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ggarron's blog

Nginx vs Apache with APC and Varnish

Filed under
Linux

There are a lot of test and comparisons about Nginx vs Apache. And yes for static content because it is asynchronous, Nginx preforms better. What happens when you have PHP?

I have setup two servers with:

  • Apache + PHP + APC + Varnish
  • Nginx + PHP-FPM + APC + Varnish

Three good and useful Firefox add-ons

Filed under
Linux

One of the great things about Firefox is that the community can contribute to it with add-ons, some of the are really fantastic. There are a lot of them, so much, that is really difficult if not impossible to know all of them, here I present three of them to you.

Eight great Linux stories that made digg front page in 2007

Filed under
Linux

With 2007 ending, it start to appear reviews of the year everywhere, so this is my contribution to that.
I decided to pick up the best (at least for me) Digg front page stories about Linux in 2007

Solving "current dist not found in meta-release" error to upgrade to Gutsy

Filed under
Howtos

If you are getting these errors while upgrading to Gutsy Gibbon.

warning: could not initiate dbus
current dist not found in meta-release

Create a VPN with openVPN complete guide

Filed under
Howtos

Havin security as a constant issue, we all are always thinking in a good way to avoid people getting access to our passwords, and personal information.

Enable Syntax Color on vim

If you want to have you vim coloring your edited files according to its syntax, you can follow this instructions to have them enabled, read at:
Linux operating system

Upgrade Feisty Fawn to Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
Howtos

You can now upgrade your Feisty Fawn to Gutsy Gibbon, and start testing this new Ubuntu release, How to upgrade from Feisty Fawn to Gutsy Gibbon

The power of Debian and Mandriva together on your PC

If you are a Linux Fan but could not decide which distro is the best for you, try to run two of them in a Dual Boot system, with both Distributions sharing the /home directory so you can have access to your files no matter which distro you boot.

Installing Beryl on Mandriva, really easy with screenshots

Filed under
Howtos

The easy way to install Beryl on the new Mandriva 2007 Spring, this guide with screenshots will show you how easy it is, you will not even need to use any console command.

How (Beryl and Compiz) are helping Linux

Filed under
Linux

Composite project is helping Linux in gaining more users, specially those trying to view the 3D effects using XP (they can't) or Vista (Linux does better with less)
read the post here, at Linux Operating System

Sharing files between Feisty and Windows

Filed under
Howtos

This How To, describe how to configure in a simple way a samba server on your Feisty Fawn, (could be used for other distros) to share files with windows. Samba on Feisty Fawn

backing up your mysql database using your browser -with php-

Filed under
Howtos

Hi,

As I wanted to back up my mysql database on a server where I do not have ssh access only ftp, I made this way to do it, there surely be some better ways, if so I will be glad to know about them, but until that this is working for me.

Backing up your MySQL from web browser using php

Which Distro to choose? - Comparison -(Not a Debian vs Ubuntu vs Fedora vs Centos)

Filed under
Linux

This article compares four of the major distros, from an impartial point of view and try to show some of the facts that make them different, so you can read and choose which better suite your needs.
read it here

Centos 5.0 Released

Filed under
News

CentOS 5.0 the Linux distro based on RedHat has been released, few weeks later RedHat itself has been released.
The news for this version of Centos are among others:

Apache-2.2, kernel-2.6.18, Gnome-2.16, KDE-3.5, Compiz, AIGLX, MySQL-5.0, PostgreSQL-8.1, and much more

It has support for i386 and x86_64 platforms, on its 6 and 7 CDs respectively

Shell Script for Automatically create Apache2 Virtual Servers

Filed under
Howtos

This script permits you to automatically create Apache2, Virtual server, it creates the directory and the configuration files for the virtual server, useful if you need to create a lot of virtual servers, after this you just need to go to the virtual server directory and create the site itself.

read more here

New Ubuntu to be released by October (Gutsy Gibbon)

Filed under
News

Ubuntu 7.10 is going to be called Gutsy Gibbon, and will be release by October this year, today the project was introduced by Mark Shuttleworth, read more at Go2Linux.org

Guided Debian Etch installation (with screenshots)

Filed under
Howtos

The new Debian Etch has been released, here are the installation screenshots, with a step by step guided installation.

Read the complete article of Installing Debian Etch with screenshots

Debian Etch Stable released!!

Filed under
News

This is extracted from the Debian Site, we finally have Etch Stable released!!

Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 updated

Filed under
News

There is a new update for Debian/Sarge, this is security update only, the good new is that reading in lines, we can expect that the final release of Etch is really near, as the sarge is being moved to old stable.
read more

Puppy Linux 2.15 Community Editio released

Filed under
News

The Puppy 2.15CE (Community Edition) is the result of collaboration of a team of Puppy enthusiasts. It is built upon version 2.14 but with many enhancements. In particular the guys have worked on an improved user-interface and nice out-of-the box first impression.

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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News, and SMLR

Review: Artix Linux in 2021

Artix Linux is a fork (or continuation as an autonomous project) of the Arch-OpenRC and Manjaro-OpenRC projects. Artix Linux offers a lightweight, rolling-release operating system featuring alternative init software options, including OpenRC, runit, and s6. The distribution is available in many editions, including Base, Cinnamon, LXDE, LXQt, MATE, KDE Plasma and Xfce. With all of the desktop options, combined with the available init choices, there are 21 editions, not including community spins from which to choose. All editions appear to be built for 64-bit (x86_64) machines. Picking randomly, I selected Artix's Plasma edition featuring the runit init software. The download for this edition is is 1.3GB. Browsing the other editions it looks like most flavours are about 1.1GB to 1.3GB in size, though the minimal Base edition is a compact 618MB. The project's live media boots to the KDE Plasma desktop. On the desktop we find multiple documentation and README icons. There is also an icon for launching the system installer. The default layout places a panel at bottom of the screen where we can find the application menu and system tray. The default wallpaper is a soft blue while the theme for windows and menus is dark with high contrast fonts. [...] Artix Linux is one of those distributions I really enjoy using and yet struggle to review in a meaningful way because it doesn't really go out of its way to introduce new or exciting features and everything works smoothly. The distribution is wonderfully easy to install, offers top-notch performance, and is unusually light on resources. Artix is somewhat minimal, but still ships enough software to be immediately useful right out of the gate. We can browse the web, install packages, view files, and play videos. Meanwhile the application menu isn't cluttered with a lot of extras. The developers clearly expect us to install the functionality we need, while doing a really good job of providing enough for the desktop environment to feel base-line useful right from the start. Artix does a nice job of balancing performance and functionality while also juggling ease of use against not getting in the way. There is a little documentation, but no initial welcome screen or configuration wizards that might distract the user. The one piece I felt was missing was a graphical package manager which would have made it easier to build the extra functionality I wanted on top of the base distribution. However, that one piece aside, I felt as though Artix was really well designed and put together, at lease for someone like me. It's not a distribution geared toward beginners, it's not a "first distro". It is a bit minimal and requires command line knowledge. However, for someone with a little experience with Linux, for someone who doesn't mind the occasional trip to the command line or installing new applications as needed, then Artix provides an excellent experience. It's fast, light, looks (in my opinion) great with the default theme, and elegantly walks the line between minimalism and having enough applications ready to go out of the box to be immediately useful. I'm unusually impressed with how smooth and trouble-free my experience was with this distribution and the fact it offers such a range of desktop and init diversity is all the more appealing. Read more

Alpine Linux Review: Ultimate Distro for Power Users

Alpine Linux is gathering a lot of attention because of its super-small size and focus on security. However, Alpine is different from some of the other lightweight distros we covered on FOSSLinux. It isn’t your typical desktop distribution as it is terminal-based like Arch and is marketed as a “general purpose distro.” It is currently widely adopted as a Docker container thanks to its ultra-small footprint. However, it can be used for all sorts of Linux deployments that benefit from small, resource-efficient Linux distros. Now, that statement might feel too generic. But don’t worry, as we have put together an in-depth and comprehensive review of Alpine Linux, giving you a detailed look at what it has under the hood and how to use it. As such, by the end, you should have a clear understanding of whether you should consider Alpine Linux as your next Linux distro. So without further ado, let’s dive in. Read more

Programming Leftovers

  • How to manipulate strings in bash

    Without explicit support for variable types, all bash variables are by default treated as character strings. Therefore more often than not, you need to manipulate string variables in various fashions while working on your bash script. Unless you are well-versed in this department, you may end up constantly coming back to Google and searching for tips and examples to handle your specific use case. In the spirit of saving your time and thus boosting your productivity in shell scripting, I compile in this tutorial a comprehensive list of useful string manipulation tips for bash scripting. Where possible I will try to use bash's built-in mechanisms (e.g., parameter expansion) to manipulate strings instead of invoking external tools such as awk, sed or grep. If you find any missing tips, feel free to suggest it in the comment. I will be happy to incorporate it in the article.

  • Python Generators

    Python generators are very powerful for handling operations which require large amount of memory.

  • We got lucky

    If you’re having enough production incidents to be able to evaluate your preparation, you’re probably either unlucky or unprepared ;) If you have infrequent incidents you may be well prepared but it’s hard to tell. Chaos engineering experiments are a great way to test your preparation, and practice incident response in a less stressful context. It may seem like a huge leap from your current level of preparation to running automated chaos monkeys in production, but you don’t need to go straight there. Why not start with practice drills? You could have a game host who comes up with a failure scenario. You can work up to chaos in production.

  • React Testing Library – Tutorial with JavaScript Code Examples

    This post will help you to learn what React Testing Library is, and how you can use it to test your React application. This tutorial will assume you already know some basic JavaScript and understand the basics of how React works. React Testing Library is a testing utility tool that's built to test the actual DOM tree rendered by React on the browser. The goal of the library is to help you write tests that resembles how a user would use your application, so that you'll have more confidence that your application work as intended when a real user do use it.

  • Why I Moved From Ops to DevOps (and why you might want to)