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gfranken's blog

Switch to KDE 4.2.2

Filed under
Linux

I've always been a diehard KDE user. When I first tried Linux several years ago, I experimented with both Gnome and KDE, and, for me, KDE just seemed to be a better fit. So, I've been trying to decide when to switch my home production machine from the KDE 3 series to KDE 4. Finally, last week, I made the switch...

My New Laptop and Linux

Filed under
Linux

I got my first laptop as an early Christmas present. It's an Acer Aspire 6930. Since it has Intel 5100 wifi built in, I needed a Linux version that would support that.

Mandriva 2009/KDE 4.1 Revisited

Filed under
Linux

As Mandriva prepares for its 2009 release, I've been updating Mandriva 2009 daily from their "cooker" (development) repository ever since I installed a beta version a few weeks ago. Last night's update was massive, with an update of over 350 packages.

Mandriva 2009 Beta 1 & KDE 4.1 - A Brief Report

Mandriva released the 2009 Beta 1 iso's on July 29th. I downloaded the i586 version then. Since then, hundreds of software updates, patches, and fixes have been placed into Mandriva's "Cooker" repositories, Cooker being Mandriva's name for it's development branch.

How are things shaping up for the Mandriva 2009 release? And how's KDE 4.1 working on this new release?

Openoffice.org mailing labels solution

My daughter is getting married this Summer, and she purchased some weird Avery return address labels for invitees to RSVP whether they plan to attend. The labels have an Avery number of 18195. I have no MS-Windows workstations at home, and I couldn't find an Openoffice.org Writer template for this particular label stock. What to do?

Run iexplore.exe under wine

Filed under
Linux

I hate having to use Microsoft Tools. At work, however, we have a web page that we have to update each week--and, it only works with Internet Explorer.

Since I'm now running my work workstation full-time under Linux instead of Windows XP, I've need to get MS iexplore.exe running under wine. It was simple--here's how I did it.

Motherboard Fails

Filed under
Just talk

Hardware is getting reasonably reliable if you are careful to buy components of decent quality. Recently, a bargain motherboard/CPU purchase at Fry's Electronics came back to bite me in the fanny.

From a PCLinuxOS user: Kubuntu Gutsy doesn't totally reek.

Filed under
Linux

I'm a confirmed PCLinuxOS and KDE user. But, I've given a brief trial on my test box of Kubuntu Gutsy-X86_64. Aside from the whole sudo vs su issue (I hate sudo), Kubuntu Gutsy doesn't totally reek. Actually it's usable. Either I have changed as a Linux user, or Kubuntu has gotten better.

ogg theora videos to avi

Filed under
Howtos

I've been writing a Ruby computer programming textbook (the going is slow). Along with the book will be a series of instructional videos on CD showing video computer screen clips with audio narration.

Wine is Getting Good

Filed under
Linux

Anyone else notice lately how good Wine is getting? No, of course I'm not talking about the beverage. Last year, Wine would only "sorta" work with the ClassXP software. This school year is a different story.

Sidux 2007-03 'Gaia' -- a quick look

Filed under
Linux

I come from a Mandriva/Mandrake/PCLinuxOS background. I'm a KDE guy who also installs gnome apps. I've not ever installed Debian, and I've used Debian derived distros very little. So, how does Sidux measure up for me?

Mandriva 2008 Beta 1, "Cassini" -- A few thoughts

Filed under
Linux

I can recall when a new impending release from Mandrake/Mandriva was great cause for excitement. In the last few years, Mandriva has been on the decline. Could the upcoming 2008 release start to turn things around?

Best I/O computer equipment

Everyone uses a monitor, mouse, and keyboard. What are the best choices of equipment for these?

Confession: I'm installing MS Windows

Filed under
Just talk

Yes, it's heresy, and I have a lot of guilt over it. Installing MS-Windows on any of my home machines is an anathema to me.

The Intrepid Investigator Report -- Sniffing Powdered Ubuntu CDs Cures Cancer!

Filed under
Humor

The Intrepid Investigator

Ubuntu Cures Cancer
by reporter Ursula Upton
filed: 16 March 2007 at 13:52.

Yes, it's a genuine miracle. In a scientific study by reputable scientists Borg Benderle and Lamer DiDiot (both affiliated with Shuttlecock University), the study found that sniffing powdered Ubuntu CDs brings about a dramatic reduction in the size of cancer tumors.

PCLinuxOS, Distros, and 10 reasons to try PCLinuxOS.

Filed under
Linux

I wonder if there is a survey that has information on how many different distros a typical Linux user has used over that last 5 years? Of course, I mean more than just an install trial where you experiment with a distro for a few days, then wipe or replace that distro.

For me, that number is a fairly conservative two. And one of those two distros is the (grown up) child of another.

Another Sabayon Linux 3.2 Look (from a non-Gentoo user)

Filed under
Linux

Sabayon Linux is a Gentoo based distribution that is designed to be easy to install and configure. Savvy Linux users know that Gentoo is a "roll your own" distribution where you create your own distro from scratch--installing and compiling all your programs. They say you learn a lot of Linux by doing a Gentoo install, and that you end up with a very speedy system optimized to your specific needs.

What about those of us who want to try the Gentoo experience without taking several days to get it up and running?

Then Sabayon Linux is for you.

Another OpenSUSE 10.2 Beta 1 Review

At the high school where I teach Web Page Design, Computer Programming, and Computer Literacy, it is Novell Netware Servers that provide our primary network services. This is also true in our school district's two middle schools, 6 elementary schools, the alternative school, as well as at the district office administration building. So, a Linux distribution that operates well as a Novell Netware client is essential.

However, the large majority of our workstations are Windows XP, so good MS Windows/Samba networking is also required.

With Novell now owning SUSE, and the importance of good Novell clients workstations at my high school, the choice of OpenSUSE should be a no-brainer. And, with Jeremy Allison (who works for SUSE) being one of the core Samba developers from the beginning, OpenSUSE should have very good up to date MS Windows networking support.

Java on Linux vs MS-Win XP

Filed under
Just talk

The computer lab we were using at Western Oregon University had Windows XP on all the machines. The first day of class, I used Win-XP for a few minutes--but I just couldn't stand it anymore . . . I whipped-out my PCLinuxOS CD I'd brought along with me, and proceeded to install Linux on the machine . . .

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More in Tux Machines

Announcing the release of Fedora 31 Beta

The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Fedora 31 Beta, the next step towards our planned Fedora 31 release at the end of October. The newest release of the GNOME desktop environment is full of performance enhancements and improvements. The beta ships with a prerelease, and the full 3.34 release will be available as an update. For a full list of GNOME 3.34 highlights, see the release notes. Read more Also: Fedora 31 Beta Released With GNOME 3.34, Guts i686 Hardware Support

Devices with Linux: Sm@rtDock, BalenaOS/Raspberry Pi 4 and More

  • Sm@rtDock 15 Touch is a 15″ 2-in-1 Laptop Dock for Samsung DeX Devices and Smartphones with a USB-C Port

    We’ve already covered several laptop docks for smartphones such as NexDock 2. AFAICR, all those modes would come with a full laptop body with non-touch display and keyboard.

  • BalenaOS may be the First Fully Functional 64-bit OS for Raspberry Pi 4

    BalenaOS 64-Bit OS Balena just announced the release of a 64-bit OS for the Raspberry Pi 4, that latest release of the iconic SBC.

  • Compact Kaby Lake embedded PC supports Linux

    Axiomtek’s fanless, rugged “eBOX100-51R-FL” embedded PC runs Linux or Win 10 on a 7th Gen U-series CPU and offers a pair each of GbE, USB 3.0, USB 2.0, and serial ports plus a DP++ port and M.2 slots for WiFi and SATA. Axiomtek announced a compact (142 x 87 x 58mm) embedded computer equipped with a power-efficient Intel 7th Gen “Kaby Lake U-series processor. Axiomtek calls the rugged eBOX100-51R-FL “the smallest embedded system with Intel Core ULT processor onboard.” Indeed, we have yet to see a smaller U-series based embedded PC. The system joins the larger Kaby Lake-U based Axiomtek ICO500-518.

  • Intel launches fanless, Apollo Lake based NUC mini-PC and SBC

    Intel has posted specs for a previously tipped “NUC 8 Rugged” mini-PC and 3.5-inch baseboard. The fanless NUC runs Linux or Windows on an Apollo Lake Celeron with soldered 4GB RAM and 64GB eMMC, M.2 for NVMe, and dual HDMI ports. Most of Intel’s NUC (Next Unit of Computing) mini-PCs are fan-cooled models with Intel Core processors, such as last year’s 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” based Bean Canyon NUCs. Now, several vendors have opened pre-orders for as low as $248 for a fanless, 150 x 108 x 32mm Intel NUC 8 Rugged model aimed at embedded applications.

I got 99 problems but a switch() ain't one: Java SE 13 lands with various tweaks as per Oracle's less-is-more strategy

Oracle on Monday announced the release of Java SE 13 (JDK 13), saying it shows the tech titan's continued commitment to make innovation happen faster by sticking to a predictable six-month release cycle. No evidence was provided to demonstrate that enterprise innovation is actually accelerating as a consequence of biannual platform revisions. Oracle at least deserves credit for its commitment to consistency. Word of JDK 13 arrived on Monday as Oracle's co-located OpenWorld and Code One conferences got underway in San Francisco. The Code One keynote, preceded as in previous years with a disclaimer that investors shouldn't rely on anything said at the show, opened with an overview of quantum computing by Jessica Pointing, a doctoral student in quantum computing at Stanford University. Read more

Programming Leftovers

  • To meet up or not to meetup

    I didn’t regret going to the meetup – quite the contrary – and I’ve since been to several, but it’s dreadful how low the turnout typically is. I’ve verified my numbers with some of the organizers of prior meetups: [...]

  • A look at development environments with specific tooling for Apache Camel Language

    A growing set of editors and IDEs provides specific tooling for development of applications based on Apache Camel. Historically, there was only Eclipse Fuse Tooling, which was based on the Eclipse Desktop IDE. Then, an IntelliJ plugin was created. Both of these tools are tightly coupled to the specific IDE APIs. Consequently, they have the drawback of not easily sharing the development effort.

  • mozregression update: python 3 edition

    For those who are still wondering, yup, I am still maintaining mozregression, though increasingly reluctantly. Given how important this project is to the development of Firefox (getting a regression window using mozregression is standard operating procedure whenever a new bug is reported in Firefox), it feels like this project is pretty vital, so I continue out of some sense of obligation — but really, someone more interested in Mozilla’a build, automation and testing systems would be better suited to this task: over the past few years, my interests/focus have shifted away from this area to building up Mozilla’s data storage and visualization platform. This post will describe some of the things that have happened in the last year and where I see the project going. My hope is to attract some new blood to add some needed features to the project and maybe take on some of the maintainership duties.

  • @Autowire MicroProfile into Spring with Quarkus

    Eclipse MicroProfile and Spring Boot are often thought of as separate and distinct APIs when developing Java microservices. Developers default to their mental muscle memory by leveraging the APIs that they use on a daily basis. Learning new frameworks and runtimes can be a significant time investment. This article aims to ease the introduction to some popular MicroProfile APIs for Spring developers by enabling them to utilize the Spring APIs they already know while benefiting from significant new capabilities offered by Quarkus. More specifically, this article covers the scope and details of the Spring APIs supported by Quarkus so Spring developers have a grasp of the foundation they can build on with MicroProfile APIs. The article then covers MicroProfile APIs that Spring developers will find helpful in the development of microservices. Only a subset of MicroProfile is covered.

  • Microsoft Makes Their C++ Standard Library Open-Source (STL)

    Microsoft has begun their next open-source expedition by open-sourcing an important piece of MSVC / Visual Studio... STL, their C++ standard library. In a surprising move, this week announced their C++ Standard Library used by their MSVC tool-chain and Visual Studio is now open-source. Microsoft's C++ Standard Library is available under an Apache 2.0 license and with the LLVM exception regarding linking, so all is well on that front.

  • Top programming languages of 2019 [Ed: Too reliant on biased Microsoft data such as GitHub]

    The most popular languages according to the world’s largest organization for engineering and applied science. It can be hard to gauge which programming language to learn — should you go for the most widely used language, the language developers enjoy using, or maybe the highest paid language? There’s no one right answer, but luckily there are no shortage of top programming languages lists ranking languages according to different criteria. The latest is the The Top Programming Languages 2019 list from IEEE Spectrum, the magazine for the world’s largest professional organization devoted to engineering and the applied sciences.