to secure SSH access on thier Linux systems. I previously posted about using your mobile phone as the something you have bit, well this is another method.

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HOW TO DO MASS ENROLLING OF YUBIKEY WITH LINOTP

Filed under
Linux

While you may have your Ubuntu install locked down with Full disk encryption incase you loose the laptop, UFW locking down the network with a firewall, there is no point if you have a poor password. Dual factor authentication using One Time Passwords may be an option for you, if they are this great howtoforge article might point you in the right direction.

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Why is PRISM so shocking? Everyone is reading our data

Filed under
Just talk

With prism being the story of the week, I'm just asking a simple question

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Setting up a serial console

This is a bit old school however if you are a Sysadmin you might need to get a console up for a Cisco or other device. I hope this helps

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More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • RcppSimdJson 0.1.1: More Features

    A first update following for the exciting RcppSimdJson 0.1.0 release last month is now on CRAN. Version 0.1.1 brings further enhancements such direct parsing of raw chars, working with compressed files as well as much expanded querying ability all thanks to Brendan, some improvements to our demos thanks to Daniel as well as a small fix via a one-liner borrowed from upstream for a reported UBSAN issue. RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators. Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle use per byte parsed; see the video of the talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (also voted best talk).

  • Jonathan Dowland: Generic Haskell

    When I did the work described earlier in template haskell, I also explored generic programming in Haskell to solve a particular problem. StrIoT is a program generator: it outputs source code, which may depend upon other modules, which need to be imported via declarations at the top of the source code files. The data structure that StrIoT manipulates contains information about what modules are loaded to resolve the names that have been used in the input code, so we can walk that structure to automatically derive an import list. The generic programming tools I used for this are from Structure Your Boilerplate (SYB), a module written to complement a paper of the same name.

  • 9 reasons I upgraded from AngularJS to Angular

    In 2010, Google released AngularJS, an open source, JavaScript-based frontend structure for developing single-page applications (SPAs) for the internet. With its move to version 2.0 in 2016, the framework's name was shortened to Angular. AngularJS is still being developed and used, but Angular's advantages mean it's a smart idea to migrate to the newer version.

  • [Old/Odd] 5 news feautures of PHP-7.2

    Before PHP 7.2 the object keyword was used to convert one data type to another (boxing and unboxing), for example, an array to an object of the sdtClass class and/or vice versa, as of PHP 7.2 the object data type can be used as parameter type or as function return type.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 351

Proprietary Software and Linux Foundation

  • [PCLinuxOS] Opera Browser updated to 70.0.3728.106

    Opera is a Chromium-based browser using the Blink layout engine. It differentiates itself because of a distinct user interface and other features.

  • Vivaldi Explains Why They Make "Proprietary Garbage"

    It is unfair to say that Vivaldi is not open source at all as someone like Distrotube has done, the way the company behind Vivaldi has decided to handle this application is by using a dual licensing system where the open source portion of the application is licensed under an open source BSD license but that's not the point of today, the point is to explain why they have decided to license their software in such a way.

  • Scientists Forced To Change Names Of Human Genes Because Of Microsoft's Failure To Patch Excel

    Six years ago, Techdirt wrote about a curious issue with Microsoft's Excel. A default date conversion feature was altering the names of genes, because they looked like dates. For example, the tumor suppressor gene DEC1 (Deleted in Esophageal Cancer 1) was being converted to "1-DEC". Hardly a widespread problem, you might think. Not so: research in 2016 found that nearly 20% of 3500 papers taken from leading genomic journals contained gene lists that had been corrupted by Excel's re-interpretation of names as dates. Although there don't seem to be any instances where this led to serious errors, there is a natural concern that it could distort research results. The good news is this problem has now been fixed. The rather surprising news is that it wasn't Microsoft that fixed it, even though Excel was at fault. As an article in The Verge reports:

  • The Linux Foundation Wants Open-Source Tech to Address Future Pandemics

    The Linux Foundation, which supports open-source innovation in blockchain tech, launched the Linux Foundation Public Health Initiative (LFPHI) at the end of July. The LFPHI’s goal is to promote the use of open source by public health authorities, which can be scrutinized by anyone, to fight not just COVID-19 but future pandemics as well.

  • LF Edge’s Akraino Project Release 3 Now Available, Unifying Open Source Blueprints Across MEC, AI, Cloud and Telecom Edge

    LF Edge, an umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system, today announced the availability of Akraino Release 3 (“Akraino R3”). Akraino’s third and most mature release to date delivers fully functional edge solutions– implemented across global organizations– to enable a diversity of edge deployments across the globe. New blueprints include a focus on MEC, AI/ML, and Cloud edge. In addition, the community authored the first iteration of a new white paper to bring common open edge API standards to align the industry.

  • Linux Foundation Launches Jenkins X Training Course

    Linux Foundation has launched a new training course, LFS268 – CI/CD with Jenkins X. Developed in conjunction with the Continuous Delivery Foundation, the course will introduce the fundamentals of Jenkins X.

GNU/Linux Laptops/Desktop: Librem 14, System76 and More

  • Librem 14 Enhancements

    The Hardware kill switches have seen a number of enhancements. This is also the first Purism laptop to ship with a BIOS write protection switch and all M.2 key-E interfaces implemented. The Librem 14 is our most powerful and most secure laptop yet. If you want full control over your computer with cutting-edge, powerful hardware, the Librem 14 is the best (some would say the only) choice. Make it yours here.

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  • The 2020 System76 Oryx Pro: Their Best 15" Laptop Yet!

    I've had the new System76 Oryx Pro in the studio for a while now, and in this full review, I'll give you guys my thoughts. We'll take a look at the hardware, switchable graphics, and discover the meaning of life along the way.

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  • Is Microsoft finally getting its Windows update act together?

    Updating Windows has become a bad joke. I can install three Linux distributions in the same time it takes me to make a single serious Windows upgrade.

SUSE: OBS, 'Cloud' and Chat With Linux Kernel Developer at SUSE

  • OBS NDI™ Plugin on openSUSE

    The NDI plugin offers a fairly easy way to send OBS video signal (presumably other applications can take advantage of this too) to another OBS instance on another machine. This can come in handy for numerous reasons such as splitting up workloads between machines by capturing output from one machine, such as gaming computer, to stream with a dedicated unit that interfaces with YouTube. This has advantages in that you can move the machine doing the heavy lifting into another room or across the room as to not hear the fans and so forth. In my case, my primary machine is getting long in the tooth. I prefer the setup I have as far as the screen layout and height of the computer as well as the location. I use my AMD Desktop / server / workstation machine to talk to YouTube or Twitch directly with that OBS instance and record locally in effect freeing up my laptop from quite a bit of the workload.

  • Data Explosion – Is the Cloud Your Silver Bullet?
  • Women in Tech: “Aptitude has nothing to do with gender or inborn capabilities”

    Women are underrepresented in the tech sector —myth or reality? Three years ago, we launched a diversity series aimed at bringing the most inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to your attention. Today, we’d like you to meet Jessica Yu, Linux Kernel Developer at SUSE. A research study by The National Center for Women & Information Technology showed that “gender diversity has specific benefits in technology settings,” which could explain why tech companies have started to invest in initiatives that aim to boost the number of female applicants, recruit them in a more effective way, retain them for longer, and give them the opportunity to advance. But is it enough? Three years ago, we launched a diversity series aimed at bringing the most inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to your attention. Today, we’d like you to meet Jessica Yu, Linux Kernel Developer at SUSE.