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srlinuxx's blog

Yikes! Mad Cow Cover-Up?

Dr. Lester Friedlander, a former USDA vet, said that inspectors are allowed only 15 seconds of inspection and that unhygenic practices are common in the meat industry; practices such as cow carcass abscesses being hosed off, wrapped up and shipped to the consumer. He also states that some supervisors were more concerned about falsifying inspection documents than protecting consumers.

Where's the beef?

err, I mean beta? Wasn't mandrak^H^Hiva supposed to release a 2006 beta 1 on the 15th? I've not seen any mention of it on the cooker mailing list or sign on the mirrors. Seems they are having some troubles, but that's a business as usual (for any developing distro). They were having some mirror syncing problems a few days back, I experienced this first hand when I tried to update my cooker install as well as some conflict with kde packages. There might be some shorewall bug problems, there's some mention of libtool gcc compatibility, and some grub conflicts a day or two ago. Anyway, I keep looking for a beta everyday. Somebody poke me if they see it.

Holy Multitasking Batman

While perusing my favorite thread of my favorite site I saw this setup. The appropriate witty response failed me as I first thought "You need to get to work son" or "quit wasting time" or perhaps "you should take up computing"... my mind raced around as all I could utter was "holy cow".

Anyway, I thought it was interesting enough to folks that don't visit the gentoo forums to list here.

The owner's, baeksu, description.

My MiniSlack Memoirs

I knew when I published my MiniSlack review that I might get some unkind comments, and I thought I was prepared. By the end of the day I guess I wasn't. I thought one poster was going to be helpful and constructive, but his final post drove me to disable comments and delete the posts made. I received a private message from one gentleman who may have been disappointed by my results, but at least he was respectful, professional, and helpful. He has provoked this commentary.

One Fine Trick

Those cute Southpark icons on the right of his desktop represent folks in his instant messenger list. They change coloration to indicate their online status. Ain't that the neato-ist thing?

Recent Review Rounds

Filed under
Reviews

I've had some successes and not so successful adventures. I got stampeded by Buffalo, a distro whose name intrigued me. I didn't achieve any yingyang with Zen, whose logo was so darn cute. And my fruit went sour with Berry, whose motif was quite appetizing.

My latest efforts are with Lunar. After I finally discovered the commands Lunar uses to install software, I was on my way. I didn't tweak any compile flags or set up distcc, but it's still kinda neato to watch it compile up your applications from scratch. I don't think Lunar is for everyone, as it's taken a little coaxing at times, but i got xorg and the kde desktop installed and running, as well as xawtv!

Downtime

Filed under
Site News

Sorry for the downtime, it's been a rough day. Not only was my Symphony story getting a lot of play, but I was also the subject of ddos attacks on the site and my mail server. It seems to have subsided some now, and I'm back up. I do apologize.

I been Buffalo'd

Filed under
Reviews

Buffalo Linux 1.7.3 was released on May 10 and it sounded quite interesting. I'd visted their website a couple times in the past but never installed this oddly named distro. Now with the site up and running I thought the time was right.

DOOM: The Movie update

Filed under
News

Arrrgs. I go to gamespy just about everyday but somehow I missed this cool Doom3 movie update. It sounds pretty cool. They even have some great stills! It looks like it's gonna be exciting - I am excited - I can hardly wait.

The Site: first quarter report

Filed under
Site News

Today marks the anniversary of my first quarter year actually getting hits. I started a little website last July actually, but I started getting some reads when I installed drupal then began posting a few links to stories on Feb. 04 and finally posted my first original article on Feb. 08.

We have since grown to over 100,000 hits last month. I hope to continue to grow as I learn what the audience wants to read. My hopes also include promoting Linux and helping the world see the advantages of oss while having lots of fun in the process. Because to me, that's the biggest advantage of running Linux - it's just plain fun.

Heyyyy, /My/ Screenshots on Ebay!?

Filed under
Humor

What's up with that!? Someone scarfed some of my screenshots to help sell cheap home-made Mandriva dvds. Think I should get some royalties? Big Grin Oh well, least he linked to my review. That Ebay link.

May Enlightenment

Filed under
Just talk

I installed kde cvs a week or so back after posting my Month with Fluxbox - Part 2, yet I always seemed to choose fluxbox when it came time to log into X. I very much enjoyed running fluxbox, but I'm gonna run enlightment during May and see how it goes.

A teehee

Filed under
Humor

In reply during a conversation with a good friend, I received this funny with the line, "yeah, but did you have to post about it?" lol He's a nutcase!

A Month With Fluxbox - Part 2

Filed under
Reviews

My month with Fluxbox can almost be officially over and it's time to report on my experiences as promised. I wish I had a long list of complaints to file or problems for which I had to find answers or even less than compelling reasons to run back to KDE (i.e. something interesting or controversial to write about). But the truth is, it sat back there serving up my windows and never once gave me reason to even notice it was there. And that's a good thing.

General Hardware Tips

Filed under
Howtos

I saw this thread in the gentoo forums with some wonderful information for folks experiencing hardware failures or inconsistencies, boot failures, or data loss and the ilk. I think it might be helpful to some, so I thought I'd post a link to it.

Thread.

RoE Will Soon Come to Linux

I read from a link of a link today that Doom: Resurrection of Evil will be supported on Linux come Doom 3 patch 1.3. Big Grin yippee.

Neato Pic

Filed under
Just talk

My sister sent me this Kincaid gif this morning. I thought it was kinda neato so I figured I'd share. It don't have anything to do with anything, but...

Performance Tweaks & Tips

Filed under
Howtos

Has your system seemed to have slowed down lately or perhaps it never performed the way you thought it should. Do you ever exclaim, seems my friend's computer is much faster than mine... or the dreaded, my XP is faster than linux? Bite your tongue and check out a few things on your gentoo install.

I don my asbestos house robe and share a few things I've learned from my time with gentoo. Actually these principals can be applied to any linux installation, but I had gentoo in mind when writing them.

New Logo

Filed under
Site News

Just wanted to post a big THANK YOU to jrangels for donating his time and wonderful talent to make us a great new logo and header background image here at tuxmachines.org. You might know his work from being offered on kde-look.org or from being the primary graphic artist for pclinuxos. His newest work for that distro is on display in the tuxgallery. Mosey on by and take a look before you leave.

Thanks again Jose.

Mini Distro Round-Up

Filed under
Reviews

Distributions that can fit on a mini-cd are today's answer to the floppy distros of yesteryear. Those floppy distros were so handy for those quick repairs, setting up a filesystem on a new harddrive, or just killing a Saturday night. Nothing like the satisfaction of overcoming the difficulties getting MuLinux to dial up to the internet or even boot into a mini X. Hal was my favorite though. I still have my Hal floppy. They were just plain fun!

Today we have our mini-distros too, some as small as 50MB. There isn't much of a challenge these days though, just boot and go. With a weekend off from work, I thought I'd get reacquainted with an old friend and hopefully make some new ones. I test drove 5 of the smallest distros I could find and I'll tell you what I discovered.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Arm Server CPUs: You Can Now Buy Ampere's eMAG in a Workstation

    Avantek offers the system with three optional graphics cards: AMD FirePro W2100, a Radeon Pro WX 5100, and the NVIDIA Quadro GV100. OS options are variants of Linux: Ubuntu, CentOS, SUSE SLES, and openSUSE.

  • A General Notification Queue Was Pushed Back From Linux 5.5 Introduction

    Red Hat has been working on a "general notification queue" that is built off the Linux kernel's pipe code and will notify the user-space of events like key/keyring changes, block layer events like disk errors, USB attach/remove events, and other notifications without user-space having to continually poll kernel interfaces. This general notification queue was proposed for Linux 5.5 but has been pushed back to at least 5.6. This Linux kernel general notification queue builds off a standard pipe and allows user-space applications to efficiently become aware of changes to block devices (disks), keys, USB subsystem happenings, and other possible events. The proposed documentation spells out more of the planned functionality and behavior.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the weeks 2019/48 & 49

    Once again I’m spanning two weeks; besides the normal work on getting you openSUSE Tumbleweed updated and timely delivered, the release team has been working together with the build service team to implement/stabilize the OBS-internal staging workflow. There is (should) not be any real noticeable difference for the contributors – except the new used URLs. The Factory Staging dashboard can now be found at https://build.opensuse.org/staging_workflows/1 During the last two weeks, we have pushed out 10 Tumbleweed Snapshots (1121, 1122, 1123, 1124, 1126, 1127, 1128, 1202, 1203 and 1204) containing those changes...

  • Rugged Coffee Lake PCs offer up to two PCIe slots and two HDD bays

    Nexcom’s fanless, Linux-ready “NISE 3900 Series” features an 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPU with triple display support plus M.2, mini-PCIe, 3x GbE, 10x USB, and 2x serial ports. Six different models have various combinations of PCIe, PCI, and SATA. Nexcom announced a new series in its NISE family of industrial computers that follows recent models such as the Apollo Lake based NISE 51. The rugged NISE-3900 Series systems run Linux Kernel 4.9 or Windows 10 on Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs, including the quad-core Core i3-8100T and the hexa-core, 2.1GHz i5-8500T and 2.4GHz i7-8700T.

  • More new books from The MagPi and HackSpace magazines

    If our recent release of Retro Gaming with Raspberry Pi, Getting Started with Arduino, and Coding the Classics isn’t enough for you, today sees the release of TWO MORE publications from Raspberry Pi Press!

OSS Leftovers

  • Ardour Digital Audio Workstation Finally Adds Native MP3 Importing Support

    While lossy compression audio formats like MP3 are not recommended for use within professional audio tasks, for those using the open-source Ardour digital audio workstation (DAW) software as of today there is finally native MP3 import support. Obviously it's better working with lossless audio formats as source material for Ardour and other digital audio workstation software suites, but given how common MP3 content is, there certainly is relevance to being able to import MP3s into DAWs. But historically due to licensing/patent issues, MP3 support within Ardour hasn't been possible -- thus leading to common complaints/questions by users over the years.

  • Certbot Leaves Beta with the Release of 1.0

    Earlier this week EFF released Certbot 1.0, the latest version of our free, open source tool that helps websites encrypt their traffic. The release of 1.0 is a significant milestone for the project and is the culmination of the work done over the past few years by EFF and hundreds of open source contributors from around the world.

    Certbot was first released in 2015 to automate the process of configuring and maintaining HTTPS encryption for site administrators by obtaining and deploying certificates from Let's Encrypt. Since its initial launch, many features have been added, including beta support for Windows, automatic nginx configuration, and support for over a dozen DNS providers for domain validation.

  • Open Repos provides code metrics on open source projects

    GitClear is offering Open Repos as a free product, though it is not open source. GitClear’s paid product offers many of the same insights and more. Long-term plans include allowing projects to embed an Open Repos view of a project in their site, and “improving data quality before adding features.”

  • Improvements in LibreOffice’s PowerPoint presentation support

    LibreOffice’s native file format is OpenDocument, a fully open and standardised format that’s great for sharing documents and long-term data storage. Of course, LibreOffice does its best to open files made by other office software as well, even if they’re stored in pseudo-“standards” with cryptic and obfuscated contents. Compatibility with PowerPoint PPT(X) presentations is therefore a challenge, but developers are working hard on improvements… A few months ago, we announced an initiative to improve the support of PPT and PPTX files in LibreOffice. Lots of great work happened since then and the results are collected below!

  • People of WordPress: Jill Binder

    Jill Binder never meant to become an activist. She insists it was an accident. Despite that, Jill has led the Diversity Outreach Speaker Training working group in the WordPress Community team since 2017. This group is dedicated to increasing the number of women and other underrepresented groups who are stepping up to become speakers at WordPress Meetups, WordCamps, and events. [...] The following year her internship advisor, who had become a client, was creating the first ever BuddyCamp for BuddyPress. He asked Jill to be on his organizing team. At that event she also moderated a panel with Matt Mullenweg. Then, Jill was invited to be on the core organizing team for WordCamp Vancouver. Part of this role meant reviewing and selecting speakers. From 40 speaker applications the team had to pick only 14 to speak.

  • Mint: Late-Stage Adversarial Interoperability Demonstrates What We Had (And What We Lost)

    In 2006, Aaron Patzer founded Mint. Patzer had grown up in the city of Evansville, Indiana—a place he described as "small, without much economic opportunity"—but had created a successful business building websites. He kept up the business through college and grad school and invested his profits in stocks and other assets, leading to a minor obsession with personal finance that saw him devoting hours every Saturday morning to manually tracking every penny he'd spent that week, transcribing his receipts into Microsoft Money and Quicken.

    Patzer was frustrated with the amount of manual work it took to track his finances with these tools, which at the time weren't smart enough to automatically categorize "Chevron" under fuel or "Safeway" under groceries. So he conceived on an ingenious hack: he wrote a program that would automatically look up every business name he entered into the online version of the Yellow Pages—constraining the search using the area code in the business's phone number so it would only consider local merchants—and use the Yellow Pages' own categories to populate the "category" field in his financial tracking tools.

today's howtos

Programming: Kotlin, Python and More

  • Android’s commitment to Kotlin

    When we announced Kotlin as a supported language for Android, there was a tremendous amount of excitement among developers. Since then, there has been a steady increase in the number of developers using Kotlin. Today, we’re proud to say nearly 60% of the top 1,000 Android apps contain Kotlin code, with more and more Android developers introducing safer and more concise code using Kotlin. During this year’s I/O, we announced that Android development will be Kotlin-first, and we’ve stood by that commitment. This is one of the reasons why Android is the gold partner for this year’s KotlinConf.

  • Google Reaffirms Commitment To Kotlin Programming Language For Android

    Google is continuing to embrace Kotlin programming for Android, making more Android APIs accessible by Kotlin, Jetpack Compose as a UI toolkit catered to Kotlin, and Kotlin extensions for more Google libraries. Google is also working to offer more Kotlin + Android learning material, working with JetBrains on improving the Kotlin code compiler, speeding up the build time of Kotlin code, and other improvements.

  • Comparing equivalent Python statements

    While teaching one of my Python classes yesterday I noticed a conditional expression which can be written in several ways. All of these are equivalent in their behavior...

  • Serving Files with Python's SimpleHTTPServer Module

    Servers are computer software or hardware that processes requests and deliver data to a client over a network. Various types of servers exist, with the most common ones being web servers, database servers, application servers, and transaction servers. Widely used web servers such as Apache, Monkey, and Jigsaw are quite time-consuming to set up when testing out simple projects and a developer's focus is shifted from producing application logic to setting up a server. Python's SimpleHTTPServer module is a useful and straightforward tool that developers can use for a number of use-cases, with the main one being that it is a quick way to serve files from a directory. It eliminates the laborious process associated with installing and implementing the available cross-platform web servers. Note: While SimpleHTTPServer is a great way to easily serve files from a directory, it shouldn't be used in a production environment. According to the official Python docs, it "only implements basic security checks."