Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

srlinuxx's blog

Mandriva Oops?

Filed under
Linux

I've been so happy with Mandriva 2010, and this little oops doesn't ruin it, but it does make me scratch my head.

OMG, Best new Mandriva Feature

Filed under
Linux

or maybe it's kde 4..., um, no, it's Mandriva...

Upgraded Site software

Filed under
Site News

I upgraded the Drupal software to the latest and greatest last night. All went well except one (or two) little niggle(s).

Machinarium - A Tasty Gaming Treat

What would you do if you were thrown and locked out of town separated from your true love? You'd fight every obstacle to return and rescue her, of course. And that's your goal in Machinarium. As the hero, you must figure out how to out-smart the bad guys and to save your lovely girlfriend.

3 Non-Linux sites I like

Filed under
Just talk

3 words I'm sick of hearing

Filed under
Linux

The Cloud
Twitter/twittering/tweets
Ubuntu

Some Things I Like about KDE 4

Filed under
Linux

I've been complaining all over the place about how much KDE 4 sucks. Then after my post earlier I remembered something I've even said to other folks about stuff before myself, "Well, go ask for your money back!" Towards that end, I thought I'd share some of the things I think are kinda cool about KDE 4.

Top 10 Things I HATE about KDE 4

Filed under
Linux

I've been trying to like to KDE 4 since before its very first developmental release. I've been a KDE user since my first day in Linux, about the time KDE was at version 1.99 (the version that shipped with Mandrake 7.2). The buzz for KDE4 was humming quite loud and lot of happy users posted how nice it was. I kept trying it and was always so disappointed in not being able to like it. Here are the top 10 things that drive me nuts.

In Search of KDE 4

Filed under
Linux

I've been trying to like KDE 4 since its inception, but that hasn't happened. Despite my resistance, I know I need to make the move. KDE 3.5 lost its last footholds in Linuxville and it will be hard to continue using it. So, with the good things I've been hearing about 4.3.2, I figured now was the time. It's been quite a journey so far, and I'm probably not home yet. But here are some of the places I've seen and things I've done.

whoosh, now that's weather

Filed under
Linux

I've been a little disappointed in the appearance of the weather applets in kde 4, but I was getting used to the LCD weather station, However, mandriva includes an extra one...

TM's Top 10 Linux Distributions of 2009

Filed under
Linux

Daniweb published their list of Top 10 Linux Distributions for 2009 and unfortunately I and not-just-I didn't agree with his list. So here's our Top 10 List:

SAM Linux - Great little OS

Filed under
Linux

While writing my column I was testing SAM Linux to feature as one of the Linux distributions released last month. And in playing around with it, I realized what an untapped treasure it is. Light apps, tasteful eyecandy, handy tools, multimedia and hardware support add up to make this one of the best out-of-the-box desktops available.

Quick Tip: Old games can't find /dev/dsp

Filed under
Howtos

If your old games, like UT, Quake2, or Rune, won't start or don't have sound due to the error "can't find /dev/dsp" on your modern Linux systems, it's because they were made when OSS (Open Sound System) was the preferred sound system in Linux.

downtime lately

Filed under
Site News

I apologize for the downtime lately. The cable has been going out quite a bit recently. No one at the other end of the phone line seems to know any reason why, but I have my suspicions.

today's downtime

Filed under
Site News

Sorry 'bout 'dat. We had a cable outage in the area today resulting in our downtime.

intermittent downtime

Filed under
Site News

The intermittent downtime today and last week was due to loss of electrical power in the neighborhood. For those still interested, I do still plan to seek off-site hosting soon.

update on tuxmachines issues

Filed under
Site News

I wanted to update folks on our issues of downtime and hosting, as well as personally thank those who have contributed funds to help offset the cost of hosting.

tuxmachines issues lately

Filed under
Site News

I've been putting off blogging what's going on with tuxmachines lately because number 1: I don't really know what happened, and number 2: I don't really know what's gonna happen. But here's what I do know.

Please vote in latest Poll

Filed under
Site News

Almost everyone likes to tell their chosen Linux distribution. It's like your favorite football team or music group. Please let tuxmachines visitors and Linux Format readers know your favorite distribution by voting in our latest poll. I need about 250 more votes - so vote now!

Whoops! downtime...

Filed under
Site News

Whoops, I did it again. Big Grin The approximate 1/2 hour downtime wallago was due to user error this time.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

What's your favorite terminal emulator?

Preference of a terminal emulator can say a lot about a person's workflow. Is the ability to drive mouseless a must-have? Do you like to navigate between tabs or windows? There's something to be said about how it makes you feel, too. Does it have that cool factor? Tell us about your favorite terminal emulator by taking our poll or leaving us a comment. How many have you tried? We asked our community to tell us about their experience with terminal emulators. Here are a few of the responses we received. Read more

Today in Techrights

First Ever Release of Ubuntu Cinnamon Distribution is Finally Here!

Ubuntu Cinnamon is a new distribution that utilizes Linux Mint’s Cinnamon desktop environment on top of Ubuntu code base. It’s first stable release is based on Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine. Read more

OSS: Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), Animal Vision, Outreachy and LibreOffice

  • US 2020 Election Security: Auditing Tool Coming Soon

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) said it is working with a non-partisan, non-profit group to customize an open source, post-election auditing tool to verify votes in the upcoming 2020 elections. The tool is known as Arlo. VotingWorks, an organization focused on developing secure election technology, is CISA’s partner. Arlo is used to conduct risk-limited audits (RLA), which VotingWorks calls the “best safeguard we have against hacked or otherwise faulty voting systems.” In an RLA, Arlo determines how many ballots to count, selects which ballots to inspect and compares audited votes to tabulated votes. Election officials in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Virginia, Ohio and Georgia are currently piloting the software and others are expected to join. Colorado became the first state to implement RLAs when in 2017 it audited one race in each of 50 of its 64 counties.

  • New machine learning from Alibaba and Netflix, mimicking animal vision, and more open source news

    Have you ever wondered how your dog or cat sees the world? Thanks to work by researchers at the University of Exeter in the UK and Australia's University of Queensland, you can find out. The team just released software that allows humans to see the world as animals do. Called micaToolbox, the software can interpret digital photos and process images of various environments by mimicking the limitations of animal vision. Anyone with a camera, a computer, or smartphone can use the software without knowing how to code. But micaToolbox isn't just a novelty. It's a serious scientific tool that can help "help biologists better understand a variety of animal behaviors, including mating systems, distance-dependent signalling and mimicry." And, according to researcher Jolyon Troscianko, the software can help identify "how an animal's camouflage works so that we can manage our land to protect certain species."

  • Some Of The Interesting Open-Source Projects For Outreachy's Winter 2019 Round

    Outreachy recently kicked off their winter (December to March) round of internships for diversity in tech with 49 individuals tackling a range of open-source tasks. Complementing the useful contributions made this summer during their previous round, some more interesting tasks are being tackled over the next few months too. In going through the 49 projects, some of the interesting ones include: - Adding "did you mean?" hints to Git when entering incorrect sub-commands.

  • [LibreOffice] QA/Dev Report: November 2019

    585 bugs, 67 of which are enhancements, have been reported by 365 people.